Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When pulling some of my hills with the Bush hog my 2032R is bogging down. When it hits a thick spot or the hill steepens a bit, the rpm will pull back to around 2000 rpm and I'll have to back off on forward motion to let the engine and pto rpms come back up.
Thinking about upgrading to the 2038R for the increased horsepower.
Anyone here run into this and upgraded? Will the extra 6hp make THAT much difference?
Am I doing any harm to the engine bogging it down?
The 3039R is only 1hp over the 2038R and if more than 5 inches or so taller with the rops down than the 2032 frame, it won't fit under the shop door where I store it.

Or don't worry about it and just spend a few extra minutes getting the job done?

Thanks for any insights or personal experiences.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,672 Posts
If it were ME I would simply slow down slightly in the thick stuff. I can't see six "brochure" HP revolutionizing your bush hogging experience. If you do decide to upgrade, perhaps a 3049R would be more appropriate. That would give you a nearly 50% increase in PTO horsepower.

But if it were ME and the tractor was doing everything else you asked of it.... I'd just slow down a bit through the thick stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
How big is the bush hog? I wouldnt worry bout it luggn down to 2000 once in awhile
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
Will the extra 6hp make THAT much difference?.
No.

Both will bog down. The 38 will bog down less, and if you have two of them next to each other doing the same thing, you will notice a small difference. If you don't, you won't. You will lose all that money in the trade, then go up that same hill and you'll be like, "Wait! It's bogging down too! Nooooo!"

You should always back off the forward pedal in a hydro when you start bogging down when brush hogging (or doing anything else), it's normal. Your tractor will find a new speed at which it is comfortable.

So like...with the 32 you'll go from say 5 mph to 4 mph. With the 38 you will go from 5 mph to 4.3 mph.

If you want to see a difference you can feel you'd need something like a 3046R running THAT SAME brushog. If you get a bigger brush hog, you may not notice any difference then, though you'll be cutting a wider path.

HP matters a lot to commercial operators. You won't notice the difference between 4 mph and 4.3 mph, but if you are brush hogging all day for money, you will notice spending 9 hours instead of 10 at the customer's site for the same pay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
OK, seems like everyone has the same opinion and that's what I thought.
It's a 5' hog for the guy that asked.
And yep for now it's fine with all the other tasks and chores.
Just wanted to make sure it wasn't hurting the engine.

So I'll just hang in there and save the $$.
Thanks all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
OK, seems like everyone has the same opinion and that's what I thought.
It's a 5' hog for the guy that asked.
And yep for now it's fine with all the other tasks and chores.
Just wanted to make sure it wasn't hurting the engine.

So I'll just hang in there and save the $$.
Thanks all.
FYI, I run a 6' hog on my 2032 with no problems. It chews stuff up impressively well. I couldn't really ask for better performance. And my land is nothing but nasty hills and nasty weeds/shrubs.

You aren't hurting the engine at all (particularly if you let off a little and let it catch up), what you feel is the governor doing its best to maintain engine speed under load and not being able to keep up. Consequently, the RPM drops as the load increases. This is something you will experience with every tractor you will ever own.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rtgt and goat704!

·
Registered
Joined
·
937 Posts
The 2038r might bog down but if it does it will be substantially less than the 2032r. 15% is a lot of extra horsepower and torque. This is why I always buy the most power per frame size. I can’t stand running out of power, time is money. Those who say it won’t make much of a difference must not have that much experience with tractors of various horsepower pulling implements. If you pay attention you can tell a huge difference in how much power you have by just putting a new air filter in...

I do, however, agree with everyone that it’s too late to do anything. You’ll lose out on a lot of money. When it’s time to upgrade just make sure that you go for more power.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Fit Rite Hydraulics
Joined
·
669 Posts
Per JD specs.

2032R has 24.2 PTO horse power at 2500RPM.

2038R has 30.4 PTO horse power at 2500RPM.

I have no idea what the real world performance is, :unknown: but in my mind with an over 25% increase in power would result in a much larger performance span than what is being talked about here.

I agree as far as a home owner that has to deal with slowing down one a week or how ever often vs someone that deals with it daily. But the differences should most certainly be noticeable however often it has to be dealt with.


Just my 2 cents. :drinks:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
Neil Messick says, "a change of 10-20% in the horsepower of your tractor, in most applications, is probably not going to be noticeable" in this video: So you want to TRADE UP for a new Tractor? - TMT - YouTube

He then goes on to say, "I'd encourage guys to look for at least a 50% jump, if not a doubling, in a lot of tractor specifications."

Also, this absolutely hilarious Indian video shows the difference, in application, between a Turbo Arjun and an non-turbo Arjun (an Indian market Mahindra model). The difference is...100 RPM. The music alone makes this video worth watching. :)

TURBO ARJUN VS WITHOUT TURBO ARJUN WITH 20 DISC HARROW FULL OPEN - YouTube
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
Here, forget everything I said above. Just watch this video.

Does it look like I'm struggling for power? And two of the three passes shown here are uphill. One of them (the first one) a very steep hill.


I set out to prove a point and proved a different one instead without meaning to. You can't see it in the video (or maybe you can), but I'm actually going faster than I should be (except the first pass uphill) and leave behind a sloppy cut.

It's a tractor, not a race car. Go slow and easy and get it done right on the first pass.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,672 Posts
Here, forget everything I said above. Just watch this video.

Does it look like I'm struggling for power? And two of the three passes shown here are uphill. One of them (the first one) a very steep hill.
You should skip the background music so we can hear the engine. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Herminator

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
You should skip the background music so we can hear the engine. :)
I somehow thought the mic would pick up what I was saying and talked throughout. It was annoying so I covered it up. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Herminator

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
Just look at the PTO speed on the instrument cluster.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Herminator

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,480 Posts
When pulling some of my hills with the Bush hog my 2032R is bogging down. When it hits a thick spot or the hill steepens a bit, the rpm will pull back to around 2000 rpm and I'll have to back off on forward motion to let the engine and pto rpms come back up.
Thinking about upgrading to the 2038R for the increased horsepower.
Anyone here run into this and upgraded? Will the extra 6hp make THAT much difference?
Am I doing any harm to the engine bogging it down?
The 3039R is only 1hp over the 2038R and if more than 5 inches or so taller with the rops down than the 2032 frame, it won't fit under the shop door where I store it.

Or don't worry about it and just spend a few extra minutes getting the job done?

Thanks for any insights or personal experiences.
I never push it i always go slow when hoggin to insure everything gets cut cleanly and keep the engine rpm the same. If your trying to run a race and work your tractor they all will reach a point at which power has to be taken from the pto to try and maintan your high speed. With a gear tranny i most always use the lowest gear available and she just chuggs along growling a bit when she has an extra tough job like 6-7 foot high blavk berries. Kinda fun to watch them disapear under the tractor and fly out the back in tiny peices. I'm told the hydrostat is supposed to work the same. You set the engine speed and your foot controls the tractor speed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,955 Posts
Look at it this way, a 2038R has six more HP than a 2032R. That equals 6 HP difference OR ~20% more HP. 20% in my book is not insignificant. Torque comparison would be done similarly.

For comparison purposes, my Superduty has a 6.7 liter Powerstroke which produces 425 HP and 850 ft lbs of torque. That tows a whole lot better than the same Superduty equipped with a 6.2 liter gas engine with X% less HP and Q.

I’m not saying you need the 2038R. I am saying it has 20% more HP and it does make a difference.

Sincerely
 
  • Like
Reactions: Herminator

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
No.

Both will bog down. The 38 will bog down less, and if you have two of them next to each other doing the same thing, you will notice a small difference. If you don't, you won't. You will lose all that money in the trade, then go up that same hill and you'll be like, "Wait! It's bogging down too! Nooooo!"

You should always back off the forward pedal in a hydro when you start bogging down when brush hogging (or doing anything else), it's normal. Your tractor will find a new speed at which it is comfortable.

So like...with the 32 you'll go from say 5 mph to 4 mph. With the 38 you will go from 5 mph to 4.3 mph.

If you want to see a difference you can feel you'd need something like a 3046R running THAT SAME brushog. If you get a bigger brush hog, you may not notice any difference then, though you'll be cutting a wider path.

HP matters a lot to commercial operators. You won't notice the difference between 4 mph and 4.3 mph, but if you are brush hogging all day for money, you will notice spending 9 hours instead of 10 at the customer's site for the same pay.
The 3046R is what I would recommend too. I have a 3039R with a 72" MMM and it will drop 50 to 100 RPM in thick grass that's 8-10" tall. My PTO horsepower is a little over 31 I believe. If I had to do over again I would have gotten the 3046R for the extra ponies. I'm not sure it would have made much of a difference though. That's the best I could have done though since the 3046R is the biggest tractor that they offer with a mid mount PTO.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Herminator

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
When pulling some of my hills with the Bush hog my 2032R is bogging down. When it hits a thick spot or the hill steepens a bit, the rpm will pull back to around 2000 rpm and I'll have to back off on forward motion to let the engine and pto rpms come back up.
Thinking about upgrading to the 2038R for the increased horsepower.
Anyone here run into this and upgraded? Will the extra 6hp make THAT much difference?
Am I doing any harm to the engine bogging it down?
The 3039R is only 1hp over the 2038R and if more than 5 inches or so taller with the rops down than the 2032 frame, it won't fit under the shop door where I store it.

Or don't worry about it and just spend a few extra minutes getting the job done?

Thanks for any insights or personal experiences.
My vote!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
If it were ME I would simply slow down slightly in the thick stuff. I can't see six "brochure" HP revolutionizing your bush hogging experience. If you do decide to upgrade, perhaps a 3049R would be more appropriate. That would give you a nearly 50% increase in PTO horsepower.

But if it were ME and the tractor was doing everything else you asked of it.... I'd just slow down a bit through the thick stuff.
So as to not confuse the OP, I assume you are talking about the 3046R instead of the 3049R which isn't offered.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Herminator

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,527 Posts
Of course extra HP always makes a difference. 1 HP will make a difference. The question is, is it enough of a difference to matter for your application and to be worth it?

The 2038R runs a high strung turbo engine (though not nearly as high strung as the 3046R, whose turbo gives it a 50% HP boost!). More HP out of a smaller displacement (often considered a negative for tractors). The turbo sits between the exhaust header and the DPF, which while unlikely to cause problems, can cause catastrophic damage if it does fail. On top of that, the turbo has to be idled for at least two minutes after every time you work the engine hard (mow, brush hog, pull, etc.) or failure isn't a question of if, but when. How may 2038R owners do this? How many even know about this? You should, because it's in the owner's manual.

The 2032R on the other hand runs a de-tuned naturally aspirated engine. It's the same engine in a lot of 35-37HP tractors (e.g. Yanmar YT235) but with the fuel dialed down and the RPMs limited. It's also the same engine as in the 3033R. Any good diesel mechanic will tell you that a de-tuned diesel engine will last essentially forever. If it's not de-tuned, if JD is just underrating it, then it's a 35 hp engine (unlikely, but some guy on youtube put his 3023e on a PTO dino and got 30hp).

Then there's the fact that HP in tractors has only ONE BENEFIT. It lets you do things faster. But...should you do those things faster? Brush hogging faster results in an inferior cut. Snow blowing faster results in more snow pushed off to the side of the blower rather than fed through it (I have a video about this I shared before).

So yeah, it makes a difference, always does. But is that difference worth it? It may be for some. For anyone planning to keep their tractor forever may want to think twice though.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Herminator
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top