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Discussion Starter #1
Just picked up my new 1025 with bucket, mmm, and backhoe. I got it on my 10x5 dump trailer nicely and back home. Problem is the ramps that are included with the dump trailer are about 4.5 feet long and too steep/short and the backhoe bottoms out when trying to load/unload. I'm looking for some setup to enable me to do this easily and would love some suggestions?

We were able to get it on at the dealer by loading on a hill, but that isn't feasible everywhere.

Thoughts?

- Some blocks, or 4x6s under the ramps to reduce the steepness and provide slight bump off the ground?
- Others?
 

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How about unhooking the trailer from your truck and jacking up the front of the trailer before unloading. Just make sure you don't raise it too high that the back end bottoms out when unloading the tractor. It sounds like you just need a couple of inches. Maybe put a 6x6 across the back underneath so it doesn't bottom out.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You could put it in 4wd and use the backhoe to push down and lift the rear some while backing off. When I load an excavator into my dump I use the arm and bucket as a drag. Is there no dirtpile to offload into? Drive into a ditch or something?
I'm brand new to this unit and no experience with it, so wasnt' looking to do my first lesson of using the backhow on a dismount. There isn't a dirtpile easily accessible, but I'm scouting the neighboorhood. Looks like I will have a project once I get it unloaded.

I was hoping for some other type of ramp setup to enable me to do this easily in the future. But open to any suggestion to get the new toy off safetly :)
 

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Not sure how your ramps hook on the back of the trailer, but being a dump trailer could you raise the bed to lesson the steepness of the ramps?
 

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I'd say head back to the trailer dealer and trade up to get a longer trailer with longer ramps. Heck with looking for berms or hills. :good2:
 

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I do this all the time,,,
simply lift the dump bed until you have a shallow angle that suits you,,,

I usually don't do it because something hits,,
I just do not like driving up the steep ramps,,



It would be impossible to load this Cub Cadet and mower with the bed down,,,
 

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Longer ramps, they aren't expensive and you can store them inside the trailer when transporting. I would get them long enough that the loading and unloading with the trailer is perfectly level is ideal, probably 6 to 7 foot. Get aluminum ramps as the are lightest and will meet weight requirements. Make sure the ramps are rated for 3,500 lbs as ny time you have the tractor FEL and backhoe on the trailer, its going to be north of 1 ton in weight for sure.

These are ideal in weight rating, length, width, they have the crown to assist in unloading and Northern is a great company to deal with. They stand behind their products and they don't sell junk.

About 30 pounds a piece and they fold for easy handling. And they are on sale with Free Shipping......:bigthumb:

Ultra| Northern Tool + Equipment


Congratulations on your new tractor
 

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Not sure how your ramps hook on the back of the trailer, but being a dump trailer could you raise the bed to lesson the steepness of the ramps?
This could work also, not sure where the angle is to steep if you're worried about the centre of the trailer or bottom of the ramps. My trailer is much taller than yours guessing by the photo, I wouldn't even attempt to put my 1025 in there but i also have other options and for you its what works. If the backhoe bucket touches raise the arm, if the unit hoe itself seems to touch the dirt id say put it in 4 wheel and push on through. Lots of guys take their units into the woods and I'm sure have bumped a stump here and there. I don't think you'll break it, if you have a mid mount mower i would be worried about catching that on something though.

Had to edit to add welcome and add photos and if were lucky a video doing it!
 

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Can't recommend unhooking

How about unhooking the trailer from your truck and jacking up the front of the trailer before unloading. Just make sure you don't raise it too high that the back end bottoms out when unloading the tractor. It sounds like you just need a couple of inches. Maybe put a 6x6 across the back underneath so it doesn't bottom out.
I would suggest unhooking the trailer and then moving equipment on it is a bad idea. If there's any slope or softness in the ground the trailer will become an unstable see saw. There are lots of instances where truck trailer combinations slide down a hill just because the rear end of the truck lost traction and braking when a piece of equipment was being loaded or unloaded. No truck at all means no brakes on the trailer.

Have you tried backing the TLB onto the trailer? That might work but you will have to see if it affects the trailer tongue weight.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This could work also, not sure where the angle is to steep if you're worried about the centre of the trailer or bottom of the ramps. My trailer is much taller than yours guessing by the photo, I wouldn't even attempt to put my 1025 in there but i also have other options and for you its what works. If the backhoe bucket touches raise the arm, if the unit hoe itself seems to touch the dirt id say put it in 4 wheel and push on through. Lots of guys take their units into the woods and I'm sure have bumped a stump here and there. I don't think you'll break it, if you have a mid mount mower i would be worried about catching that on something though.

Had to edit to add welcome and add photos and if were lucky a video doing it!
The main part that bottoms out is the bottom of the backhoe at the bottom of the ramp where it touches the ground. I didn’t have an issue on the top side. It was slightly bottom out at the dealer and this was on asphalt. So maybe a slight adjustment of the dump trailer would do it imagine that mostly adjusts the top side.

Was thinking a couple of 2x12 on the ground under the ramp might do it too.
 

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Welcome to GTT!

Of course a long term solution would be to buy longer ramps. The 1025 with backhoe has a departure angle of 20 degrees. With an estimated trailer deck height of 26", you'd need 76.02" minimum ramp length to have a 20 degree departure angle (Hypotenuse Calculator). A quick and dirty way to calculate the ramp length for 20 degrees is to just take the trailer deck height and multiply it by 3 to find the ramp length. I'd go for 8 foot long 5,000 pound (or higher) capacity equipment ramps because the tractor (without operator) with the backhoe is going to weight in around 2,800 lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Welcome to GTT!

Of course a long term solution would be to buy longer ramps. The 1025 with backhoe has a departure angle of 20 degrees. With an estimated trailer deck height of 26", you'd need 76.02" minimum ramp length to have a 20 degree departure angle (Hypotenuse Calculator). A quick and dirty way to calculate the ramp length for 20 degrees is to just take the trailer deck height and multiply it by 3 to find the ramp length. I'd go for 8 foot long 5,000 pound (or higher) capacity equipment ramps because the tractor (without operator) with the backhoe is going to weight in around 2,800 lbs.
Thanks for the welcome. Very excited to learn more about the 1025r and appreciate all the feedback.

It looks as if my deck is about 22" high with the load on there....so I'm really close to the 20 degrees as is with the 54" ramps that come with it. It is a dump tralier so maybe a little tilt of the bed would do it and lower the bottom end a little to make this work to get it off in the short term. Or a slight blocking with 4 x 6 on the bottom.

I would like to get some ramps for longer term. Anyone have any recommendations on ramps with a 5000ish lb capactiy? I see the ones at Northern Tool are 3000lbs in the previous recommendation, but we are going to be right at the limit with me and the tractor and wondering if that is unwise.
 

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Here is a link to what I purchased to load/unload my 1025R TLB:

https://www.discountramps.com/lawn-garden/trailer/ramps/p/A-8416-3000-2/

They're not the 5000 lb rating you were seeking, but the 3000 lb rating is adequate for a 1025R TLB. My trailer sits lower to the ground than yours and I have no issues with anything contacting the ground.

I'm pleased with the quality, light handling weight and the price. They do offer them in a 7' 11" length, also. Click the options tab in the link.
 

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I made two 19x19" pads out of treated 2x10s screwed together at 90* (two front, two back). I set the pads on the ground and rest the ramps on them and the 3" of elevation is just enough to clear my backhoe. Depending on your angle, 3" might not be enough for your trailer.

The pads also protect the asphalt or grass from the ramps digging in. When I store the trailer, I stand the pads against the wheels on the sunny-side to protect the tires.
 

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if you are planning on hauling this all the time trade your trailer in and get a longer trailer and lower to the ground. TTWT has a good video on his trailer and why he had it built that way no need to rehash a well thought out idea.
 

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The do make trailer ramp extensions. They're used for loading low ground clearance cars onto trailers... Maybe make something like this out of lumber. The Race Ramp brand ramps are not exactly cheap..:gizmo:


race_ramps_RR-TR-4.jpg

race_ramps_trailer_ramps_1.gif

race_ramps_trailer_ramps_2.gif


Unhooking the trailer to load or unload has, "hold my beer and watch this..." written all over it!!!! :laugh:

I want to build a pickup height loading ramp out in my yard... It would make life easier for loading and unloading things.

You could also dig a shallow, sloping pit in your yard so when you back the trailer into it, the rear end of the trailer is lower and you could drive right in and out.. no ramps needed (at home)
 

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I'd "dump" the trailer a little to lower the rear end of the trailer a bit like others suggested. I do that with mine to eliminate the slope change at the top of the ramps (I don't have a backhoe though). Id also trying loading in reverse. That way the backhoe goes between the ramps and up, rather than into the ground. This assumes it gets enough height before crashing into the rear of the trailer...

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