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I see I've been cutting wrong all these years. I cut the "V" back into the tree just over 1/2 way. Then cut in from the opposite side slightly down to within 2" of the "V" which makes the hinge. Generally about at this point it starts falling.
 

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I see I've been cutting wrong all these years. I cut the "V" back into the tree just over 1/2 way. Then cut in from the opposite side slightly down to within 2" of the "V" which makes the hinge. Generally about at this point it starts falling.
I do the exact same thing as you just described. I think it helps the weight of the tree to fall itself where you want it. Is it the right way? I don’t know but I can get a pretty accurate direction that way without using a wedge most times. I have on occasion used the plunge cut through the middle for more accuracy. Helps those stubborn hardwoods to give way.
 

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Good video for the SIL to watch
 

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I see I've been cutting wrong all these years. I cut the "V" back into the tree just over 1/2 way. Then cut in from the opposite side slightly down to within 2" of the "V" which makes the hinge. Generally about at this point it starts falling.
I do the exact same thing as you just described. I think it helps the weight of the tree to fall itself where you want it. Is it the right way? I don’t know but I can get a pretty accurate direction that way without using a wedge most times. I have on occasion used the plunge cut through the middle for more accuracy. Helps those stubborn hardwoods to give way.
Going more than 1/3 with the hinge creates a very unsafe, unstable tree. It could fall before even making a back cut. And an angled back cut is equally as dangerous as the weight of the tree usually wants to pinch the kerf.

I agree with most of what he did. I think he left his hinges a little too big and he didn't use his wedges enough to support the back cut and then bring the roped tree down.

It was nice to see him wearing a helmet but you really need to wear chaps or chainsaw pants. Chainsaws can be very dangerous and disaster can strike before you know it.
 

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I see I've been cutting wrong all these years. I cut the "V" back into the tree just over 1/2 way. Then cut in from the opposite side slightly down to within 2" of the "V" which makes the hinge. Generally about at this point it starts falling.
1/2 way can be dicey, especially if there's unsound wood in the middle. I think most recommendations are the 1/3rd that's mentioned.

A straight back cut is fine for a tree that's not leaning but can lead to barber chair on a leaning tree. You have to be pretty careful on a plunge cut- as the video showed it's easy to miss and cut into the hinge or cut high or low on the plunge. It also takes a reasonably sized tree so the plunge doesn't take out too much wood.

I thought it was a pretty good video although I'd question using a chain saw in shorts. I guess it's easier to see where the blood is coming from if you slip up with the saw, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Something not mentioned was wind. Any air movement can be beneficial or detrimental. And to fully take wind into consideration the size of the canopy must be considered as well as MPH. Some days where I live felling trees wouldn't even be considered. He possibly doesn't live in a wind prone area.
 

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I find this guy hard to watch, his techniques are sophomoric and use of improper terminology such as "wedge" vs a face cut is poor when you are attempting to teach someone something. The real horrible thing all novice fellers do is failure to look up when cutting the tree. Everything that will kill you is above you and if you are cutting down trees, you should be proficient enough with a saw so that you don't have to look at it.

If you really want to see good tutorials, watch this series by Terry Hale. He doesn't look like a woodsman but his explanation, technique and explanation of the physics involved is second to none.


My two cents on proper face cuts is do the descending cut first, then you can look down the cut just made and see exactly where the bar is so the face is not under cut or overcut. A face should be about 30-40% the diameter of the tree.
 

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Great information

rob
 

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size of notch depends upon the situation. and what your cutting for.
dropping a leaner in the direction of the lean, small notch, maybe 10-20% is enough
dropping the tree thats a valuable lumber tree? keep the notch to a min., keep the hinge small and maybe even under cut the middle of it to reduce pulled fibers.
vast majority of the time wedges are not needed if the tree is read correctly.
Different trees also need/use bigger or smaller hinge wood.

Sorry if my use of "notch" offends, common language I've heard all my life, never heard of a "face cut" till a couple of years ago.. Potato, Potatoe whatever floats your boat.
 

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If you really want to see good tutorials, watch this series by Terry Hale. He doesn't look like a woodsman but his explanation, technique and explanation of the physics involved is second to none.
That's an excellent series of tutorials! (y)
 

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I have been cutting down trees for 50 years and am always still learning something useful. You might want to learn how to cut a Sizwell and a triple hinge to side drop heavy leaners. Straight drop of heavy leaners requires correct hinging and a plunge cut, leaving holding wood in the back to keep the tree from splitting and maybe even a barber chair- important in saving lumber. This was one of my first major mistakes with huge oak 45 years ago. Leaners can be especially dangerous for a non-professional. Buckets and cranes are taking over in my area. Old tree dropping skills are fading.
 

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I have been cutting down trees for 50 years and am always still learning something useful. You might want to learn how to cut a Sizwell and a triple hinge to side drop heavy leaners. Straight drop of heavy leaners requires correct hinging and a plunge cut, leaving holding wood in the back to keep the tree from splitting and maybe even a barber chair- important in saving lumber. This was one of my first major mistakes with huge oak 45 years ago. Leaners can be especially dangerous for a non-professional. Buckets and cranes are taking over in my area. Old tree dropping skills are fading.

Can't agree more.

Leaners are dangerous and novices fail to see this as it is obvious what way the tree is going to go. Leaners do well with a bore cut. I like a "T" back cut in preparation for the felling cut. If that is used, it must be cut very quickly with a big saw and sharp chain, do not hesitate.
 

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That's an excellent series of tutorials! (y)

The guy just doesn't look like a serious feller but the math and physics he explains are worth looking at. Especially when you see someone attempting to pull a 36" DBH leaning tree the other direction with a 400# tensile strength rope and their pick me up truck.
 

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A man has to know his limits. I let the dangerous cuts to the pros!

This bad boy was so tall that the top needed to be rigged down from his 92' Ommelift. Then he fiddled with winching the rest down since the choice was to either be careful or to have the wood land on the house or the wellhead. My buddy always talks me through what he's doing since he knows I'm interested in how he does his job. He knew the middle was probably not solid at the base.

Look at that hinge!

Wood Organism Trunk Natural landscape Grass


Branch Wood Organism Water Terrestrial plant



Now being turned into good firewood along with some other fine timber!

Brown Wood Trunk Twig Natural material
 

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size of notch depends upon the situation. and what your cutting for.
dropping a leaner in the direction of the lean, small notch, maybe 10-20% is enough
dropping the tree thats a valuable lumber tree? keep the notch to a min., keep the hinge small and maybe even under cut the middle of it to reduce pulled fibers.
vast majority of the time wedges are not needed if the tree is read correctly.
Different trees also need/use bigger or smaller hinge wood.

Sorry if my use of "notch" offends, common language I've heard all my life, never heard of a "face cut" till a couple of years ago.. Potato, Potatoe whatever floats your boat.

I agree. Everything is different and there is no one size fits all strategy.

Cutting for lumber, especially high dollar that may make veneer grade is a whole different subject and the skill required is the next level. Pulled fiber on the stump or when bucking logs on the landing are absolute NO NOs.

Friends of mine have a logging company and I get log cut offs from them for firewood. Watching the fellers is impressive. They don't carry wedges and often don't put in a face. Not something I would recommend.

Snow Plant Tree People in nature Wood
Wood Bedrock Slope Landscape Geological phenomenon
Wood Tree Bedrock Natural landscape Trunk
Sky Wood Helmet Workwear Landscape
Sky Wood Logging Trunk Biome
 

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