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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any first hand experience with towing a fairly heavy trailer with a 1025R? I have a new 1025R with an iMatch and Omni hitch. I would like to pull a trailer that weighs 4000# - is that possible? It will be in a dry grassy hay field with no major hills, and the load will be low to the ground on a flatbed.

I figured if I keep it in low, I should be OK, but what have you guys pulled before?
 

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That is pushing your luck. If you insist on doing it, be sure to use 4wd for extra braking and traction, plus go real slow. Under the right conditions, you should be ok, but things can get out of hand really easy.

Dave
 

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4,000 lbs is a lot for a 1 series. The tractor itself only weighs about 1,500 lbs so you're talking well over twice and just under three times the weight of the tractor.

What is the trailer, could you pull it with a pickup instead? Pretty much any modern truck could pull that no problem.
 

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I pull my 3500lb camper around my property with my 2720 (20' aluminum framed travel trailer). I take it slow and use 4WD on any type of hill more for braking and control than pulling power. The tractor makes for great maneuverability when parking the trailer compared to my F150. I used to use my jeep wrangler for the same effect, but I lifted it and I don't have a big enough drop hitch to get under the camper hitch. Visibility is much better on the tractor too. I think my 2720 weighs around 2000 lbs bare. I usually have the mower deck and front end loader on it while moving. That adds over 1000 lbs to make it 3000+.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I have a 2016 Denali HD with the Duramax diesel and Alison transmission - which I use to pull my big trailers (12,000+ lbs) but I was looking for a quick easy solution to moving a flatbed around in a field. I have two smaller trailers too (2000#) that the tractor will work for nicely, but this other flatbed would be 3500-4000 fully loaded I think. I could put the FEL and belly mower on the tractor to increase the weight. I am guessing that with the FEL and 60" 7-Iron deck, the 1025R is pushing 2,000 pounds.

I think if I am not going down a hill, and keep it in 4WD, it should be OK, but?...
 
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I know it's a different trailer, but I tried to just move our 3,500# gooseneck horse trailer a few feet the other day with the 1025 using the Heavy Hitch. The 1025 just popped a wheelie every time to tried to go forward. I couldn't go anywhere.

Granted yours is a bumper pull so the result will be different. However, it was obvious that 3,500 lbs was A LOT for the 1025.


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Actually, the tractor is more than capable of moving the trailer. The conundrum is that it is all about safety and risk taking. I am thinking that many of the members here would probably not try it or recommend it. But, if you are a risk taker and like playing the odds, well you know. The thing is when it starts going wrong, you are just a long for the ride. Good luck. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Actually, the tractor is more than capable of moving the trailer.
Correct, but the real question here is "How much can my tractor stop?" With a 4000lb trailer it would be easy to get into a tail wagging the dog situation.
 

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What Kennyd said.
Moving the trailer probably isn't the problem. Can you stop it is the $10,000 ????? On level, probably not a problem. If the trailer is behind you on a grade and you try to stop it and can't, this would be a really bad day!!!!!
If the trailer has brakes, I would wire up a switch to turn on 12 vdc to the brakes. Test the system on the level so you know the brakes lock up. This will provide a way to stop the trailer in case you have to!!!
 

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I have a 2016 Denali HD with the Duramax diesel and Alison transmission - which I use to pull my big trailers (12,000+ lbs) but I was looking for a quick easy solution to moving a flatbed around in a field. I have two smaller trailers too (2000#) that the tractor will work for nicely, but this other flatbed would be 3500-4000 fully loaded I think. I could put the FEL and belly mower on the tractor to increase the weight. I am guessing that with the FEL and 60" 7-Iron deck, the 1025R is pushing 2,000 pounds.

I think if I am not going down a hill, and keep it in 4WD, it should be OK, but?...
Your biggest problem will be keeping the front end on the ground if it is a flat surface. The tractor simply won't pull something if it is too much weight, but if it is a flat surface than it should be able to do a straight line pull of that much weight since it is on wheels. If not the hydro will simply go in to bypass and you will just sit there. However, if you have a lot of tongue weight it is going to make the front end rise up unless you have a lot of front ballast. I have moved that much weight on a trailer before with my JD 400 GT and it was hard to steer since the front end kept coming off the ground, had to use my split brakes to help matters. It's possible but not really the best idea unless you adjust the tongue weight and add a lot of ballast up front so you can keep the front end on the ground to steer.
 
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Here's what the 1025R Operator's Manual has to say on Towing:

Towing Loads

CAUTION: Avoid Injury! Stopping distance increases with speed and weight of towed load, and on slopes. Towed loads with or without brakes that are too heavy for the machine or are towed too fast can cause loss of control. Consider the weight of the equipment and its load.

Observe these recommended maximum road speeds, or local speed limits which may be lower:

  • If towed equipment does not have brakes, do not travel more than 32 km/h (20 mph) and do not tow loads more than 1.5 times the tractor weight.
  • If towed equipment has brakes, do not travel more than 40 km/h (25 mph) and do not tow loads more than 4.5 times the machine weight.
Ensure the load does not exceed the recommended weight ratio. Add ballast to recommended maximum for machine, lighten the load, or get a heavier towing unit. The machine must be heavy and powerful enough with adequate braking power for the towed load. Use additional caution when towing loads under adverse surface conditions, when turning, and on inclines.​

  1. Hitch the towed load only to the rear hitch plate.
  2. Connect safety chains to the lower draft arm crossbar and to the towed load. Provide only enough slack to permit turning.
  3. Before descending a hill, shift to a gear low enough to control machine travel speed without having to use the brake pedal to brake the machine and installed implements.
 

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All about the Mass. An object in motion ends to stay in motion until impacted on by an outside force.

Be careful on the downhills.
 

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Also in that was to only tow loads from the hitch plate and I would include draw bar. I am not a fan of towing or pulling from the I Match or that POS bar that goes between the 3pt hitch arms. Bad practice. Loads should only be towed or pulled that are below axle level. Just me and old school knowledge.

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I put a 1 7/8" ball in my FEL bucket just behind the cutting bar. Drilled a hole and bolted the ball in. I use that to move my 4000 lb boat around. The tongue weight is about 400 lbs and the FEL lifts it nicely and moving the boat around is no problem. The only tricky part is getting the ball in the hitch but 2 or 3 quick looks accomplishes that. Then I have to remember to tilt the FEL down so it doesn't bind on the trailer hitch. I don't go far and basically only do this to get the boat in and out of the garage and move it around the yard a bit. No road moving. When backing the boat into the garage I have plenty of control and it is nice to see where I am going. I also have to lock out the surge brakes on boat trailer so I can back it up. Works for me.
 

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I used my 1026r with FEL on to pull a full ton of wood pellets on my 900# trailer, so, 2900#. I had dropped the trailer off the truck at our turn around spot then hitched up the tractor using the JD 3-pt hitch, pulled it out on the driveway, then backed it down our fairly steep drive and parked it in front of our door. I took it really slow, but did not feel like I did not have control of it.

I say; try it out with the trailer empty at first, then incrementally give the trailer more weight and see how it feels. Only you can decide if the situation is unsafe.


Mr. Moose
 

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This is my 1025 earlier this year, 5 yards of damp mulch (600-800lbs per yard, from what I've read) on a very stout trailer. Attached to the heavy hitch, front end was light, but handled it no problem.
 

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Hmmmm

This reminds me of an incident years ago.

Always be tongue heavy..the alternative will not go well.,
Rears off the ground or light means no brakes.
Part 2 always be in 4x4 ( this goes back to the No Brakes part) unless your on dead flat ground with zero obsticles......That terrain dos not exist in Oregon @ least not on my tiny slice.

I always have the loader for that xtra brake on the front & my hitch is on the back of my box blade now for brakes on the back.

You still need to be tongue Heavy as the 3. has NO down Force.. YET...I'm werkin on that solution.
 

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when I moved heavy trailers with my 1025R I would fill the bucket with a load of dirt, seemed to help with the steering and braking.
 
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