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I was pulling some small trees out the other day and decided to try and see if I could pull out this larger stump that I had cut really close to the ground about 6 months ago, I didn't think the tractor would do it but I figured it would just spin the tires. I didn't think the trans would "stall", I know the angle was putting some serious down pressure on the back tires but I was just surprised. Is this typical of a Hydrostatic Transmission? Anyway I included a successful attempt in the video as well.


 

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First off you got some Ba**s pulling on something that could come loose all at once...not something I want to try. That thing could have been a head grubber. Back to the question. I could easily see some smaller trees giving a 1025 a hard time. Hell, I had a Gehl skidsteer that couldn't push over a 6" oak but could push a 16" pine over no problem. Trans would stall out and finally stall the motor on the 6" oak. Some trees have more roots and deeper tap root. Just depends on the type of tree your working with.
 
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Big is right. Don’t ever forget pulling things like this is a dangerous activity, even when done right. We all do it, just be careful. Now, to your question. Roots are some powerful things. I have many, and I mean many, that will bring my 2038R to a halt. Hell, I rented a 12000 pound excavator and had some bring it to a stop. Roots are tough. Evolution has designed them to grow deep and hang on to the ground. Your tractor is fine, this is very normal. In this case, you have to dig some and cut a few of the root leads until you weaken it enough to come out. Keep on tractoring.

One more thing, I like to pull from the 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, and 9:00 position on these stubborn roots. Sometimes pulling from different sides, it will break enough of the roots underground to come out.
 
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Stumps are tough for all tractors, small or large, which is another reason I have a Backhoe. It also depends on the tree type and the root structure. First, your chain needs to be shorter for several reasons. One safety. Should it break it doesn't take your head off or other limbs. Second, it give you leverage. In the one you had a hard time pulling out, I would have backed as close to the stump as possible, lowered your attachment on your 3pt hitch. The attach your chain to your hook. Then while pulling, raise the 3pt hitch at the same time your moving forward. This does a couple of things, your using the weight of the tractor to pull vertical on the stump, at the same time your pulling horizontal on the stump with the power of the tractor and you can backup and go forward at the same time. Not too many stumps can take that abuse. This safer for you and the tractor and you get more traction as you apply pressure to the stump.
 

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I'm confused, how could this come lose all at once? Chain with clamps? Wouldn't it slide before snapping? and I dont see a problem with elasticity. I'm missing something in reference to the danger. Educate me.
 

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Pulling from the 3pt is never a good idea. It is higher than the axle and can rotate the front up. Always pull from the draw bar. Also, the 3pt is kind of a weak place when it comes to snatching immovable objects.

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
 

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From the video it looks like you were in high gear. In high, the transmission will in fact "stall" under such circumstances.
 

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I'm confused, how could this come lose all at once? Chain with clamps? Wouldn't it slide before snapping? and I dont see a problem with elasticity. I'm missing something in reference to the danger. Educate me.
This guy didn't see a problem with chain elasticity/stored energy either...payed the ultimate price too. https://youtu.be/ETFFeUoq5Vw
 
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welp, there goes all of my chains... anyone need some good unused chains!?+
Hahaha! Don't get rid of em yet. When you pull with anything, just be careful, lay something heavy over the chain/rope to keep it low in the event of breaking. I just don't like pulling on anything with that amount of force. Dig it out with the bucket.
 
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My question was more about the Tractors/transmissions performance not so much the the technique of pulling trees out. I've pulled out lots of small trees and bushes with my truck, but since I have only had this tractor for a month I had no experience with it capabilities and performance. The tractor was defiantly in low range and when the clamp did fall off it maybe went 6 inches so I wasn't that worried about it hitting me but I get it, better safe than sorry. Like I stated before I didn't expect the tractor to pull this stump out, I thought it would just spin the tires. Thank you for the replies and the concern for my safety. I will be more cautious in the future. :bigbeer:
 

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I've used the same grubber with my 2032R and had the same problem with the transmission kicking into bypass before the tires ever spin. Being in low range helps but you'll still have the same thing in some cases. That's one of the trade offs of having a hydro transmission. There are some techniques that help but you're always going to run into this at some point. Those little short stumps are a bear. As a general rule of thumb, for every inch the tree is in diameter, leave a foot of stump. A 2' tall stump allows you to attach the grubber at the top of it and then you can use the stump's length for leverage to pry the roots out of the ground.

And yeah, there are some safety issues. Be aware of them and mitigate them. A stall mat laid over the chain dampens a lot of shock if it snaps or the grubber pops loose. We'd all rather see ya back here posting videos of your successes than hear about you being laid up in a hospital! :cheers:
 

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I was pulling some small trees out the other day and decided to try and see if I could pull out this larger stump that I had cut really close to the ground about 6 months ago, I didn't think the tractor would do it but I figured it would just spin the tires. I didn't think the trans would "stall", I know the angle was putting some serious down pressure on the back tires but I was just surprised. Is this typical of a Hydrostatic Transmission? Anyway I included a successful attempt in the video as well.
My 2720 will do the same thing. Sometimes when I'm pulling a stump or something it will just sit there and "whine" at me. No tire spin, no engine lugging. It almost seems like the relief valve is opening too soon. Coming from a gear-driven tractor it is a bit disappointing as with the gear tractor when you release the clutch one of three things happens:

1. move forward
2. stall the engine
3. flip over backwards

Never did it just sit there whining like a little girl. :)
 

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My question was more about the Tractors/transmissions performance not so much the the technique of pulling trees out. Like I stated before I didn't expect the tractor to pull this stump out, I thought it would just spin the tires.
That would be the normal expectation. Especially since these little tractors typically don't have enough weight to put all of the engine HP to the ground.
 

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Pulling from the 3pt is never a good idea. It is higher than the axle and can rotate the front up. Always pull from the draw bar. Also, the 3pt is kind of a weak place when it comes to snatching immovable objects.
Actually, when used properly it is very unlikely to lift the front end when pulling with the 3PH. Pulling is what it was designed for. The geometry is such that the attachment is below the axle so the more you pull the more it keeps the front end down. The draw bar is located in a similar position.

However, I would disagree on the strength of each. The 3PH **WHEN PULLING PROPERLY** is stronger than the draw bar. The 3PH was designed to pull ground engaging implements. The draw bar on the other hand is typically secured with only a few bolts into the aluminum transmission housing. There have been reports of folks tearing the draw bar right out from under the tractor by pulling too hard.

Where most folks go wrong when pulling with the 3PH or the rear of the tractor is they secure the chain/strap higher than the axle, attaching it to the top-link holes in some cases. Or in other cases they secure it TO the axle which can be a recipe for a flip-over especially with a powerful tractor with larger rear tires.

But attaching to a draw bar mounted to the 3PH arms is very safe.
 
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I'm confused, how could this come lose all at once? Chain with clamps? Wouldn't it slide before snapping? and I dont see a problem with elasticity. I'm missing something in reference to the danger. Educate me.
I've done a lot of car recovery & (even nice looking) chains break & fly forward with FORCE. A heavy blanket thrown over chain helps.
 

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you aren't the first or last person to be surprised trying to rip out a tree or shrub with a tractor, it's easy to underestimate how hard they come out.

I broke a 3/8 logging chain with my 1050, low gear 4wd, trying to pull out an overgrown arborvitae stump. I kept the broken link in my shop to show people.
 

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The tractor was defiantly in low range :
OP, I am not trying to argue with you, I just want to help you solve your problem!

Here is a capture from your video, and here are pics of my tractor in both low and high.

You were in high. Mystery solved. :) It's happened to me too...I thought I was in one and I was in the other. I think it happens to all of us.

So the reason your transmission "stalled" is because it was in high, and if you put a load on it and there isn't enough power, it "stalls."

highlow.jpg
 

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OP, I am not trying to argue with you, I just want to help you solve your problem!

Here is a capture from your video, and here are pics of my tractor in both low and high.

You were in high. Mystery solved. :) It's happened to me too...I thought I was in one and I was in the other. I think it happens to all of us.

So the reason your transmission "stalled" is because it was in high, and if you put a load on it and there isn't enough power, it "stalls."

View attachment 564425
Good eye, Mike. Freakin Perry Mason!
 
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OP, I am not trying to argue with you, I just want to help you solve your problem!

Here is a capture from your video, and here are pics of my tractor in both low and high.

You were in high. Mystery solved. :) It's happened to me too...I thought I was in one and I was in the other. I think it happens to all of us.

So the reason your transmission "stalled" is because it was in high, and if you put a load on it and there isn't enough power, it "stalls."

View attachment 564425
I apologize, you are correct I had repositioned the tractor for my final attempt and must have left it in High. I did try two time before the last attempt and as you can see in the video it was in low and the result was much of the same, maybe a hint of a wheel starting to spin before it would "stall"

 
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