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Looking thru the owner manual for Gator TX, it says to back the TX onto the trailer when transporting. Seems to me that at road speed , the wind
could get under the dash , (no cab) and push the hood off. That's why I always transported mine facing forward. Anyone know why Deere recommends hauling with Gator backed on trailer?
 

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No idea. Maybe they over produced extra hoods? :lol:
 

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I was talking with BigJim yesterday and this subject came up. He said his manual states to back the Gator on the trailer also. :dunno:

Just saw this in my manual...

Hauling the Machine NOTE: Space limitations can vary from one truck manufacturer to another. Short bed trucks do not have the necessary length requirement to accommodate the machine.



  1. Back machine onto the trailer or truck.
  2. Leave transaxle shift lever in Forward or Reverse gear.
  3. Park the machine safely. (See Parking Safely in SAFETY.)
  4. Fasten machine to trailer or truck with straps, chains, or cables.
  5. Equip the trailer or truck with all the necessary lights and signs required by local, state, provincial, or federal laws.
  6. Remove or secure optional attachments, if equipped.
 

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Looking at the specs, it looks like the weight bias may be like 35% front, 65% rear. Backing the machine on the trailer may make it easier to achieve optimum tongue weight.

They should be more specific in their suggestion, maybe indicating the heavy weight bias on the rear. But, as in most cases, you individual situation may not be the same as theirs, so always load your trailer in a manner than gives you the proper tongue weight and overall weight distribution.
 

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Looking at the specs, it looks like the weight bias may be like 35% front, 65% rear. Backing the machine on the trailer may make it easier to achieve optimum tongue weight...
:hi: That's my opinion, too.
 

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This was brought up several years ago on another forum. One of their members sent Deere Corporate the question and Deere's response was that they recommend loading it on a trailer facing backwards because, according to them, it's safer to load and unload that way.

Trailering your gator [Archive] - John Deere Gator Forum

The Deere response is listed in the 14th comment in that tread and was posted by "CaptDan".
 

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From my perspective I would rather replace the rear window( from possible flying debris when trailering) than the front windshield on my 825i with a deluxe cab.

This is why I back my gator onto the trailer.
 

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From my perspective I would rather replace the rear window( from possible flying debris when trailering) than the front windshield on my 825i with a deluxe cab.

This is why I back my gator onto the trailer.
Opposite here I have the poly windshield and glass back window. I transported mine facing forward as I would think the slant of the front windshields would work better than the flat back. Have never transported very far or at highway speeds so might be wrong. The front lip of the poly roof might catch wind also and lift it up also. :dunno:
 

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I have a Can Am Commander and it would be a sin to transport it backwards. Any type of accessory such as a roof or windshield are at real risk of blowing off at speed. Its pretty common in the side by side world to not transport backwards. Having said that, the windshield on the Gator looks more rigid than most aftermarket stuff I have seen. I would still personally not transport backwards unless the weight distribution is giving you little to no tongue weight.
 

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Boy I like that trailer. :thumbup1gif:
Thanks!

I "needed" a lighter 10' trailer than I had so the Gator could pull it from the road to the cabin when needed. Looked at Hillsboro & Aluma, like some features better on the Hillsboro!

All it takes is :gizmo: :lol:
 

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as gizmo2 said we just talked about how the manual of my 835R says it should be loaded backwards to be hauled somewhere.

ahh----the jd dealer where i bought it at-loaded it going forward----so i loaded it the same way. probably would of loaded it that way anyways. nuthing flew off of it bringing it home, and then taking it back for the snow plow blade to be installed then.
 

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I "needed" a lighter 10' trailer than I had so the Gator could pull it from the road to the cabin when needed.
That's my point. It's the perfect size. :thumbup1gif:
 

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We have a cab on the gator at work with poly front and glass rear. During a windstorm the rear glass blew out (shattered) the front poly had no issues. Load forward on the trailer... this was worst case scenario with over 100mph gusts.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Just a suggestion for those guys who trailer a Gator facing forward, place a large piece of cardboard over the windshield to protect the windshield from flying debris. Use bungees or ratchet straps to secure the cardboard in place.

When we hauled our Tucker Sno-Cats around the state, we always used cardboard to protect the windshield.

During winter months our state heavily sands the roadways.

We never replaced a windshield in 15 years to road debris.
 
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