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Discussion Starter #1
This is way off topic on a Deere forum but I have learned to expect big things from you guys. So, I have this poorly placed hickory tree on my driveway. Or is it a poorly placed driveway? In any case, the first time I brought my camper in this tree jumped out and bit my camper. The most significant damage was the latch in this picture.

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The latch still works fine. From what I have read these doors are not a "standard" shape. So swapping just the door is not very realistic. I am thinking that I could fix this with a disk of think stainless. I have been looking for some sort of oversize washer. But I want it to be in chrome or stainless. I can't seem to find any sort of trim bezel made for the purpose of covering a poorly cut hole.

Thoughts? Ideas?

Thanks,

Lee
 

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What's that door made of? Looks like maybe aluminum and some fiberglass.

A big stainless trim piece would work, but I think you'd need to go large enough to cover all the compromised area. Everywhere the outer skin was cracked would need to be under it. You'd also want to seal it somehow to keep moisture out.

Can you measure the damaged area? How large of a piece would you need?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The door is fiberglass. The damaged area is fairly small. I will try to take better pictures tomorrow. I would guess that the damage its limited to an area less than 2 inches in diameter.

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I think you want something square and go to the aluminum edge frame. I would go to your local sheetmetal shop and have them cut you a piece. Get some white caulk and seal behind it and screw bolt it in place.

Stainless will be hard to drill with some bits. That large lock hole will be the worst part. Unibit will work if you have one.

Should be easy fix.

You might consider going to a place like homedepot and getting a chunk of plastic similar to that stuff they put on walls. Easy to cut and drill and wont corrode. Comes in white.

Sent from my tapatalk device. Fat fingered typing (misspellings) probable..
 

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It looks to me like the lock has been pushed into the door. Is that right? If so, I would pull it back to the right plane,cut a piece of stainless,take the lock apart and insert it though a new hole in the stainless,then pop rivit the whole shebang back onto the panel. Be sure to coat the inside of the repair panel to stop corrosion. You might look in the plumbing section of Lowes/Home Depot for an escutcheon plate that could work....they make all different sizes and depths.
 

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A large fender washer might do the trick. McMaster-Carr should have them if you can't source one locally. You'll still have to do some work on the washer to make it work.
 

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Will the whole door come off easily Lee? If so bring it up here one day, we can make something to fix it. I like a aluminum idea...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have to tell you guys something- When this first happened I posed this same question on a large RV forum where I used to spend time. I did get the fender washer suggestion over there but was thinking I wanted something with either a polished aluminum finish or stainless. But, honestly, I barely got any response.

I am going to take a more detailed look and get some dimensions. I think it is time to actually remove the latch (I postponed that because I expect to lose any chance of it holding again in the broken area without some patchwork). I am fairly certain that the latch sustained no damage. These things don't really have any structure from the beginning.

I have to look closer, but I am not sure if the door can be removed without taking the frame out (which is sealed into place). I could be mistaken. I know it is connected with a piano hinge but suspect that the hinge is installed with rivets.

These campers are junk. (at least the ones I can afford). When I have taken things apart, I am often amazed that they held together to begin with. They have 2 contrary goals when building these rigs. Low weight and low cost. In order to meet both goals (or compromise) they rely a lot on structural glue, very thin materials, while using plastic, luan, etc. I have seen materials in these campers that I honestly think are being custom manufactured for this industry. The problem is, weight really does matter. So when I take something apart, I want to beef it up but should not. I am already pulling around 13,000 lbs down the road. And again, they cut so many corners that the tires and axles are running at near 100%. I think I may have 7000# axles. And that 13K number is something I have not had the nerve to scale, because I can't change it. If it turns out I am higher, it will only yield anxiety so why bother!

Couple all of that with a rig that bounces down the road, gets whacked into trees, and is exposed to the elements all of the time and you have a rapid rate of depreciation. OK, now I am depressed.

I will give you guys an update when I have more info.

Lee
 

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These campers are junk. (at least the ones I can afford).
Lee, my neighbor (behind me) has a 150k diesel pusher, tag axle on a bus chassis...trust me, it's junk as well-I can't believe some of the things he's (and "we" sometimes) have had to do to it.

Here we are replacing the fridge a few years ago:
IMG_0326.jpg IMG_0322.jpg
 

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Campers and motor homes are just high maintenance no matter what. My dad bought a Winnebago last year. He handed the guy the money and when he walked away I told my Dad that was the cheapest part of the deal. He looked at me like I was nuts. He knows what I meant now. LOL.
 

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We can buy Stainless Fender washers at the local Hardware store............ (I'll mail you some.) let me know. ~Scotty
 

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Campers and motor homes are just high maintenance no matter what. My dad bought a Winnebago last year. He handed the guy the money and when he walked away I told my Dad that was the cheapest part of the deal. He looked at me like I was nuts. He knows what I meant now. LOL.
I have a gasser with a Frod V10 in it. Sometimes I wonder how come that parts of it don't drop of on bad roads. But oh wonder, it is a 2002 and everything is still in its place. if have not had any problems with it over 62 000 miles, but a few weeks ago coming back from Florida, the Onan/Cumings generator decided that it would not work anymore. I thought that this thing would work for ever (considering its good brand name), and the motorhome would be gone long before, but I was wrong!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have a gasser with a Frod V10 in it. Sometimes I wonder how come that parts of it don't drop of on bad roads. But oh wonder, it is a 2002 and everything is still in its place. if have not had any problems with it over 62 000 miles, but a few weeks ago coming back from Florida, the Onan/Cumings generator decided that it would not work anymore. I thought that this thing would work for ever (considering its good brand name), and the motorhome would be gone long before, but I was wrong!
My friend is having issues with his Onan genny on a 2 year old 5th wheel. He thinks that his float is stuck or a piece of garbage is in the needle seat. Hope yours is something easy.

I did not get a chance to go out and take this apart any further tonight. It may be a day or two before I get a chance. Thanks for all of the feedback.

Lee
 

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As a Realtor friend of mine says, "A motor-home is a mortgage on wheels."

A Mechanical Engineer friend of mine says, "A boat is a hole in the water you pour money into." He also says, "A horse is a four-legged hole you pour money into."


Another thought is you could get one of those armored trunk lock surrounds people in New York City put on their cars to slow down the bad guys from punching the trunk lock out to get at their junk in the boot.
 

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My friend is having issues with his Onan genny on a 2 year old 5th wheel. He thinks that his float is stuck or a piece of garbage is in the needle seat. Hope yours is something easy.

I did not get a chance to go out and take this apart any further tonight. It may be a day or two before I get a chance. Thanks for all of the feedback.

Lee
Mine sound more like a bearing problem in the generator part. I think I have to pull the entire thing out. And that is a PITA because it has to dropped from the RV and pulled out from underneath it. Over the years i found that RV's (I had a travel trailer before) are not build for easy repair and maintenance. Their quality is there where the US auto industry was in the late 60's and 70's. It just lucky that the chassis is more modern (it is a Ford truck underneath the house part), and the Ford V10 is a nice piece of machinery.
 

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Here are a couple more pictures with a ruler for better perspective. I still haven't had time to take out the latch.

View attachment 15439
View attachment 15440
If those hatches are made like the ones on my motorhome (and i assume it si like this), you should be able to repair them with fieber glass and resin. It is nothing else than fiberglass laminated onto a foam core. I would try to cut this section out (with a Dremmel), including the foam core, replace the foam with some wood and put new fiber glass over it. Once everything is cured, I would drill a hole through it and replace the latch.
 

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Here are a couple more pictures with a ruler for better perspective. I still haven't had time to take out the latch.

View attachment 15439
View attachment 15440
Lee- That too big for the Fender Washer Fix! If you want to 'sandwich-it' with thin aluminum sheets or stainless would probably work. (Think two 'Credit Cards') We've got a Metal Supermarket, down the street. They've got a drop bucket with scraps, for cheap, if you want me to look. ~Scotty
 

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Its smaller than I thought. If it was mine I think I would remove the door so you could lay it flat. Or maybe just open it so its out flat.

Remove the lock and tape around the damaged area and go to store and get a fiberglass repair kit as Hudsoner said.

Remove any loose chunks and fill in with soaked fiberglass mat keeping it slightly low. Then do a final coat with resin only and ream the hole back out to fit the lock. Little spray pain and you will barely notice it. Couple hours work and you would be golden.

Make sure you keep tape on the good areas around the damage.
 

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Its smaller than I thought. If it was mine I think I would remove the door so you could lay it flat. Or maybe just open it so its out flat.

Remove the lock and tape around the damaged area and go to store and get a fiberglass repair kit as Hudsoner said.

Remove any loose chunks and fill in with soaked fiberglass mat keeping it slightly low. Then do a final coat with resin only and ream the hole back out to fit the lock. Little spray pain and you will barely notice it. Couple hours work and you would be golden.

Make sure you keep tape on the good areas around the damage.
+1...no different that setting a bass boat down over a small stump and poking a hole in the bottom...clean, dry, fiberglass, redrill, paint and it is probably better than new. I speak from humble experience.
 
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