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Discussion Starter #1
We are going to purchase a 3032e in the near future. This tractor will have a front end loader and bush hog to take care of the the roads on our tree farm. What I need to get now is the trailer to tow the 3032e. I am a total newbie and would appreciate any ideas or input. If you have any thoughts about which trailer brand is a good value, I would be especially happy to hear about it.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Get the biggest one you can afford because you will find your self using it for other projects. When I see dealers selling 3032e as a combination with a trailer and cutter I see them on either a 16 or 18 foot. If you get the 16 foot your cutter will hang off a little. The 18 foot seems to hold everything. I would get one that is at least that long and rated for 7k (two 3500 lb axles) and try and find one with brakes on both axles. A lot of trailer makers like to only put brakes on one axle.

I would also get a open flat trailer vs one with pipe on the outside. To me the open beds ones are more versatile.

Make sure your trailer can be towed by whatever vehicle you are using. What I am describing above requires at least a 1/2 ton truck/full size SUV although the new mid-size pickups might be rated for them. Do your research.

Good luck and enjoy the trailer and tractor.:bigthumb:
 

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What do you have to tow with?
 
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18 is better

Get the biggest one you can afford because you will find your self using it for other projects. When I see dealers selling 3032e as a combination with a trailer and cutter I see them on either a 16 or 18 foot. If you get the 16 foot your cutter will hang off a little. The 18 foot seems to hold everything. I would get one that is at least that long and rated for 7k (two 3500 lb axles) and try and find one with brakes on both axles. A lot of trailer makers like to only put brakes on one axle.

I would also get a open flat trailer vs one with pipe on the outside. To me the open beds ones are more versatile.

Make sure your trailer can be towed by whatever vehicle you are using. What I am describing above requires at least a 1/2 ton truck/full size SUV although the new mid-size pickups might be rated for them. Do your research.

Good luck and enjoy the trailer and tractor.:bigthumb:
I put my JD790 with bush hog on a 16' trailer but it doesn't give much wiggle room to get the fore and aft balance right. If at all possible, go to an 18. A 20 would be better yet. The above advice on brakes on both axles is on the mark. I would add that if your vehicle is rated for 10,000 lb or up towing, go ahead and get a 10,000 trailer. No, you don't need it right now but it's comforting to have extra capacity. If your tow vehicle isn't rated close to that, stay with the 7,000 lb trailer as they will be a bit lighter on the empty weight and therefore easier on the tow vehicle. Other things to look for- LED lights will use less power and cause less trouble than incandescent. Look at multiple and easy to use tie down locations. You will either need ramps or a tilt bed trailer. If it's ramps, make sure you can handle the ramps whether they are fold down or pull out and that the ramps are large and wide enough for the tractor and can be located to match the tractor wheels. If you aren't used to towing a trailer, see if someone can help you load the tractor the first time and make sure you get the weight distribution right. I painted the deck of my trailer with rectangles to mark the tire locations. If I put the tires on the rectangles I know I have the proper weight on the tongue.

Lots of things to think about but none of them are particularly difficult. Details do make a difference though. For longevity, you might look at the finish on the trailer. Was it primed and painted, just painted or primed and powder coated?

Treefarmer
 
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Will this be your only trailer?
If it is, think of what else the trailer would be used for, THEN look for a trailer.

I would not have any concerns about hauling that equipment in my tandem dump trailer.
I think the primary purpose intended for my trailer was to be able to haul a big skid steer.
So, it is compact, but, has a 10K load capacity.

I use the dump trailer for hauling anything,,, and everything.

Push-button unload has been the best thing for my applications.
 

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I would not even consider going smaller than the 18' car hauler we currently use with our 3038e. You need space to get the balance right as well as accommodate attachments...

Nick
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for the advice so far. My tow vehicle is a 2015 Ram 3500 Cummins single rear wheel. It is rated to tow 16,900 according to the people at Ram.

The 18' makes sense. What kind of ramps? Dove? What about brands? I see a wide range of prices here.
 

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Ramps

Thank you for the advice so far. My tow vehicle is a 2015 Ram 3500 Cummins single rear wheel. It is rated to tow 16,900 according to the people at Ram.

The 18' makes sense. What kind of ramps? Dove? What about brands? I see a wide range of prices here.
You've got lots of spare towing capacity, which is good. I have fold down ramps which have worked ok. At times it would be helpful if they were removable but they aren't. On the flip side, I'll never leave them at a job site. My dump trailer has slide out ramps that store underneath. Very handy but I've never used the dump trailer to haul equipment nor do I intend to since I have the flat bed that's longer and lower.

The ramp configuration might depend on your health and physical condition. Can you move ramps that might weigh a couple of hundred pounds and set them in place? If not, fold downs might be the way to go and even possibly adding lift assist. In any case, before purchasing I would try folding/attaching and stowing the ramps to make sure you are comfortable with the process.

Brands- Most of the larger brands make really good trailers but each has some differences. Much of the price difference is in the wheels and tires, front jack, ramps, rechargeable battery with charging circuit and similar add ons. Heck, it's not unusual to see trailers priced without the battery which is annoying. I would look at the wheel tire combo to see if replacements are readily available. Avoid clamp on wheels like house trailers use as those are usually an odd size and not readily available when you have two flats on a weekend. (Don't ask but that's my experience anyway.) If you have the time, pick a higher cost trailer, a mid cost trailer and a lower cost trailer and compare them in person to look at welds, tires, wheels, overall construction, finish and empty weight to GVW. You don't always get what you pay for but usually pay for what you get and the higher end trailers are usually better constructed. The difference may or may not be worth it to you but the comparison will let you see what you like and what you consider a frill.

Treefarmer
 
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It is rated to tow 16,900 according to the people at Ram.
I have a hard time believing that figure. They advertise that it has a 30k pound towing limit. maybe thats only with dual rears?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have a hard time believing that figure. They advertise that it has a 30k pound towing limit. maybe thats only with dual rears?
Yes. That's a dually, regular cab, no 4WD, plain interior, HO Cummins, 4.10 rear axle. Mine is SRW, 4WD, Laramie, quad cab. The Cummins in mine only has 800FT/LBS of torque. The HO has 900.
 

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My vote would be a 10K trailer, 20 foot, brakes on both axles. I like the extra room on mine. Sometimes I take a second implement along with the bush hog and the extra room is nice.

Folding ramps are good, but sometimes they get in the way. Removable ramps are more versatile than folding ramps but are a pain to use. If I ever have the chance to upgrade my trailer it will be a tilt deck.

If a gooseneck ball is an option I would go that way over a bumper pull.

Just like a tractor, get the most trailer you can afford.
 

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As has been said a 10 or 14k 20' car/equipment trailer with slide out ramps would work well and be the most affordable. That's what I have.

A goose neck dump trailer with a three way gate and ramps would be nice to have. But they cost a lot more than a car trailer.
 

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CADPlans, do you have a picture showing your dump trailer and how you get equipment into the trailer?
The ramps are pinned to each side.
I can lift the body slightly, resulting in a very low angle to ride up.
Point the truck trailer down-hill, and the ramp/bed combo can be level.



I have parked the trailer on a down hill grade, and rolled non-running machines onto the trailer.

The tractor in the pic is a JD 650.
 

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Yes. That's a dually, regular cab, no 4WD, plain interior, HO Cummins, 4.10 rear axle. Mine is SRW, 4WD, Laramie, quad cab. The Cummins in mine only has 800FT/LBS of torque. The HO has 900.
Yes, 800 ft/lb of torque is way underpowered....:lol::lol::lol::lol: I have a Duramax Dually it will tow way more than it's rated for but it's the stopping that becomes a problem...

For trailer brands Big Tex is a good one from what I have researched. I have a Texas Bragg utility trailer that is well made, not sure how good their big ones are. There are lot more brands out there but those two come to mind. You definitely need to research the trailer before buying as not all trailers are created equal. If it is really cheap there is a reason. Whatever one you get, a dove tail on the back will make easier it to load. A dump trailer has a lot of other uses but the longest one I have seen is about 14 feet so it might be a challenge to get a tractor and cutter on it. They probably make them longer but the price goes up fast on those. Since it is a one ton do you have a 5th wheel? If so you might want to consider a gooseneck trailer. You will be able to tow more and it should be more stable for you. I have always had a bumper pull but I have never heard of anyone complaining about a gooseneck trailer. They tend to be easier to maneuver.

Things about trailers to consider:

Decking- wood or metal. Wood is lighter but it wears out. Metal is way heavier but with that big Ram you will not care. I like metal but that's me.
axles- dexter torsion axles ride much better than an axle setup with leaf springs. Check out the tire size/rims. Make sure they are a common size as previously stated. On my enclosed trailer I have replaced more tires on road trips than I want to admit too but it helps to have a standard size so it's easier to find. Don't get too particular about tire brands, they are all made in China including the Goodyears and Carlisles. Expect them to die at the most inconvenient time.
hitch- I prefer a 2 5/16th's hitch as it is a beefier set up than a 2 inch hitch. Consider getting a weight distribution hitch if you intend to haul any heavy loads.
trailer frame- check on what size steel they use to make the frame. I had a cheap 16 foot car trailer once and the dove tail broke on my on the first trip because they used thin steel and crappy welds.

When you license it see if your state does a permanent plate. Big first time expense but then you never have to worry about it again. Also check and see if there is a annual inspection requirement. Your insurance will be cheap but check with your insurance company on whether they insure the load or just the trailer. Mine just insures the trailer and I think that is common but am not sure.

Since it is about the time of year that local and state fairs happen I would go to one. There is usually someone there hawking trailers and you can sometimes find a good deal plus you can check them out close without being chased too bad by sales people. That's how I bought my 18 foot car trailer. The dealer didn't want to haul it back across the state so I saved a few hundred. Never should have sold that one...
 

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This is excellent advice. The truck is prepped for a 5th wheel or gooseneck. There are some plugs you pull in the bed and insert either the gooseneck ball or a 5th wheel plated designed for the RAM trucks. The brake connector is also present in the bed. Everyone here probably already knows this. However, I have never used these as our travel trailer is a bumper pull.

Does a goose neck make weight distribution issues less complex? Treefarmer suggested getting the weigh distribution right and then marking the trailer so I would know where to put the tractor each time. This is excellent advice except I don't know anyone who would know if the trailer was loaded correctly or not. Believe it or not, I am the truck/travel trailer expert in my office. I am big on stupid proofing as much as possible so if a gooseneck would make this simpler then I will have to look hard as these.

I have an Equalizer weight distributing hitch that we use for the travel trailer. I could buy suitable spring bars for the equipment trailer if I go bumper pull.

I am 63 but very fit for my age and do not have any health problem but moving around 200LB ramps would not work for me. Thanks Treefarmer. I think I need fixed ramps.

Gents, I think I am getting somewhere on this thanks to you.
 

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I have an Equalizer weight distributing hitch that we use for the travel trailer. I could buy suitable spring bars for the equipment trailer if I go bumper pull.

I am 63 but very fit for my age and do not have any health problem but moving around 200LB ramps would not work for me. Thanks Treefarmer. I think I need fixed ramps.

Gents, I think I am getting somewhere on this thanks to you.
I guess the truck/trailer combination,,, as well as the intended use dictate whether you need a W/D hitch.
How far are you planning on hauling the equipment? THAT is a major factor.
I have pulled my dump level full of wet creek rock many times,, BUT, I was only going 10 miles.
I do not have a W/D hitch,, I would guess that rock weighed 2-3 times as much as the equipment you want to haul.

If you plan a 400 mile trip for this combo,, or 20K miles a year, I would be looking at a 4500 series truck.

As far as the ramps weight,, age 63 was a LONG time ago for me,,
I can handle a ramp with one hand,,, easily.
Look at the ramp,, it only has one handle,,, :dunno:
 

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A gooseneck or 5th wheel hitch puts the toung weight directly over the axle. You don't need any wheelbarrow handles with this kind of hitch. They help move the center of gravity forward more so the back end of the truck won't sag as much.
 

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The removable ramps that came with my trailer are heavy, but no where near 200lbs. Not sure of exact weight, but I'll guess 60 -70 lbs.
 
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