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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure where to post this so I am putting it here. I had three fantastic days and probably 10 hours of seat time this weekend. Lifted my ride on mower to change the blade (used jack stands for safety...), moved a freezer to the basement (which I dropped:wasntme:), cleared a path to the neighbors - ahh a good weekend - but spent most of my time clearing winter brush and moving it to a burn pile. Was wondering if there is any risk to the hydraulics etc when dumping wood on the burning pile with the grapple. I was careful, moved quickly and there appeared to be no issue but wondered if there are areas that would not do too well in the heat? My biggest concern was the hydraulic cylindar on the top of the grapple, but wondering if anything else could be at risk by doing this.

As an aside, the grapple has been well worth the money though I am ordering a balast box with extension as the filled tires and 550lb box blade is not enought to keep the rear end firmly on the ground. I find that it is real easy to pick up more than is fun to move with the grapple. I am hoping another 500 or so pounds will help with that.

Thank You - Dana
 

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I think you will be fine. Piling on a burning pile requires just what you said you did, finesse and quickness. If there is no oil leaking, you done good.

I have piled on top of brush piles while burning with log loaders and grapple skidders with no adverse effects other than some smoke stain after a bit.

One thing I did learn that could happen though is when placing debris on a burning pile, billions of burning little embers and sparks love to find places in/on machines to REALLY create some excitement by making smoke from areas where there should not be any.......from smoldering away themselves or in pockets on the machine where debris and things have built up over time:eek2: .
 

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I think it's fine also...but remember that the hood on your machine is plastic so those flying embers can do some damage!
 

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I've used my B21 to work a lot of brush piles. Most were about 5-6' tall, and 20 to 30 feet in diameter. Before the burn, I lift the hood and blow out everything I can with a leaf blower.

While the pile is burning, I put stuff on but just on the edge is fine. I have clamp on forks for my FEL, your grapple sure sounds like the right tool :good2:. I usually have two drywall (5 gallon) buckets with about 3 gallons of water in them at the burn site just in case. If you do it right, you're only close to the fire for five seconds or so. Of course there should be ZERO flame impingement on anything! And after any "darting in" to do something, I'll wait 30 seconds for everything to cool down. You have to be there anyway so there is plenty of time. Work with any breeze you have and the embers should not be a problem. And if you do this enough, you might get a ding, scratch, or mark from an ember but hey, it's a tractor.

When it's time to push the pile in with the FEL, I won't push in more than 2-3 feet at a time so that the front tires are never on anything that was just burning. I won't push in more often than every 30 minutes or so. After the first few times you burn, this will all become intuitive.

You didn't ask, but, for starting a pile I like used hydraulic fluid. You can put it on the wood the night before and let it soak in. Cover the area with a tarp. Before you light the pile, put more on. The hydraulic fluid burns slower than diesel, and soaking in the wood makes it last longer. If you don't have hydraulic fluid, diesel is fine too. Never use gasoline. I choose not to use used motor oil because it has too much bad stuff in it. I also burn when there is a light rain and no chance of a big front moving through. Check with local and state people regarding any permits needed and other rules & regs. Don't burn when it's dry or there is a relative humidity less than 30%.

Pete
 
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I think Pete has some good advice and tips for you.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, Good Advice Indeed! - Thank You for the replies

-Dana
 

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I used a trash grapple a whole lot on my 5525.

The issues that I had come up were the bolts working loose on the cylinder retainers. I believe lock tight didn't work very well because it was hot.

o-rings on the lines - leaked a lot sooner than expected.

Other than that - no problem.

Check your cab filters - they will plug up in a hurry when burning.

D.
 

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I've been doing a fair amount of burning the past 4-5 years. Can also verify that flying embers are a cause for concern.. the seat on my 110 has a few small "craters" about the size of a pencil lead, now.

No issue at all with the cylinders or hoses on either the grapple or the curl cylinders, though.

You just can't stop and read a book while you're loading the pile...:biggrin:

AKfish
 

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Motor vehicle Tree Vegetation Transport Leaf

Pete hit all the safety issues right on the head. Your bucket and grapple will get blackened by soot but remember it is a tractor.
I always look at it as I paid good money for it so put it to work.
 

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Yes, Pete did a good job of ID'ing a number safety issues.
 
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