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Anyone have issues with a leak at the drain plug after a transmission service? I did mine over the weekend, the plug was stupid tight. I'm not a small fellow, and it took just about everything I had on a regular socket wrench to get it broken loose. I tightened it back up just about as tight as I dared and noticed yesterday a very small leak from the plug area. :banghead: I'm going to try to torque it just a little more, but I'm afraid the washer may have been damaged with the dealer re-installation at the 50 hour service, and I definitely don't want to strip anything. Really not wanting to have to remove it, but if I must, I must. Anybody know the actual torque value offhand? Thanks in advance. 1025R, 141 hours.
 

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I'm not sure if the 1025R has a crush washer or just a normal washer on the drain plug. I would try just giving it another little nudge of tightening and see if the leak stops.

The manual only says "Install and tighten drain plug" - no torque specs. You gotta love it. This is one thing I dislike about aluminum blocks and housings. You never know how much to tighten the drain plugs. My experience has been like yours. They are always stupid tight when you go to remove the plug.

Drain plugs with crush washers are even worse. On my Honda generator, even with a new crush washer it will weep oil until you tighten it to what seems like 1 ft-lb prior to stripping. I wish they would give torque specs for the drain plugs and take all the guess work out of it.
 

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I found this in the back of the 1025R manual...

torque_specs.jpg

M811712.jpg

I have no idea what Class the drain plug bolt is. Assuming Class-7 (lowest on chart) and lubricated (it has oil on the threads) the chart recommends 69.6 ft-lb. That seems pretty tight. Personally, I wouldn't feel comfortable going that tight.
 

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I doubt I put 70lbs on it with an 8 inch wrench, and i too think thats probably too much for aluminum. My buell has an aluminum swingarm and the oil drain plug only takes 26 lbs. I'm gonna see if I can nudge it just a tad this evening and see what that does. Weird there's no torque value, I thought I overlooked it.

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Before I would tighten it any more, I would remove it, put a new O ring on it and tighten it hand tight and then a quarter turn max.. There is no need for that plug to be 70 ft lbs........The tranny case bolts that hold the covers on and halves together aren't more than 35 ft pounds in many cases......

Recently, a local "Quick Change" auto oil change shop in our area has damaged three friends cars by over tightening the drain plugs with an 18 volt impact. The result, a cracked oil pan in EVERY CASE. One friend had his Mercury Milan oil pan cracked and then his daughters Ford whatever is the same as his Milan was also cracked. He took both vehicles in on the same day. I think he said the oil pan was $450 plus labor......
 

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Well, I got another quarter turn before it dead stopped. That's as far as I'm going. If that doesn't work, new washer it is.

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Before I would tighten it any more, I would remove it, put a new O ring on it and tighten it hand tight and then a quarter turn max..
The parts list does not show an O-ring. Just the drain plug and washer.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nope, no o ring, just a washer. Man, I'm not lucky enough to have it quit on its on. More likely it would dump the whole thing overnight.

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I found this in the back of the 1025R manual...

View attachment 247481

View attachment 247489

I have no idea what Class the drain plug bolt is. Assuming Class-7 (lowest on chart) and lubricated (it has oil on the threads) the chart recommends 69.6 ft-lb. That seems pretty tight. Personally, I wouldn't feel comfortable going that tight.
Another interesting question is "What class are the threads in the pan?" The missing torque spec should consider both parts in the connection and be set to protect the weaker of the two. You can get in trouble using a general table for the bolt and not considering the threads.
 
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Another interesting question is "What class are the threads in the pan?" The missing torque spec should consider both parts in the connection and be set to protect the weaker of the two. You can get in trouble using a general table for the bolt and not considering the threads.
Although we do know that the transmission housing is aluminum on all these newer small tractors, I agree completely. Which is why it would be nice if they listed a recommended torque value specifically for the drain plug(s). I always cringe when I am tightening bolts that thread into big expensive, hard to replace chunks of aluminum.
 
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When I serviced my tractor for its first service there was Teflon tape wrapped around the threads. I purchased my tractor used with 60 hours on it and I have no clue if this was done by the factory or a dealer but since it was there when I removed drain plugs, I've always put new Teflon on the threads before reinstalling. I have never had any leaks around my drain plugs and I never had to tighten them to the point I was worried about going a touch to far.
 

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Teflon tape isn't factory. The factory seal should be a copper washer. Those washers wear over time or can be damaged by over tightening.

Tight drain plugs, especially in aluminum cases do not necessarily meant that the last person to service it overdid it. The heat and cool cycles the housing goes through in operation will "tighten" the drain plug on their own. I've had machines that I serviced the previous time with drain plugs that were difficult to get out, and I know they were installed properly. :unknown:
 

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Teflon tape isn't factory. The factory seal should be a copper washer. Those washers wear over time or can be damaged by over tightening.

Tight drain plugs, especially in aluminum cases do not necessarily meant that the last person to service it overdid it. The heat and cool cycles the housing goes through in operation will "tighten" the drain plug on their own. I've had machines that I serviced the previous time with drain plugs that were difficult to get out, and I know they were installed properly. :unknown:
The drain plug on engine oil pan has a washer but the drain plug on rear end has no washer at all on it. It's simply a square head plug much like the plugs found on gear boxes of rotary cutters. I'm a bit curious now as to what type of drain plug my tractor left the factory with verses what's in there now. It doesn't leak and fits fine so definitely not something I'll run out and correct but if I ever have problems, I'd like to replace it with the correct plug and washer.
 
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Use Teflon tape or permatex ptfe Teflon sealant on the threads and you'll never have a leak, won't seize on either.
 

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Use Teflon tape or permatex ptfe Teflon sealant on the threads and you'll never have a leak, won't seize on either.
That's exactly the direction I was headed in my spill about not having leaks with plugs with the exception of seizing, I never thought about that being another benefit of using it but your spot on correct. While in shop earlier today I looked over my tractor to make sure I was right in my thinking, the drain plug on rear end and a hose coming from fuel tank both have square head plugs with Teflon tape. I assumed this was done at factory but learned from this thread that Teflon tape isn't used at factory. I've never touched the plug on fuel hose so somewhere prior to owning it tape was added to it. There's another plug in rear end and the plug on mfwd that have ptfe paste on them. Owners manual says nothing about thread sealant but I wrapped the rear end plug that manual says to remove for service each time before reinstalling and have yet to have any moister around it. Added bonus is exactly what you mentioned, I never have a problem removing it for a service either.
 
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Glad to see you succeeded !

This forum is great, a lot of seasoned knowledgeable men that have been doing this along time. I'm a new tractor owner but would never be were I am at today if it were not for this forum. Electrical, linkage, Implements, 50hr service etc. I'm now totally out of control!!! Buying implement, fixing things on the rig and wife getting pissed because I'm coming off the tractor dirty as a coal miner and getting dirt in the house!! Glad it worked out. It's always nice to see some one with an ulcer over a tractor problem, getting help and going to bed with satisfaction and relief.
 

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When I serviced my tractor for its first service there was Teflon tape wrapped around the threads. I purchased my tractor used with 60 hours on it and I have no clue if this was done by the factory or a dealer but since it was there when I removed drain plugs, I've always put new Teflon on the threads before reinstalling. I have never had any leaks around my drain plugs and I never had to tighten them to the point I was worried about going a touch to far.
Hiya,

Be careful of Teflon tape with hydrostatic drive systems. The tape does tend to flake off and get into the oil. The very small clearances in hydrostatic systems can get plugged with these flakes. If you want to use a Teflon sealant, use a liquid type that will dissolve in the fluid if it gets in it.
 

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Hiya,

Be careful of Teflon tape with hydrostatic drive systems. The tape does tend to flake off and get into the oil. The very small clearances in hydrostatic systems can get plugged with these flakes. If you want to use a Teflon sealant, use a liquid type that will dissolve in the fluid if it gets in it.
That makes sense but I don't see how it could flake off on the particular plug that may or may not be the factory plug in my tractor. The plug doesn't go far enough into rear end to allow any exposed Teflon, unless it can flake off and work through the threads and enter the system.
 
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