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Had something happen twice now, just curious for some input from some of y'all that may be more mechanically inclined.

There is a gas station on the way home from work that I've only stopped at twice to gas up my work truck because I forgot to stop in town.

Here's the sequence....The truck has been running normally, I kill the engine and fill up, the truck starts fine and immediately stalls. It then cranks for little while, starts, and idles roughly for a few seconds before returning to normal, with no further problems through the course of using that tank of fuel.

This has never happened at any other station, but has happened both times I've gotten gas here. What's going on??? F-150, if that helps.

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Hi traffic gas station? Water in their tanks?
 

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When you fill the tank are you topping it off? I think I read somewhere that if you top off the tank it is bad for the vapor reclaiming system. With all these newer vehicles you are not supposed to top them off - once it clicks of stop there.

I had to have a talk with the manager at my regular gas station. Some employees were topping off the tanks and/or trying to gring it to an even a dollar amount. Can’t do that anymore.
 

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When you fill the tank are you topping it off? I think I read somewhere that if you top off the tank it is bad for the vapor reclaiming system. With all these newer vehicles you are not supposed to top them off - once it clicks of stop there.

I had to have a talk with the manager at my regular gas station. Some employees were topping off the tanks and/or trying to gring it to an even a dollar amount. Can’t do that anymore.
No sir, not topping it off. I've found it spills gas if I even attempt it

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Not very much traffic. They $0.30 higher than the stations in town. Water may be a possibility.
It is not water,, or,,, you would be quoting how each tow truck ride cost $75,,, :flag_of_truce:
 

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The fuel is most likely badly aerated when being pumped / transferred into your tank. This affects your fuel pumps ability to pressurize your system until the air bubbles in the fuel subside.

They may have a leak in the piping on the intake side within the tank. It’s sucking air.


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Discussion Starter #9
The fuel is most likely badly aerated when being pumped / transferred into your tank. This affects your fuel pumps ability to pressurize your system until the air bubbles in the fuel subside.

They may have a leak in the piping on the intake side within the tank. It’s sucking air.


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I didn't think to mention that the pump seems abnormally fast. Related to bubbles in the gas or maybe cavitating or something?

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I don't know what you have for fuel in LA. Pretty much everywhere now has ethanol in the fuel unless it is recreational gas. Is that the case in LA?

If so I doubt water is the cause. Even if low on fuel, it would take a while to burn through the fuel in the fuel lines and filter to get the fuel to the engine and cause it to stall. Also for those of us up north that are old enough to remember the days before ethanol was common in fuel, we used to have to add HEET or other Isopropyl alcohol additives to the fuel. The alcohol is added to bond with the water and pull it through the system so it doesn't freeze in the lines and cause issues. The ol in Enthanol means it is an alcohol and it does the same thing that Isopropyl Alcohol did. This is why gas stations when from selling cases of the stuff a day down to they might have a couple of dusty bottles sitting in the mini automotive section. While I am not a fan of Ethanol, the one positive side effect is that we don't have to mess with HEET or other additives for water anymore. Might need them for other reasons now though.

You mentioned the pump runs really fast. Can you set it at one click assuming you can lock the pump on? I have been in some parts of the country that don't allow fuel pump locks because they might cause an overflow I guess. If so can you try a lower setting? I guess it is possible that air is in the gas. It is possible that the bubbles are sucked through the lines quicker that the gas.

I had a vehicle do something like this once. Well slightly different. It would run fine. Pull up to the gas pump. Get out and fill. Then the car was really hard to start or wouldn't start at all. In that case it was a coolant temp sensor. The ECU would think that the engine was cold based on the coolant temp reading lower than it really was so it would put it in cold start mode when it was hot. This would cause the engine to flood. Of course if the car had been sitting for a few hours and it was actually cold it would start just fine. Only when I got out and tried to restart shortly after it was shut down like at a gas station or a quick stop at a store. In your case it seems limited to only this one gas station though so I don't think that is it.
 

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A 2011 F-150 V-8 in our fleet at work has this same exact problem, amongst many others due to age. The service tech at the local garage said it was the fuel pressure regulator. This truck has just shy of 195,000 mi on the clock and is slated for replacement in March so we elected not to repair. Might be something to check.
 

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we hear of that problem on ram trucks/jeeps a lot and is usually caused by either water in fuel like mentioned earlier or if it happens all the time there's a valve either built into the pump or tank that sticks and causes the charcoal canister to fill up with fuel instead of vapors then when started the purge solenoid turns on and pulls that fuel into the engine and causes it to stall or the customer is overfilling the tank next time you get gas there try not filling tank all the way and see if it happens it could also be the auto shutoff on the pump is not working properly and is causing tank to get overfilled before it turns off
 

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I have worked as a Regional Service Manager for a large convenience store chain for the past 34 years, and have seen a lot of fuel dispensed.

There are two types of tank dispensing systems for underground tanks. On both types of systems the piping is suspended approximately 6-8 inches off the bottom of the tank so no debris or water is picked up and sent to the actual dispensers. Unless, of course, the amount of water rises beyond that point. If that happens every customer will have issues and will be all over the station operator. One thing you never want to do is fill your vehicle when a transport is dumping fuel into a tank. That stirs up any water or sediment and can cause issues, Always wait a half hour after a dump for that to settle back out. Another huge issue is "phase separation" that sometimes occurs in ethanol blended fuel, that's a whole 'nuther story.

Submersible pump system lines to the fuel dispensers are always pressurized, they cannot pump any air unless the tank runs dry and there might be a very slight instance of air being picked up at that crucial point. Of course, no fuel would be pumped by any additional customer.

Suction systems are just that.........the fuel dispenser sucks the fuel from the storage tank. These types of dispensers have an air elimination valve that purges any air before
it gets to the nozzle.

I would agree with previous posts that this is probably a vehicle issue, not a station issue.
 

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Entirely possible that this is solely a vehicle issue. As much as I drive annually, and as many different stations that I may visit to get fuel, it seems to push the bounds of coincidence that 2/2 times at this station I have the same problem. But definitely not outside of the realm of possibility. Next time I have to stop there I will definitely try the suggestions to run the pump slower and maybe not fill up all the way just to see. Thanks for the input and suggestions ya'll. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Nozzle

Entirely possible that this is solely a vehicle issue. As much as I drive annually, and as many different stations that I may visit to get fuel, it seems to push the bounds of coincidence that 2/2 times at this station I have the same problem. But definitely not outside of the realm of possibility. Next time I have to stop there I will definitely try the suggestions to run the pump slower and maybe not fill up all the way just to see. Thanks for the input and suggestions ya'll. :thumbup1gif:
I would agree that since it only happens at that pump, it's probably somewhat pump related. The concept of the nozzle possibly filling the vapor canister seems reasonable in which case it's not exactly a pump problem, more like a nozzle/vehicle incompatibility. It will be interesting to hear what you experience with a partial fill and/or slower fill.

Treefarmer
 

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I would agree that since it only happens at that pump, it's probably somewhat pump related. The concept of the nozzle possibly filling the vapor canister seems reasonable in which case it's not exactly a pump problem, more like a nozzle/vehicle incompatibility. It will be interesting to hear what you experience with a partial fill and/or slower fill.

Treefarmer
I'll do my best to remember to update my results

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I have worked as a Regional Service Manager for a large convenience store chain for the past 34 years, and have seen a lot of fuel dispensed.
Good post. Here's a ?? not directly related to the OP's issue.
In your experience, when the currently dispensed grade of fuel varies from the last most recent dispense, how much fuel flows before the new selection comes out of the nozzle? What I'm trying to say is...I pull up to the pump on a dirt bike with a 2 gallon tank and want to fill it with 93 octane. It's likely that the most previously dispensed fuel was 87 octane. How much 87 do I get before the 93 appears? Is it just the amount that's in the hose, between the nozzle and the pump? Or does it go further than that?

If I'm filling a can for in the trailer or to make a 2t mix, I always run off a gallon into a can for the mower before I put 93 into the bike can. When riding to the pump you can't do that.
 

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Good post. Here's a ?? not directly related to the OP's issue.
In your experience, when the currently dispensed grade of fuel varies from the last most recent dispense, how much fuel flows before the new selection comes out of the nozzle? What I'm trying to say is...I pull up to the pump on a dirt bike with a 2 gallon tank and want to fill it with 93 octane. It's likely that the most previously dispensed fuel was 87 octane. How much 87 do I get before the 93 appears? Is it just the amount that's in the hose, between the nozzle and the pump? Or does it go further than that?

If I'm filling a can for in the trailer or to make a 2t mix, I always run off a gallon into a can for the mower before I put 93 into the bike can. When riding to the pump you can't do that.
You are correct, what ever is in the hose and all the way back to the internal meter for the newly requested product is what you will receive first. This is on single hose dispensers, multi-hose dispensers with one hose dedicated per product will not have this issue. The actual amount varies according to hose and piping length and dispenser design. A pint or so would be a good guess.
 
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