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Discussion Starter #1
Curious as to tread experience. I would assume that on soft ground the order of decreasing grip would be Ag tires, industrial tires then turf tires. Have users found this to be accurate? Is a turf tire the most likely to slip/ spin? Just curious, but we did have a conversation about tearing up the lawn mowing with industrial tires as opposed to turfs.
 

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I had turf tires on my original sub compact which was a 2210. I work in the woods with my tractor along with mowing my 3 acres of “lawn”.

The turf tires is one of the reason I traded it in so quickly - not good at all in any kind of mud. plus I got lots of flat tires from multi flora rose and jagger bush thorns.

My 2520 has R4’s - work great in the woods and never any issue mowing the lawn.

If they were made I would have switched to the newer hybrid type radial tire they have now for the 1 series when I had to replace my front tires a couple years ago.
 

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For me the worst part of turf tire was I was turning the compost manure pile.. I have not a chance to try with anything other than turf, which would spin tires in a heartbeat even if I’m in 4wd. Not sure if industrials would be much better, especially when the area is wet. OTOH I am able to get on the lawn earlier in the damp spring without instant damage.
 

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For me the worst part of turf tire was I was turning the compost manure pile.. I have not a chance to try with anything other than turf, which would spin tires in a heartbeat even if I’m in 4wd. Not sure if industrials would be much better, especially when the area is wet. OTOH I am able to get on the lawn earlier in the damp spring without instant damage.
The industrial tires I have are good on solid ground or relatively firm mud. In slop and especially on any kind of icy surface, they aren't very good. It's a trade off for me as they are more puncture resistant and excellent in the woods. That inflexibility probably hurts traction.

If I was just going for traction I would see if there is a VF or IF tire to fit.

Treefarmer
 

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My 2520 has R4’s - work great in the woods and never any issue mowing the lawn.

If they were made I would have switched to the newer hybrid type radial tire they have now for the 1 series when I had to replace my front tires a couple years ago.
They are made, just don't know what the availability is. Goodyear/Titan has a hybrid out that is a bit closer to the R-1 than the other hybrid R-3. It comes in bias or radial, and best of all, it is made in a size to fit the 2520/2720's 17.5 inch rear wheel, as well as the 12" front wheels. I haven't called my local Titan dealer yet, but if I can get a set for anything close to reasonable, I'm gonna get rid of my R-4's and put on a set of these:
R14-T Tractor tires.png



For the time being, I'm modifying my R-4's with one of those cutting/siping tools. I'll post what I'm doing here and my rationale for the changes I'm making.
 

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They are made, just don't know what the availability is. Goodyear/Titan has a hybrid out that is a bit closer to the R-1 than the other hybrid R-3. It comes in bias or radial, and best of all, it is made in a size to fit the 2520/2720's 17.5 inch rear wheel, as well as the 12" front wheels. I haven't called my local Titan dealer yet, but if I can get a set for anything close to reasonable, I'm gonna get rid of my R-4's and put on a set of these:
View attachment 724311


For the time being, I'm modifying my R-4's with one of those cutting/siping tools. I'll post what I'm doing here and my rationale for the changes I'm making.
Wish I knew about them. I didn’t find anything when I looked when I replaced my front tires which was April 2018.

My rear tires were still fine and still are but depending on the price I might have bought the set of 4 then.
 

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I only saw them about a week ago, in somebody's thread here. I'm going to call tomorrow and check availability and prices.

I bought one of the tire cutting tools, like GTT started the "pass it forward" thing with a couple months ago. I may cut some grooves in the tread blocks like the videos show, but what I have already done to my front tires is alter the tread blocks.

The R4's on my 2520 are an older style, the chevrons have less angle than newer ones do, and the blocks are wide. Below : top picture is my 2520 tire, bottom is the R4 on a 1025R. Note the angle and length of the tread blocks and how much more open space there is on the newer style tire.
R4 tires 2.JPG
R4 tires 1.jpg


My thoughts are that the chevron is too short and there isn't enough open space between them near the center of the wheel. R4's are designed for extended use on hard surfaces like many commercial machines get, and traction in soft ground suffers as a result. My plan is to remove some of the horizontal portion of the lug to extend the chevron for improved grip, as well as self-cleaning ability. I've noticed that the tread packs up worse near the center of my tires when I get in mud and sticky dirt.

I started with my front tires because they were easier. The pattern is identical to the rear tires. I used a hacksaw to mark the tread blocks where I would remove a portion. The mark is parallel to the forward edge of the chevron, and by removing a portion of the lug, extends the space between the chevrons toward the tire center, much like the lug on a R-1 tire. The tire cutter has many different width cutters available, I ordered a 1/2" cutter in addition to the 1/4" cutter that comes with the instrument/tool.
DSC01133.JPG

DSC01130.JPG


I made two passes on each section of block I decided to remove, and then cleaned up the cuts with a Dremel tool and small sanding drum. I may cut grooves in the tread blocks later, like the videos show. I have no idea if the plan will increase traction; I feel that removing a portion of the center of the tread blocks will also place more weight on the outer parts of the lug, allowing them to bite better, but who knows? I'm not a tire engineer. Certainly it won't hurt to try.
DSC01125.JPG

DSC01131.JPG
 

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I only saw them about a week ago, in somebody's thread here. I'm going to call tomorrow and check availability and prices.

I bought one of the tire cutting tools, like GTT started the "pass it forward" thing with a couple months ago. I may cut some grooves in the tread blocks like the videos show, but what I have already done to my front tires is alter the tread blocks.

The R4's on my 2520 are an older style, the chevrons have less angle than newer ones do, and the blocks are wide. Below : top picture is my 2520 tire, bottom is the R4 on a 1025R. Note the angle and length of the tread blocks and how much more open space there is on the newer style tire.
View attachment 724322 View attachment 724323

My thoughts are that the chevron is too short and there isn't enough open space between them near the center of the wheel. R4's are designed for extended use on hard surfaces like many commercial machines get, and traction in soft ground suffers as a result. My plan is to remove some of the horizontal portion of the lug to extend the chevron for improved grip, as well as self-cleaning ability. I've noticed that the tread packs up worse near the center of my tires when I get in mud and sticky dirt.

I started with my front tires because they were easier. The pattern is identical to the rear tires. I used a hacksaw to mark the tread blocks where I would remove a portion. The mark is parallel to the forward edge of the chevron, and by removing a portion of the lug, extends the space between the chevrons toward the tire center, much like the lug on a R-1 tire. The tire cutter has many different width cutters available, I ordered a 1/2" cutter in addition to the 1/4" cutter that comes with the instrument/tool.
View attachment 724324
View attachment 724325

I made two passes on each section of block I decided to remove, and then cleaned up the cuts with a Dremel tool and small sanding drum. I may cut grooves in the tread blocks later, like the videos show. I have no idea if the plan will increase traction; I feel that removing a portion of the center of the tread blocks will also place more weight on the outer parts of the lug, allowing them to bite better, but who knows? I'm not a tire engineer. Certainly it won't hurt to try.
View attachment 724326
View attachment 724327
Very nice! I just don’t have the dexterity to do something like that anymore - nor the patience!

I simply use my chains in the winter myself.

724354
 

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Living on a private road, the residents are well aware of, and very sensitive to the cost of maintaining the road. So chains really aren't an option for me.
But they are extremely effective!
 

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Very nice! I just don’t have the dexterity to do something like that anymore - nor the patience!

I simply use my chains in the winter myself.

View attachment 724354
Nice set of chains, and great for snow and ice, but my bigger need is traction in the dirt, for gardening. Last Fall, right after I got the tractor, I was pretty disappointed how much slip the R4's had trying to pull a plow and a reverse rotation tiller. My smaller X748 did better almost but I had R1's on it. Also, my experience with R1's and mowing told me that they would be fine for lawn work (mowing). I had Carlisle TruPowers on the X7, never had any issues with tearing up the lawn, so I'd like to go closer to that route than an R3. Of course, the hybrid R3's would do, but have been unable to find them in the needed size for the rear without changing wheels as well.

Cutting the tires was easier than I thought it would be. All you really have to do is carefully set your cutting depth and let the cutter get plenty hot, and then just push. Cutting the blocks was fairly slow because the wider cutter is taking more rubber at a time and requires going slower and pushing harder than a narrower cutter does. That beast really gets hot, you have to hang it with the handle down, or it will melt the grip from rising heat. It's a neat tool and easy to use. I cut both front tires without breaking a blade.
 

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I just got off the phone with a local tire store, they ordered a set of the R14T's in bias 6-ply in my sizes (14-17.5 rear, 23x8.50-12 front) and they will be here Thursday. Mounted price for two front and two rear is $930 incl. tax. I can live with that, I figured it would be twice as much, frankly.
 

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Nice set of chains, and great for snow and ice, but my bigger need is traction in the dirt, for gardening. Last Fall, right after I got the tractor, I was pretty disappointed how much slip the R4's had trying to pull a plow and a reverse rotation tiller. My smaller X748 did better almost but I had R1's on it. Also, my experience with R1's and mowing told me that they would be fine for lawn work (mowing). I had Carlisle TruPowers on the X7, never had any issues with tearing up the lawn, so I'd like to go closer to that route than an R3. Of course, the hybrid R3's would do, but have been unable to find them in the needed size for the rear without changing wheels as well.

Cutting the tires was easier than I thought it would be. All you really have to do is carefully set your cutting depth and let the cutter get plenty hot, and then just push. Cutting the blocks was fairly slow because the wider cutter is taking more rubber at a time and requires going slower and pushing harder than a narrower cutter does. That beast really gets hot, you have to hang it with the handle down, or it will melt the grip from rising heat. It's a neat tool and easy to use. I cut both front tires without breaking a blade.
With these tractors I think no matter the tire type we will always run out of traction before running out of power. But those tires you are getting look like they will be the best for garden work for sure.

I just got off the phone with a local tire store, they ordered a set of the R14T's in bias 6-ply in my sizes (14-17.5 rear, 23x8.50-12 front) and they will be here Thursday. Mounted price for two front and two rear is $930 incl. tax. I can live with that, I figured it would be twice as much, frankly.
I’m so envious - I would have paid that price when I bought my front tires. But now I will await issues with my rears before I change.

I would likely have to pay freight on them anyway as we have no real tire shops around here. I got my front tires at Walmart.
 

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With these tractors I think no matter the tire type we will always run out of traction before running out of power.
That's for sure, but I'd like to narrow the gap a bit. Someone said here that the R4's in snow were like having skis on the back; I can easily believe that; in mud I'm having the same issues, even with more than 500 lbs on the rear lift.

The only downside to getting the new tires is, I have to dismount the wheels/tires from the tractor myself and take them to the tire store, they didn't want to take responsibility for the tractor. Okay by me, I have an impact wrench, floor jack and jackstands, and I've confirmed I can get the tractor on the stands, and have checked to see if the bolts are able to loosen. I talked to the local Deere dealer and he confirmed that the outside gearcases on the final drive are the best place to set jack stands, but to leave the jack in place and jack the rear from under the drawbar. Front axle is no problem, anywhere is fine for stands.
 

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That's for sure, but I'd like to narrow the gap a bit. Someone said here that the R4's in snow were like having skis on the back; I can easily believe that; in mud I'm having the same issues, even with more than 500 lbs on the rear lift.

The only downside to getting the new tires is, I have to dismount the wheels/tires from the tractor myself and take them to the tire store, they didn't want to take responsibility for the tractor. Okay by me, I have an impact wrench, floor jack and jackstands, and I've confirmed I can get the tractor on the stands, and have checked to see if the bolts are able to loosen. I talked to the local Deere dealer and he confirmed that the outside gearcases on the final drive are the best place to set jack stands, but to leave the jack in place and jack the rear from under the drawbar. Front axle is no problem, anywhere is fine for stands.
I thought about what you are doing a few times in the past. Once I get the tractor up on stands how do I load the tires in the pickup without a loader...??
 

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I thought about what you are doing a few times in the past. Once I get the tractor up on stands how do I load the tires in the pickup without a loader...??
Luckily, I have a dovetail flatbed trailer. Otherwise, I'd be screwed. Even if I could get them high enough to put in my pickup, the bed isn't big enough for all 4 tires.

@ maineuropa: sorry I derailed your thread; hope our discussion gave you some food for thought, though. Tires can make or break a tractor; each has the strong and weak points. Some are a compromise and are only mediocre for almost everything, rather than being really good for one thing. R4's are those compromise tires. Arguably, their best point is long life, but some would say it's their worst point, because they won't wear out so you can get a better tire.
 

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Keep us informed as to how they do.
I am not liking my R4s, its been real wet here and the R4s seem to be doing more damage and creating more mud holes than the R1s on my other tractor.
 

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Keep us informed as to how they do.
I am not liking my R4s, its been real wet here and the R4s seem to be doing more damage and creating more mud holes than the R1s on my other tractor.
X2!
 
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