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Found a used 11KW Generac generator, model G0070310.

Lists 1,450.8 hours on the clock. Asking $1,200.

I live in country, have well water, propane heat, and heat-pump. Is 11kW enough to power most or all of the house?

Thoughts? Suggestions?
 

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Found a used 11KW Generac generator, model G0070310.

Lists 1,450.8 hours on the clock. Asking $1,200.

I live in country, have well water, propane heat, and heat-pump. Is 11kW enough to power most or all of the house?
Do you have an electric water heater? Or propane. We have propane heat, but an electric water heater. We shut the water heater and the well pump off when connecting the generator. Once things are running we turn on the pump breaker. But our genny is only half as big as the one you referenced 5.5KVA continuous. So, the 11KW unit should be fine. Your heat pump with be another fair sized load. Do you know what power it requires?

If we need to run our water heater, we shut other big loads off.

We have no fancy automatic transfer switch. Just a 200 amp double pole double throw switch to either connect to the generator or utility. But it's nice to have water, heat, lights, refrigerators and freezers during outages.
 

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Generac has a size calculator on their site that may help. However, if you focus on primary loads needed for living, it'll probably be fine.

I have a 1600 sqft house and a generac 16kw will power everything, even things not needed for living like TV and computer and even air conditioning. AC is a big load that may not be necessary.
 

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I would never connect the heat pump to the generator that small,,
the starting is WAY too hard on the motors,,

I have a 10KW generator on my welder, and connect it to my home,,
I just ran it last weekend for over half a day,,

We have a 250 foot deep well,, three refrigerators, and a freezer,,
and, we have electric hot water

The house runs perfectly, since I do not start the heat pump.

I have the generator on a breaker that is less than full generator rating,,
I would rather kick the breaker than run constantly at near generator capacity,,

We did have an issue when we first got a generator, 30 years ago,,

It seems that the way the house was wired, all of the refrigerators, and most everything we use when the power goes out, was wired to one leg of the 220 volts,,
The breaker kept kicking for what I thought was no reason,,

Well,, I borrowed a clip-on ammeter, and found the issue, moved a couple breakers to the other leg in the fuse box,, all became well again.

We love the generator,, back when I first got it,, I even noticed the generator gave a more stable voltage than the local co-op supplied.
The local co-op has fixed their grid over the years, so, they are about the same now.

We do have one other thing, that has already paid for itself in fuel savings,,
Harbor freight sells a 750 watt inverter that clips to a car battery.

When it is not cold, the 750 watt inverter will power much of what we need, without running the generator.

Computers, phone chargers, DSL adapter, computer router, and all the LED lamps we want to plug in,, all work perfectly

It even powers my wife's breathing machine,,
it will power any devise that has the little transformer that plugs into the wall,, very well.

We have used that for 10 hours, and the battery does not even seem to be effected.

We originally bought it for my wife's lift chair,, she could not get up easily when the power went out.
Then,, over time, we kept plugging in more, and more into the little thing,,
It is really great,, for $33,,, :good2:
 

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Our Generac is 8KW and we power this: Well, Freezer, Fridge, Furnace, Pellet Stove, Several Light circuits, Tv and satellite box, Computers, and microwave.

Not powered: some light circuits, air, electric stove.

There is a new transfer device out that will power the whole house but not everything at once. I believe it's called an intelligent controller. They didn't have that when we got ours. It turns off some circuits so that it can power others. So if the well isn't running it might turn it off for a few minutes so it can turn on the air. Not exactly sure how it works.

Ron
 

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Our Generac is 8KW and we power this: Well, Freezer, Fridge, Furnace, Pellet Stove, Several Light circuits, Tv and satellite box, Computers, and microwave.

Not powered: some light circuits, air, electric stove.

There is a new transfer device out that will power the whole house but not everything at once. I believe it's called an intelligent controller. They didn't have that when we got ours. It turns off some circuits so that it can power others. So if the well isn't running it might turn it off for a few minutes so it can turn on the air. Not exactly sure how it works.

Ron

We have that system on our generator,, here is a video that explains how it works,,,


:laugh:
 

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If your planning on using a generator you have to balance your loads, and by doing that you can run large items but it’s tough to run a whole house depending on your cabling. Most times anything over 8kw gen is a waste of money due to the hook up. I see a lot of people buy a large gen and then wire it with 10/3 and there is only so much watt/hr you can push through small cables, and using a good transfer switch makes it safer for your home and the linemen working outside. I don’t know what the start up costs on a heat pump is I’ve never measured mine but i have a more effective heat source for power down issues for that reason.





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I have a this Amazon.com : Champion 8000-Watt Dual Fuel Portable Generator with Electric Start : Garden Outdoor which on propane is 7250 continuous and 9025 surge. So you have more capacity than me. I put a generator outlet outside, connected to a 240v interlocked breaker in the panel. So I backfeed the panel and power the whole house with it as needed. I have a propane quick disconnect out there off the (2) 100 gallon tanks. Here's what I found while planning and testing this:


  • I can run all the typical lights and electronics at all times. All the lights in and out of the house are LEDs. The rest are computer, internet, TV, etc. The fridge cycling normally. This is my base load that i assume is "always on" regardless of what else I have on at the time.
  • In addition to the base load, I can have the well pump and electric hot water heater running at the same time. This maxes out the continuous load, but the generator doesn't flinch. So I can shower!
  • I have a portable AC unit (thing on wheels with the hose you stick out the window). This is what I would use to keep the house comfortable in the summer. No problem.
  • I have a propane fireplace I can use for heat if I cannot use the heat pump central air.
  • My 3.5 ton heat pump only uses about 2.5kw once it is running. I have not tried to make the compressor start on generator. I think it would probably work if I put a hard start capacitor on the compressor. If so, I could just use the AC normally in the summer very very easily.
  • If it will start the heat pump compressor, I could use the heat normally in the winter too since it is no different than the AC. BUT I would need to disconnect the electric auxiliary heat. The electric auxiliary is 10kw alone and I cannot use that obviously. Even if I simply disable the electric auxiliary in the thermostat, the defrost cycle will still try to use it so I would have to disconnect it. The defrost cycle would just have a chilly breeze once in a while.
  • Basically all the other appliances in the house I can use. I just need to be specific about what I am using at the time. I can use the oven, microwave, toaster, washer/dryer, etc. As long as I only use them one at a time. Which is totally fine.
  • The circuits in my house are already nicely balanced on the panel. So at no time does one leg have dramatically more than the other.

I keep the generator strapped to a pallet with the cord and propane hose. So I can snag it all with the tractor and bring it around the other side of the house as needed.



 

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I have a 5550 watt generator that I back-feed from my shed. It works for me because I don't need much to live fairly comfortably.. When we got hit with hurricane Erma I didn't have power for 8 days. I was running the generator for about 12 -15 hours a day on 5 gallons of gas at a cost of about $20 a day.. I was prepared with food and water and I also helped my neighbors with charging their phones, cold drinks and some snacks.. For cooking I have an electric frying pan and a gas grill. I ran a coffee pot, a small AC unit, frig, and a few lights with no problem..I even did a few loads of laundry.. I just hung the cloths out to dry.. We did have water most of the time because our neighborhood has backup generators for our well system.. I'll be getting it ready for this years hurricane season within the next couple of months... I'm even thinking of buying a backup just in case...
 

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I have a propane generac 10KW and it powers the house and the Rock N Roll barn, two separate buildings. we power the well, oil fired furnace (hot air 2 of them one in each building) all the plugs in the house/barn, electric stove for cooking, do not power the washing machine or dryer, no need, and two refrigerators. We do not use the TV, (Street cable boxes will not work without juice). It has an automatic transfer switch and we have never had an issue powering anything we want to use.
Use the system wisely and you will not have an issue. except for the heat pump, that may have an issue if other things are on at the same time that draw a large amount of current. If an issue just shut down circuit breakers you don't really need and you will have heat. Think of it this way; if you didn't have the generator you would be using lanterns or candles and listening to a battery operated radio.. Think of it that way, just power necessities. Nice to have water to flush toilets and heat to stay warm and a couple lights... well worth it in my opinion and that's not a lot of hours on the generator.
Jeff
 

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I have a GE 15K whole house generator that is hooked up to natural gas, so it actually runs at 14K efficiency. I have a lock out on one of the high demand appliances. The lock out will only supply power to the appliance if the generator has the available capacity. We never have to worry about overloading the generator.

If you choose wisely which appliances to use and employ a lock out panel or intellegent circuit, the short answer is yes.
 

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Found a used 11KW Generac generator, model G0070310.

Lists 1,450.8 hours on the clock. Asking $1,200.

I live in country, have well water, propane heat, and heat-pump. Is 11kW enough to power most or all of the house?

Thoughts? Suggestions?
That is a ton of hours for a "standby" generator.
 

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That is a ton of hours for a "standby" generator.
I agree.

Most standby generators if hooked to the house, will start them selves and run for anywhere from 15 to 45 minutes per week. Same time, same day, every week, 1,451 hours is the equivalent of running 60.5 days, 24 hours a day........

That's a lot of time on a standby generator.......for $1,200 in my opinion.
 

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That is pretty high hours for one of those, well past many maintenance points that may or may not have been done.

I’d look for something with less hours - have you priced a new unit? One or two $800 repairs and you may be way ahead with a brand new or at least much newer unit.
 

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I would agree with the others...that is a whole lot of hours.

I have a 13KW Honda gasoline portable (on wheels) that I utilize with a manual transfer switch. It'll run our entire home (7400 sq ft) and the beach house, less the AC and the electric water heaters. Our primary heating systems are forced air natural gas, so not a big load there. The water well pump starts fine and so do the sewage lift pumps. We have three refrigerators and two Coke machines. We two dryers, one electric and the other natural gas (three daughters). We don't utilize the electric dryer on the generator.

The first 10 years I owned the generator, we never used it other than my exercising it twice a year. I replaced two starting batteries without ever using the generator! We just never had an outage of such duration, less than 8 hours, that it was worth the effort of pulling it out. That changed in the summer of 2015. We had a super cell storm hit that had hurricane force winds. We were without power for a week. I'd start the generator in the morning around 6:30AM and it would run until about 8:00PM on a tank of gasoline. We'd leave it off for the night. The refrigerators/freezers would hold temp overnight without much of an issue. I also have three 30 gallon gas caddies and always make sure at least one is full to fuel the generator each day. A single 30 gallon gas caddy was enough for the week.

The following summer, 2016, nearly the same intensity of storm. We were without power four days.

We had our transformer fail at midnight this winter. I waited until morning to notify the power company (I know what it is like to be on-call) and with sub-zero outdoor temps, the home temp had dropped into to low 60s by then. So I rolled the generator out to bring the temp back up. The power was restored within four hours of my notification.
 
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