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Think twice, cut once:

 

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Painful, just painful

Think twice, cut once:

Some of those were funny but some were clearly people badly hurt. It's amazing that more people aren't hurt- trees, chainsaws and ignorance are a bad combo but still sometimes pretty funny. I can't imagine not moving vehicles out of the way just as a precaution.

Treefarmer
 

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I have been the guy knocked off of the ladder......TWICE. Suck city.

Messed my back up GOOD in 2012 and haven't been the same since. Be careful people.
 

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I had a 370 pound customer/homeowner climb my 12.5' Ohuhu telescopic ladder (300# rating) several weeks back. The tubes never locked in tight after that. That guy had no clue how close he was to collapsing that ladder.

Not even mentioning how dangerous it was for him to be on a composition roof. He could have easily found a soft spot in the roof and put a foot thru.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 

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I think I just witnessed a few people die, at least 3-4 broken legs, a few broken other things, and allot crap stained drawer's..... scary. I don't think I'll ever be able to use my chainsaw again.
 

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My FIL has done tree work his entire adult life and has had his own business for over 40 years. I've worked with him many times as well as most of the family.
The one thing he always talks about is people cutting off of ladders. And there is why.
I sent the video to my BIL, who works there, and told him to play for morning safety meeting.
Some of those people got seriously wrecked.
 

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Wow. I just couldn't watch it all.

Back in the early 80's my BIL and I took down 63 tall pines in a weekend. All were within striking distance of my new house and many were near utility lines. I still can't believe we did all that work without any issues. Now, we did plan what we cut and where we intended it to drop but looking back.........more balls than brains. Nope, not any more. :hi:
 

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:unknown:i watched some of them videos one night i couldn't sleep a couple of winters a go now. bad-bad-i thought. just p44$$ poor planning for the most part. my dad cut timber his whole life--and safety was very high on his list-as he only nicked his work shoe once in that amount of time.

my one uncle was not that lucky back then. once a yr it seemed he got hurt-he could cut way more timber, than my dad could-but at a cost. my dad would make several extra cuts on the limbs, as he worked his way to the top of tree, we cut 5 ft paperwood out of the tops, after if it made a log. so i think that's one reason he was so careful over them yrs.

me-not as lucky--i got my dad to file one of my chains back in the day, against his better judgement--i was being cheap not wanting to buy a new chain-this was gonna be the last sharpening of the chain, i was trimming some apple tree limbs for fire wood-saw came back up towards me-no chain brake on it-old homelite XL12 -AND SLICED open 4 of my fingers-went to ER-had stitches in all 4 fingers-missed 4 days of work-well the whole week as i was working down in DC back then. this happened on a Sunday morning.

so it would of been way cheaper to buy the new chain--:lol: lesson learned for sure.
 

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I could only watch 3/4 of it. That’s a lot of pain.
I don't watch many of these, a very good friend of ours was killed 8 years ago by a widow maker, the day before Emma was born. He was a professional logger who was very good at his work but picked up a job with time restraints and was more than likely rushing that day. Trees and chainsaws aren't the problem, in most of these type of videos it's people who think they know what they are doing that is the problem.
 

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I don't watch many of these, a very good friend of ours was killed 8 years ago by a widow maker, the day before Emma was born. He was a professional logger who was very good at his work but picked up a job with time restraints and was more than likely rushing that day. Trees and chainsaws aren't the problem, in most of these type of videos it's people who think they know what they are doing that is the problem.
sorry to hear that of ur friend -pjr832---u just never know.
 

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Cutting off ladders

My FIL has done tree work his entire adult life and has had his own business for over 40 years. I've worked with him many times as well as most of the family.
The one thing he always talks about is people cutting off of ladders. And there is why.
I sent the video to my BIL, who works there, and told him to play for morning safety meeting.
Some of those people got seriously wrecked.
When I was a teenager we were trimming limbs around a field edge by climbing trees and cutting as there were no pole saws in those days, at least not powered ones available to the average person. There was a big oak tree with limbs that swept down and out over the field. At the trunk they were probably 25' high but in the field they dropped down to combine height. These were large limbs, probably 6" or more at the trunk.

My Dad used our 40' ladder and went up the back side of the tree until he could climb, roped himself in and cut a limb. He knew to undercut but I guess reaching around he couldn't get enough undercut because instead of dropping down, that limb peeled all the way around the back side of this sizable tree and totally wiped out the ladder. He wasn't on it and wasn't hurt but he was 30' in a tree with no ladder to get down. That was the first and last time I ever saw him lower himself totally vertical by rope and the last time we left a ladder against a tree when cutting anything bigger than a branch.

Treefarmer
 

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Kenny -

Thanks for posting this. It's a powerful visual reminder of how quickly and badly things can go wrong. I recognized some Russian license plates in several of the scenes. Having lived and worked in the Former Soviet Union, a lot of folks there lack safety awareness and get timid about saying anything or stopping the job to regroup if things don't look right.

One of the responders to your post suggested tag lines. Many were seen in the scenes, but they seemed to me to be slack or not well anchored or snubbed off, which negates the purpose of a tag line.

For the members of GTT who cut and burn wood, a video like this shows how real and strong that the law of gravity is, as are Newton's conservation of mass and momentum principles.

Thanks again for raising safety awareness.

Brian


Think twice, cut once:

 

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Living in the woods now, and having to deal with lots of standing dead trees in addition to clearing others for land re-purposing (is that even a word?), Ive seen several of these.
My neighbor, who has been cutting trees for a very long time, "helps" me fell them. I say "helps" because initially I thought he was very experienced at it, though after the past year, Im not so sure that I dont know a lot more about it than he does.
Had one close call recently that I wont repeat, due partially to his advice and partially to me not doing what I knew I should.
While cutting a leaning Ash, a BIG one, it decided to go crazy on me. Again, my fault, but the end result was the tree on the ground, mostly where we wanted it so not too big a deal, but it could have been.
While making the back cut, it started to go, very slowly. Thats not good, in case you dont know. In this case, my neighbor yelled that it was going, and I stopped cutting. It only moved a little then stopped.
I started cutting again, and he stopped me again. Now, at this point, I knew better than to stop cutting, but I did.
Shortly after, as it was still falling slowly after the second cut, it split up the side from the hinge, maybe 30 feet. It went FAST. After that, the other part that was left split vertically the other direction, and the part that "fell" went down the center of that split. Luckily the lower portion of the split didnt break away from the tree, as someone could have been hurt.
It looked very similar to the one at about 1:38 in the video above!
I imagine I looked a lot like the guy trying to get away too!

Anyway, I watch a lot of these as a "what not to do" kind of thing. I look at what they did and try to figure out how to do it the right way.
That said, if there is any danger of it hitting a building, I let someone else with a ton more experience than me do it. Well worth the cost to have someone come in and drop it rather than me try it and have to pay a deductible.
Interestingly enough, the guy that Id have do the dropping used to be a professional cutter. He quit when he fell 60' after his climbing strap was split by a tree. That is one lucky man to still be alive, let alone able to run a home improvement business.
 

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Barber chair

Living in the woods now, and having to deal with lots of standing dead trees in addition to clearing others for land re-purposing (is that even a word?), Ive seen several of these.
My neighbor, who has been cutting trees for a very long time, "helps" me fell them. I say "helps" because initially I thought he was very experienced at it, though after the past year, Im not so sure that I dont know a lot more about it than he does.
Had one close call recently that I wont repeat, due partially to his advice and partially to me not doing what I knew I should.
While cutting a leaning Ash, a BIG one, it decided to go crazy on me. Again, my fault, but the end result was the tree on the ground, mostly where we wanted it so not too big a deal, but it could have been.
While making the back cut, it started to go, very slowly. Thats not good, in case you dont know. In this case, my neighbor yelled that it was going, and I stopped cutting. It only moved a little then stopped.
I started cutting again, and he stopped me again. Now, at this point, I knew better than to stop cutting, but I did.
Shortly after, as it was still falling slowly after the second cut, it split up the side from the hinge, maybe 30 feet. It went FAST. After that, the other part that was left split vertically the other direction, and the part that "fell" went down the center of that split. Luckily the lower portion of the split didnt break away from the tree, as someone could have been hurt.
It looked very similar to the one at about 1:38 in the video above!
I imagine I looked a lot like the guy trying to get away too!

Anyway, I watch a lot of these as a "what not to do" kind of thing. I look at what they did and try to figure out how to do it the right way.
That said, if there is any danger of it hitting a building, I let someone else with a ton more experience than me do it. Well worth the cost to have someone come in and drop it rather than me try it and have to pay a deductible.
Interestingly enough, the guy that Id have do the dropping used to be a professional cutter. He quit when he fell 60' after his climbing strap was split by a tree. That is one lucky man to still be alive, let alone able to run a home improvement business.
I don't know why but we call those splits up from the cut "Barber chairs". No matter what you call them, they are very bad news. They usually do happen very fast and the only thing you can do at that point is hope your escape route is clear and your feet are fast running.

There are several techniques for preventing those but mostly involve plunge cuts and those have to be right on line. Once the tree splits, it's just a nightmare to deal with unless it comes all the way down or you have heavy equipment to knock it down.

Treefarmer
 

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I don't know why but we call those splits up from the cut "Barber chairs". No matter what you call them, they are very bad news. They usually do happen very fast and the only thing you can do at that point is hope your escape route is clear and your feet are fast running.

There are several techniques for preventing those but mostly involve plunge cuts and those have to be right on line. Once the tree splits, it's just a nightmare to deal with unless it comes all the way down or you have heavy equipment to knock it down.

Treefarmer
I've heard them called "Barber Poles" for the spiral split path many take up the tree ... and yes they are un predictable and dangerous.

Watching the videos, the ones that hit houses and cars, where no one got hurt are watchable ... where people got hurt, not easy to watch. Many are just not safety conscious. Spectators anywhere closer to the trunk within 150% the tree height IN ANY DIRECTION is a no-no. Watching out for yourself is hard enough, you got to be sure everyone else is a safe distance before you start the cut.

Chainsaws, ladders and beer are not a good combination.

Be safe, just my 2 cents.
 

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Some funny, stupid and maybe staged but not all.. it was mentioned that people probably got killed here and definitely hurt for sure.. I had a friend that was a professional tree arborist and he was hired by one of the local towns to cut this giant hemlock and he didn't like where it was situated near the power lines and he didn't even want to do the job that morning. Well he tied himself off around 40 feet or so (he was a climber too along with his bucket truck) and when the tree top came down it turned and snagged his safety harness and took him with it and he was electrocuted. he had the premonition and he should have heeded that inside warning but he didnt even with his wife's insistence and he's gone.. Even professional people get hurt and killed.. I don't like cutting with chainsaws near anything and you can bet I never go into the woods alone either.. Some of the guys around here may remember that accident and it was around 25+ years ago this happened and it was in Spencer Ma.

OSHA shows what can happen in our classroom training with tree cutting and it ain't pretty,, believe me, it's not. In fact none of their slides or videos are pretty at all... It's all about death to show you what can and does happen no matter how safe you think something is.. Some of the grossest are tree incidents.
Thanks Kenny for putting this out there.
 
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