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90% of my 1025R tractor use will be for my small Landscaping business. So obviously I want a tire that will do the least amount of damage to the clients lawn. My question is, do turf tires lessen the quality of usage for the Backhoe? Just trying to find the right balance.
 

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Haven’t had my TLB long enough to speak to turf tires, but my previous 1025R non-TLB had turf tires and I never had any issues in snow or wet ground. That being said I was nervous about R4’s on my lawn and have had zero issues on lawn. From my experience if you’re moving across wet ground turf tires do just as much damage as R4’s on this sized unit.


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90% of my 1025R tractor use will be for my small Landscaping business. So obviously I want a tire that will do the least amount of damage to the clients lawn. My question is, do turf tires lessen the quality of usage for the Backhoe? Just trying to find the right balance.
Having a 1025r with R4's, I would say the turf tires would definitely be easier on the lawns, etc. R4's leave quite an in-print on regular lawns, even just driving over it but part of that is the weight of the machine.

I leave my pallet forks on a pallet and put them on the tractor maybe once a week. I have grooves in the grass from simply driving straight in and getting the forks and backing straight back. That's one of many reasons why i don't use my 1 series to mow......

As far as the backhoe use goes, I doubt the tire would compromise the use of the backhoe as you are usually excavating from fairly stable ground.....note the term "usually." I don't have a backhoe, but having used on on tractors and other small excavators, I have usually dug my way staying on stable ground. Others may use different approaches.

One HUGE benefit of the R4's is they are a tougher tire for punctures and if you are often in rocky or stubble type areas, you might have more trouble with tire punctures with the turfs. I just added a liquid sealant to my tires for a small air leak and the sealant also is supposed to plug any punctures as well, I guess we will see.
 

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90% of my 1025R tractor use will be for my small Landscaping business. So obviously I want a tire that will do the least amount of damage to the clients lawn. My question is, do turf tires lessen the quality of usage for the Backhoe? Just trying to find the right balance.
Answering your question directly - the tires have nothing to do with backhoe operation. When operating the backhoe the weight of the tractor is supported with the outriggers and bucket.

For your application - if doing all work on and around finished lawns - I think turf tires would be a good fit.
 

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I too, have a landscaping biz, I run R3's (turfs) exclusively on my 2520.


If your landscaping gigs require the heavier R4's, a SCUT/MCUT/CUT isn't the appropriate machine for the job to begin with. :hide:
 

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IMO Where we live I would never own a 4x4 tractor with Turf tires...

FIL ordered his MF 1655 years and years ago with turf tires. First evening we came home from work, went out to mow the back yards, slid from the top of the hill to the bottom. Put chains on the tractor and has never had the chains off the tractor (mower ) till he replaced the turfs with R1 tractor tires.


Go with the R4 ,,, I just used my in a friends yard digging out for a side walk . Made probably 20 trips in front lawn and his back yard taking away the dirt I had removed plus gravel from the driveway. You can't tell I was in his yard.
 

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Don't worry about R4's digging up turf. If you search YouTube, you'll find some tests that prove it. I will also agree by personal experience. What R4's will provide VS turf is traction under load. You can bet your hard earned dollar that R4's will perform better than turf on pulling/pushing applications, such as the loader. Backhoe work, doesn't really matter.

Get R4's. You won't regret it.
 

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I agree with the comments on the use of R4's, if you are conscience of them and don't turn and accelerate with them, you'll be fine. Full dis-closer, I don't mow with my tractor, but I have driven over my lawn with R4's many time, and some times over the same spots and never had the any problems with tearing up the lawn. Here is the one of the video's to set you at ease... Also, as stated, using the backhoe, you will be using the stabilizers on the hoe and the bucket when in use, the stabilizers will cause more damage than the R4's will and the tires will not really be in play.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PrToFy3DHQM
 

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Answering your question directly - the tires have nothing to do with backhoe operation. When operating the backhoe the weight of the tractor is supported with the outriggers and bucket.

For your application - if doing all work on and around finished lawns - I think turf tires would be a good fit.
Yup :good2:
 
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I had turf tires on my X748 when I owned it and I now have R4's on my 1025R. I mowed with my X748 and I mow with my 1025R. Both tires will flatten the grass when you drive over the grass, but then, any tractor with weight will do that.

Does the R4 tire cause any damage to grass or yard, I have found not. I have found no visible difference in my yard between my X748 and 1025R concerning tire marks in the yard.

Now, are turf tires designed for grass mowing, yes. So, if you are only going to mow lawn, then turf tires are probably the correct tire.

Concerning BH usage with a turf tire. It probably doesn't matter with a BH whether you have turf or R4 tires, although, if you are digging a trench and you are moving the BH during the process of digging, you are eventually going to drive over rocks, depending on your soil type.

I was very glad I had R4's when I dug all of the trenches for utility lines when I built my garage. R4's are a much more rugged tire.
 

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Answering your question directly - the tires have nothing to do with backhoe operation. When operating the backhoe the weight of the tractor is supported with the outriggers and bucket.

For your application - if doing all work on and around finished lawns - I think turf tires would be a good fit.
Couldn't say it better than this
 

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You could try HDAPs. I'm loving mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I too, have a landscaping biz, I run R3's (turfs) exclusively on my 2520.


If your landscaping gigs require the heavier R4's, a SCUT/MCUT/CUT isn't the appropriate machine for the job to begin with. :hide:


Very good point.
I should’ve given a little more info too. Living in Oklahoma we rarely have snow and when we do no one clears it, the whole state just shuts down. ?. And I won’t be mowing with it. 90% of my tractor use will be moving Topsoil, Rocks etc. and digging trenches to install French drains / Retaining walls.
 

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Very good point.
I should’ve given a little more info too. Living in Oklahoma we rarely have snow and when we do no one clears it, the whole state just shuts down. ?. And I won’t be mowing with it. 90% of my tractor use will be moving Topsoil, Rocks etc. and digging trenches to install French drains / Retaining walls.
In that case - moving a lot of heavy stuff with the loader, r4’s might be better because of the much heavier side wall.
 

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Very good point.
I should’ve given a little more info too. Living in Oklahoma we rarely have snow and when we do no one clears it, the whole state just shuts down. ?. And I won’t be mowing with it. 90% of my tractor use will be moving Topsoil, Rocks etc. and digging trenches to install French drains / Retaining walls.
Between the lifting limits of the 220R loader, the cycle times of the FEL and the backhoe operation, the limited reach of the backhoe requiring the machine to be moved often and the size of even the 53" material bucket for moving material, I think this machine is going to be inefficient for business production purposes.

In business, time is money. With the capital cost of Deere's equipment only at $16.66 per month in payment per $1,000 of debt, I would buy a larger machine with greater lift capacity, faster hydraulic pump speed for implement cycle times, etc.

Yes, going to a 2032R or 2038R is going to be more money but if the 1025r with FEL and Backhoe was going to be $21,000 and the 2038R with FEL and Backhoe is going to cost you $36,000, you are talking about a monthly payments of $600 for the 2038R where the 1025R would be $350. A $250 a month payment difference is peanuts in business. With a machine which would likely be nearly TWICE as efficient at transporting material, off loading pallets, digging with the backhoe, etc. etc. your operating efficiency would be night and day different.

A job which might take you 30 hours with the 1025r will very likely take you 20 hours or less with a 2032R or 2038R. Even if you work alone, assuming you have 160 hours a month for site work, the larger machine would permit you to complete 8 projects per month verses just over 5 projects with the smaller machine. Working on average of 40 hours per week, the payment for a larger machine comes down to $1.57 per hour more than the smaller machine. You don't want to buy the 1 series to learn it's not practical and then have to trade up for what you need. That's a costly error you want to avoid whether a homeowner or in business.

The 1 series is a "Swiss Army Knife" of tractors for the homeowner. It can do a whole bunch of things to be very helpful and is better than doing these tasks by hand. But the homeowner isn't on the productivity time clock that someone in business is. Just as the Swiss Army knife could cut meat in the restaurant kitchen, there isn't a professional chef alive who would choose the Swiss Army knife over a professional cutlery set to get the job done day after day.
 

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Good cost of capital analysis, Sully! My only counter to the OP "going bigger" would be whether or not the larger tractor would fit into tight residential spaces that the OP might be operating in.
 

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Between the lifting limits of the 220R loader, the cycle times of the FEL and the backhoe operation, the limited reach of the backhoe requiring the machine to be moved often and the size of even the 53" material bucket for moving material, I think this machine is going to be inefficient for business production purposes.

In business, time is money. With the capital cost of Deere's equipment only at $16.66 per month in payment per $1,000 of debt, I would buy a larger machine with greater lift capacity, faster hydraulic pump speed for implement cycle times, etc.

Yes, going to a 2032R or 2038R is going to be more money but if the 1025r with FEL and Backhoe was going to be $21,000 and the 2038R with FEL and Backhoe is going to cost you $36,000, you are talking about a monthly payments of $600 for the 2038R where the 1025R would be $350. A $250 a month payment difference is peanuts in business. With a machine which would likely be nearly TWICE as efficient at transporting material, off loading pallets, digging with the backhoe, etc. etc. your operating efficiency would be night and day different.

A job which might take you 30 hours with the 1025r will very likely take you 20 hours or less with a 2032R or 2038R. Even if you work alone, assuming you have 160 hours a month for site work, the larger machine would permit you to complete 8 projects per month verses just over 5 projects with the smaller machine. Working on average of 40 hours per week, the payment for a larger machine comes down to $1.57 per hour more than the smaller machine. You don't want to buy the 1 series to learn it's not practical and then have to trade up for what you need. That's a costly error you want to avoid whether a homeowner or in business.

The 1 series is a "Swiss Army Knife" of tractors for the homeowner. It can do a whole bunch of things to be very helpful and is better than doing these tasks by hand. But the homeowner isn't on the productivity time clock that someone in business is. Just as the Swiss Army knife could cut meat in the restaurant kitchen, there isn't a professional chef alive who would choose the Swiss Army knife over a professional cutlery set to get the job done day after day.



The only reason I run a 2520 commercially, besides owning it, is how it can get into smaller yards and doesn't destroy turf like a skid steer. There's nothing it can do that I couldn't do by hand, but I can actually run a twelve hour day solo (versus running out of steam around the seven hour mark, manually). Even then, I am wishing at times for the smaller 1025R *sans backhoe*.

In terms of digging, a mini-ex will be about a 100x quicker. Dig-move-dig-move... Compare that to the backhoe which means switching seats, outriggers up/down, bucket up/down, park brake on/off, etc.
 

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No the tires have nothing to do with the backhoe other than the weight of the bh on them. I have R4 tires on mine and I never take the Fel or the bh off. Even when I mow. The only time i have any issues with the tires leaving marks in the yard is after a heavy rain or if there is standing water and I drive across it instead of waiting. Ihave moved 100s of yards of dirt and big boulders and trees around my property and the neighbors and never had issues with the R4 tires. I live in a rock filled area so the tires take a beating. I am looking at the HDAP tires only because i have a bad back and looking for a little smoother ride. In my opinion they are still aggressive and tougher than the regular turf tires and for what you are doing those or the R4 are better than the regular turfs. I have read many threads about the turfs being to slick on hills or the snow and people needing chains. My father has hills with regular turf tires on his tractor and I slid that all the way down his lawn on just wet grass. Never again...

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Between the lifting limits of the 220R loader, the cycle times of the FEL and the backhoe operation, the limited reach of the backhoe requiring the machine to be moved often and the size of even the 53" material bucket for moving material, I think this machine is going to be inefficient for business production purposes.

In business, time is money. With the capital cost of Deere's equipment only at $16.66 per month in payment per $1,000 of debt, I would buy a larger machine with greater lift capacity, faster hydraulic pump speed for implement cycle times, etc.

Yes, going to a 2032R or 2038R is going to be more money but if the 1025r with FEL and Backhoe was going to be $21,000 and the 2038R with FEL and Backhoe is going to cost you $36,000, you are talking about a monthly payments of $600 for the 2038R where the 1025R would be $350. A $250 a month payment difference is peanuts in business. With a machine which would likely be nearly TWICE as efficient at transporting material, off loading pallets, digging with the backhoe, etc. etc. your operating efficiency would be night and day different.

A job which might take you 30 hours with the 1025r will very likely take you 20 hours or less with a 2032R or 2038R. Even if you work alone, assuming you have 160 hours a month for site work, the larger machine would permit you to complete 8 projects per month verses just over 5 projects with the smaller machine. Working on average of 40 hours per week, the payment for a larger machine comes down to $1.57 per hour more than the smaller machine. You don't want to buy the 1 series to learn it's not practical and then have to trade up for what you need. That's a costly error you want to avoid whether a homeowner or in business.

The 1 series is a "Swiss Army Knife" of tractors for the homeowner. It can do a whole bunch of things to be very helpful and is better than doing these tasks by hand. But the homeowner isn't on the productivity time clock that someone in business is. Just as the Swiss Army knife could cut meat in the restaurant kitchen, there isn't a professional chef alive who would choose the Swiss Army knife over a professional cutlery set to get the job done day after day.

Excellent points and I agree. But I need to give a little more context My landscaping business is part time. I’m a Youth Pastor full time and do Landscaping 5-7 days a month to supplement my income. A larger tractor would just stretch my budget too much.
 

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Very good point.
I should’ve given a little more info too. Living in Oklahoma we rarely have snow and when we do no one clears it, the whole state just shuts down. ?. And I won’t be mowing with it. 90% of my tractor use will be moving Topsoil, Rocks etc. and digging trenches to install French drains / Retaining walls.
R4's are then the only way to go!!!!! IMO, I wouldn't even consider turf tires, considering what you are going to do with the tractor.
 
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