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I'm looking at getting a utility trailer that also has the capacity to carry the 2032r on rare occasions to the dealer etc.

Looking at a single axle with 5500lb capacity or perhaps a dual 3500lb tandem.

What would be the minimum size capacity to ensure no issues with the 2032r? Also usually have the FEL and 2060 box blade on there.

Thanks
 

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I'm looking for a trailer too, but not a utility. SLT trailers, M/T speedhauler 20' (2795.00)
Best deal I can find.
 

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An 18' might give you some wiggle room for positioning with a box blade. I'd definitely go for the tandem 3,500 lb axle for capacity and if you're planning on hauling with implements. Probably give you a little over 5,000 lbs load capacity.

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A 2032R with equipment would be pushing the limits of a 5500 lb trailer. Even if it didn't, I would not feel comfortable with that much weight on a single axle trailer. I would suggest a minimum of 16' tandem. I have a 14' tandem rate for 7000 lbs, which will allow me to haul about 5500 lbs. I just hauled my son's 1025R with bucket and backhoe attached. An 18' would probably be ideal, but a 16' would work. Take a good look at Sure-Trac trailers. They are well built, heavy duty, yet reasonably priced. In my area of Ohio, you can get a 16' Sure-Trac under $2900.

https://sure-trac.com/product/tube-top-utility/
 

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A single axle with anything on it would drive you crazy, trust me ! Dual axles at minimum 3,500 ea.
 

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16' is the absolute minimum. I can put my 4510 on a 16' with loader and backhoe, but its super tight. I owuld go with a 7k or 10k rated model with tandem axles and brakes.
 

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Ok so the 2032r is around 2500lbs just tractor? I'll start searching out a tandem it's really not much more $ if it'll give me peace of mind.
Are we talking Gen-1 or Gen-2?
 

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Ok so the 2032r is around 2500lbs just tractor? I'll start searching out a tandem it's really not much more $ if it'll give me peace of mind.
Are we talking Gen-1 or Gen-2?
Gen2. Running FEL or 366 blade and 2060bb
Yes the tractor alone is just under 2500# (dry), figure another 750# with loader and bucket and whatever your BB weights, and all fluids, easily another 500# and things quickly add up to close to 4K for the loaded machine. Add a BH and a grapple or forks to the load and you’re closing in on 5k.

A trailer capable of that with any margin for safety doesn’t have a single 5k axle.
 

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Refer to post #2, 7000# dual axle,tilt bed,brakes on all 4 wheels,20' long. Safe, extra room to center your load,no ramps to deal with,LED lighting, cheap as I can find.
 

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If you plan on hauling any attachments with the tractor your going to want a 18 or 20’ trailer.

I use a 20’ 10 k car/ equipment trailer to haul my 1026R. Some days I wish I had a 24’ trailer. I have an F250 so I have plenty of truck. I have towed my trailer with my dads F150 and found the 150 tows it well too.
 

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I would go at least 18’ and would think about 20’. I move my Gen 1 2032R with loader/bucket and 60” rotary cutter on a 18’ deck over and the rear wheel of the cutter hangs over by a foot. It works and I like the size of the trailer but it is surprising how long the tractor setup is.
 

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2 schools of thought here.

Bigger is ALWAYS better
And
The shorter the trailer, the easier it is to maneuver

IF you were regularly using this for transport - I’d go with the first. More room is always better if you need it.

Since it sounds like you won’t need this for daily/weekly use, I’d go shorter. Cheaper and as simple as it sounds, 4 foot makes a big difference maneuvering. It will still handle the tractor, won’t leave you much room, but enough.

What not to do - as mentioned, single axle (too lightweight) or going shorter than 16’ - you’ll quickly regret it. Also rushing to buy something or shopping by price alone. Cheaper isn’t always better, but neither is higher priced. A fancy pant job and a “name brand” sticker are tempting - but it’s easy to pay 2x what you need chasing brands. Just like buying any other tool..some people are well served paying for a premium brand - others can get by easily with Harbor Freight quality. Asses your needs and then shop around - used is plentiful, but sometimes it feels sellers want more used than new. Low end expect to pay $1500 for a used 16’ and realize every couple of foot adds 20 percent or more to cost.
 

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Tandem axles are a MINIMUM Requirement. Once you cross the 18' in length threshold, you should stop looking at landscape trailers and move into either car trailers or skid steer trailers. If you look at the landscape trailer brochures for weight ratings, once you get to 16' and tandem axles, every 2' more of trailer length and you lose load carrying capacity. Landscape or Utility trailers are sort of a light weight to mid weight trailer, usually with a minimal wood deck and with twin 3,500 lb axles, they start to drop in actual capacity as the trailer material consumes the GVWR.

When you get into a car trailer or a skid steer type trailer, you are into much heavier duty build and overall, much better quality trailer. You don't want to get a trailer which with your tractor and implement you are at 100% of the trailer capacity. Even if you only use the trailer once in awhile, with the investment you have in your tractor and implements, they should be hauled with the best trailer for the job.

Also, landscape trailers have lift gates and when you run a 4,000 lb tractor and implement up and down the lift gate, it tends to distort the trailer over time. Even though the landscape trailers with tandem axles have maximum loaded weight of 7,000lbs, with many of the lift gates, they are rated to 2,500lbs because the companies who build them plan on the users running zero turn mowers and other such equipment up onto the trailers. Some lift gates are only rated to 1,500 pounds. If a trailer has a lift gate, I wouldn't own it for loading and unloading a tractor which weighs 4,000 lbs. ONLY Use either ramps or a tilt deck trailer for loading a 4,000 pound tractor and implement load.

I owned a trailer and hitch business for several years. I can't tell you how many people I would watch wreck lift gates running heavy items up and down them. It crushes the lift gate itself or distorts it, breaks the hinges between the gate and deck. Get a trailer with ramps or a tilt deck trailer. If you don't want to spend the money for such a trailer and not use it, check your area for renting a skid steer or car trailer for when you need it. They are likely available through equipment companies or rental companies. Some trailer dealers also rent trailers and they know what you need to safely transport your load.

Also, the trailer should have 5,000 lb tie down "D" Ring points, NEVER secure a tractor to a trailers side rails, etc. as they are not load rated for securing any loads, let alone your tractor. Actually, the side rails are more decorative than practical when you are into loads as heavy as your tractor and implements. Side rails are really just in the way and require you to climb over them to properly secure the load.

Chances are your state has very specific laws about requiring trailer brakes on loads as heavy as your tractor. That means a 7 way electrical connector and a brake box in your vehicle. Make sure to check into this as you don't want to be in an accident and found to be violating the law regarding trailer brakes or securing loads, especially if someone is injured or worse.

Sometimes, its worth paying the dealer their pick up and delivery charge because if you don't use a trailer often or don't have the right equipment to Safely haul the tractor, it's cheaper in the long run by far to just pay for pick up and delivery by the outfit which has the equipment and let them deal with complying with the laws.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Tandem axles are a MINIMUM Requirement. Once you cross the 18' in length threshold, you should stop looking at landscape trailers and move into either car trailers or skid steer trailers. If you look at the landscape trailer brochures for weight ratings, once you get to 16' and tandem axles, every 2' more of trailer length and you lose load carrying capacity. Landscape or Utility trailers are sort of a light weight to mid weight trailer, usually with a minimal wood deck and with twin 3,500 lb axles, they start to drop in actual capacity as the trailer material consumes the GVWR.

When you get into a car trailer or a skid steer type trailer, you are into much heavier duty build and overall, much better quality trailer. You don't want to get a trailer which with your tractor and implement you are at 100% of the trailer capacity. Even if you only use the trailer once in awhile, with the investment you have in your tractor and implements, they should be hauled with the best trailer for the job.

Also, landscape trailers have lift gates and when you run a 4,000 lb tractor and implement up and down the lift gate, it tends to distort the trailer over time. Even though the landscape trailers with tandem axles have maximum loaded weight of 7,000lbs, with many of the lift gates, they are rated to 2,500lbs because the companies who build them plan on the users running zero turn mowers and other such equipment up onto the trailers. Some lift gates are only rated to 1,500 pounds. If a trailer has a lift gate, I wouldn't own it for loading and unloading a tractor which weighs 4,000 lbs. ONLY Use either ramps or a tilt deck trailer for loading a 4,000 pound tractor and implement load.

I owned a trailer and hitch business for several years. I can't tell you how many people I would watch wreck lift gates running heavy items up and down them. It crushes the lift gate itself or distorts it, breaks the hinges between the gate and deck. Get a trailer with ramps or a tilt deck trailer. If you don't want to spend the money for such a trailer and not use it, check your area for renting a skid steer or car trailer for when you need it. They are likely available through equipment companies or rental companies. Some trailer dealers also rent trailers and they know what you need to safely transport your load.

Also, the trailer should have 5,000 lb tie down "D" Ring points, NEVER secure a tractor to a trailers side rails, etc. as they are not load rated for securing any loads, let alone your tractor. Actually, the side rails are more decorative than practical when you are into loads as heavy as your tractor and implements. Side rails are really just in the way and require you to climb over them to properly secure the load.

Chances are your state has very specific laws about requiring trailer brakes on loads as heavy as your tractor. That means a 7 way electrical connector and a brake box in your vehicle. Make sure to check into this as you don't want to be in an accident and found to be violating the law regarding trailer brakes or securing loads, especially if someone is injured or worse.

Sometimes, its worth paying the dealer their pick up and delivery charge because if you don't use a trailer often or don't have the right equipment to Safely haul the tractor, it's cheaper in the long run by far to just pay for pick up and delivery by the outfit which has the equipment and let them deal with complying with the laws.
I've seen the dealers trailer they have brought it on and its definitely not near enough. I'm just hoping to gave it to move the tractor or ztr to dealer at times but also serve as a trailer to get plywood, goto dump etc.

Like the idea of a 16 if possible. I'll measure out the tractor with my usual implements.

So a dual 3500 should be ok in a 16 or 18'?

I'll check the ramp capacities too that is a great point.

What about paint? I'm in northern Ontario so wondering if powder coat or galvanized is way to go. Trailer mostly would be on paved roads.

Thanks again.
 

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I'm looking at 2 trailers:

Big tex 70tv in 16' https://www.bigtextrailers.com/70tv-tandem-axle-vanguard

Midsota 16' tandem utility

https://midsotamfg.com/trailers/utility-trailers/

These brands are closest to my area. Any opinions on these two models/brands?

Thanks
I actually looked hard at that same model Big Tex twice. I probably would have went with Big Tex as a second choice after the PJ I got. Tons of Big Tex on the roads around here.

Never really read much in the way of bad reviews. Probably a safe bet.

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