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I know that a lot of people are purchasing the edge tamers and from what I ha e seen so far they seem to work pretty good but the wait time is like 3 weeks or so. In a pinch, is or has anyone using (ed) pvc as a wear edge? I remember seeing somewhere that someone had cut a slit out of a pvc pipe and slid it up on the wear edge of the bucket so the pvc would be making contact with the pavement instead of bucket. Pros and con if you do this? How long can the pvc be expected to last? Pictures if you do use it?


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I've read of many guys doing that-most use ABS however since to seems to hold up better. It does shatter though when it's really cold, and it can/will come off when backdragging.

For the price a piece of pipe it's worth trying, but the Tamers are well worth the price of admission :thumbup1gif:
 

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Tamers before next winter but I’ll prob cut a piece of pipe to get me through feb. we don’t have much snow here and when we do it’s not very much


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I've heard of the pvc pipe on the bottom edge of blowers on stone driveways.
 
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I wonder if the gray electrical pipe would be better than the white PVC??
they are both about the same price,, and the same size,,,,

I have had the white stuff shatter when abused,,,
but, the gray seems to hold up! :good2:
 
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I think plumbing pipe PVC is the same as electrical conduit PVC, except the conduit has gray coloring added to differentiate it from plumbing pipe.

If you're going to use PVC pipe, try and see if you can find SCH80 as the wall is thicker than the usual SCH40. You'll have to go to a plumbing supply store or electrical supplier as the home centers rarely if ever carry SCH80 pipe and conduit.

Another tip I learned from a project totally unrelated to your purpose. If you're going to slit the pipe, put wood spacers at each end to maintain the pipe's diameter as you cut through it. The molding process induces spring tension in the pipe and it will close around a saw blade like a bear trap when there isn't enough plastic to keep the tension at bay.
 

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I think plumbing pipe PVC is the same as electrical conduit PVC, except the conduit has gray coloring added to differentiate it from plumbing pipe.

If you're going to use PVC pipe, try and see if you can find SCH80 as the wall is thicker than the usual SCH40. You'll have to go to a plumbing supply store or electrical supplier as the home centers rarely if ever carry SCH80 pipe and conduit.

Another tip I learned from a project totally unrelated to your purpose. If you're going to slit the pipe, put wood spacers at each end to maintain the pipe's diameter as you cut through it. The molding process induces spring tension in the pipe and it will close around a saw blade like a bear trap when there isn't enough plastic to keep the tension at bay.
I think the gray schedule 80 pipe is also called CPVC. From what I understand it has a higher melting point. For HVAC work it's normally used for exhaust pipe on condensing boilers. Regular PVC will act like a cooked spaghetti noodle. I could believe that the cold would make it more brittle.

I have heard of people also using metal pipes.

This is usually done for plowing stone driveways. In an attempt to not plow the stones along with the snow.
 
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I tried the ABS pipe on my bucket a few years ago. It didn't last one plowing before i saw it in snow pile. It was too much of a pain to worry about down pressure, back dragging, etc. I like to plow for keeps. Fast and efficiently. The fragile piece of pipe was something i didn't need to be worrying about the whole time so i was almost relieved when it came off. lol
 

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I've read of many guys doing that-most use ABS however since to seems to hold up better. It does shatter though when it's really cold, and it can/will come off when backdragging.

For the price a piece of pipe it's worth trying, but the Tamers are well worth the price of admission :thumbup1gif:
ABS is what you want to use. PVC will easily crack.

I've used ABS with some pretty good success although it's a little messy to cut.

I used 1.5" for my FEL bucket. I just made a single pass with my circular saw. I then used a rubber mallet to pound it on the cutting edge. The smaller diameter will keep a pretty tight bite on the bucket edge. BUT... do NOT try to back drag with it or it will pop right off.

I think if you use a bigger diameter pipe, it won't bite as hard on the bucket and will be more prone to popping off.

I used mine on my concrete area outside my garage. It measures approximately 30 x 60. I generally got 2 plowings out of the pipe. I'd flip it over after the first plowing.

I don't remember if Schedule 40 or Schedule 80 is the thicker walled pipe, but buy the thicker walled pipe.

A 10' piece of this was only about $6 or so. I buy 2 or 3 lengths of it, cut them in half and then slit them. That way I only have to make mess one time and I have them ready to put on the bucket as needed.

One thing to keep in mind, the pipe is going to let you get all the way down to the surface of your concrete or asphalt - if that's what you're plowing. The EdgeTamers will not - they will leave a 1" or so layer. If you're clearing snow off gravel - EdgeTamers are the way to go!
 

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I know that a lot of people are purchasing the edge tamers and from what I ha e seen so far they seem to work pretty good but the wait time is like 3 weeks or so. In a pinch, is or has anyone using (ed) pvc as a wear edge? I remember seeing somewhere that someone had cut a slit out of a pvc pipe and slid it up on the wear edge of the bucket so the pvc would be making contact with the pavement instead of bucket. Pros and con if you do this? How long can the pvc be expected to last? Pictures if you do use it?


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Just My thoughts, Whew that's a lot of work?

I'd just go and get a piece of used on new 2 or 3 in cast iron "thick walled" pipe and have the side sliced open then put on bucket and or blower to deal with what sounds like and issue with stone driveways. You can then tap the pipe and bolt it to the bucket as a clamp. BUT HEY THAT JUST ME! I have a stone drive and it is 100 yards, I just tipped the bucket back just a little from flat and it still picks up most of the snow fall, Leaves a little but that pack and eventually gives me a base to run the blower. WORKS FOR ME. I won't do the pipe ordeal, of any kind,

Falls off in the snow and launches it next trip or jacks up the blower, OUCH

Best of luck with your decision?:thumbup1gif:

Regards, waltmart
 

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Schedule 80 is the thicker of the two.
Electrical conduit is the grey stuff and is recommended to build small hoop houses because it wont get brittle in the extreme cold.

For the cheap fix go with the grey.

But if it was me just break down and get the shoes. :bigthumb:
 
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I think the gray schedule 80 pipe is also called CPVC. From what I understand it has a higher melting point. For HVAC work it's normally used for exhaust pipe on condensing boilers. Regular PVC will act like a cooked spaghetti noodle. I could believe that the cold would make it more brittle.

I have heard of people also using metal pipes.

This is usually done for plowing stone driveways. In an attempt to not plow the stones along with the snow.
CPVC is Chlorinated-Poly-Vinyl-Chloride and is rated for hot water use, where regular PVC isn't. CPVC has a yellow tinge to it while regular PVC is white. Schedule 80 pipe used for liquids is dark gray compared to the light gray of PVC electrical conduit. I checked McMaster-Carr and they say that SCH80 PVC pipe is PVC and they also have stuff rated for outdoors with UV resistant additives.

To me, plastic pipe is just a quick stop gap measure until one buys Edge Tamers or makes something from steel pipe.
 

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CPVC is Chlorinated-Poly-Vinyl-Chloride and is rated for hot water use, where regular PVC isn't. CPVC has a yellow tinge to it while regular PVC is white. Schedule 80 pipe used for liquids is dark gray compared to the light gray of PVC electrical conduit. I checked McMaster-Carr and they say that SCH80 PVC pipe is PVC and they also have stuff rated for outdoors with UV resistant additives.

To me, plastic pipe is just a quick stop gap measure until one buys Edge Tamers or makes something from steel pipe.
That is correct, just a short term use. We didn’t get any snow and they have the edge tamers in stock so I’m going to go ahead and order a set.


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