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Discussion Starter #1
This will be a strange question. But, about every day I drive my tractor and manure spreader around my pastures to pick up piles of horse manure. For you non-horse folks, horses produce a lot of manure piles in a day. Picking it up regularly is probably the best way to control gastrointestinal parasites and flies. So, it's drive to a pile-get off the tractor-shovel the pile into the wagon-climb back on the tractor-drive to the next pile-and repeat probably 50 times. Sometimes I just operate the tractor pedals with my hand as I walk beside the tractor from pile to pile; I know it's risky.

manure.jpg

I find myself wishing that there was a way to just have the tractor follow me around like a dog on a leash. So I did a search to see if there were such things as electric vehicles big enough to pull a small trailer around. The only thing I have found so far is a golf club cart.

golf.jpg

My question for you innovative and technologically knowledgable folks is whether you know of a small tractor-like vehicle like this?
 

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With something like that - around here it’s picking up small limbs and sticks after a storm - I find it easier to just walk with a 5 gallon bucket - put the tractor in a central location and let it sit.
 

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Have you considered just running a tine harrow over it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just get one of these.

https://riversedgeequestrian.ca/super-scooper/


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Never seen this. Thanks. I'll need to read about it. One concern in my specific pastures is that they're coastal bermuda with runners everywhere. That makes even using a manure fork a little difficult since the tines catch on the bermuda runners or stolons. That's also one of the two main reasons I don't use a chain harrow and just break up the manure pile; a lot of grass gets ripped up.
 

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The super scooper looks neat, probably the best solution. I see that you have a quick hitch, I'd probably make a system that lets you drop your trailer with the quick hitch, load it and hook back up with out leaving the seat using that. You might need to add a tongue jack and some weight up front to make it stable that way. Maybe even a different trailer all together with a jack in the from and back that keeps the hitch at a height you can attach to, but when leveled out lets the trailer move about.

I have an old snowmobile trailer I use to haul brush around in that manner. I have some weights at the front of the trailer that keep it tongue heavy, and I just pick that up with the trailer ball thing I have for the quick hitch. I leave the tongue jack down and short, I don't even latch the ball. It's picking up brush and yard debris, so it's low speed and low risk. The worst that can happen is it falls off and have to reload it, but I've never had that happen.

Looking at your trailer again, I'd put a block under the tongue to keep it high enough to scoop up with something like this: https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_987783_987783 and add a suitcase weight to the tongue to keep it on the ground. That hitch was just a quick example I found, I don't think you'd need to spend that much. Just make sure to latch it when you dump.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Have you considered just running a tine harrow over it?
I have. This is an ongoing debate among horse people. There are two sides: pickers and draggers.

Pdckers have smaller pastures like me, and not enough total acreage to allow for adequate horse rotation. We are also concerned about the dragged and spread out manure harboring intestinal parasites and being spreado over areas where the horses prefer to graze. Horses tend to have preferred pooping areas and preferred grazing area, but not like cats and their litter boxes.

Draggers have too much land to pick up piles, so use a chain horrow or something to drag over and break up the piles so they dry out more quickly. That helps the fly problem, as flies only lay eggs on wet manure, but the parasite eggs and larvae are still there for a while, so the horses re-ingest them. It's an ongoing cycle.
 

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With something like that - around here it’s picking up small limbs and sticks after a storm - I find it easier to just walk with a 5 gallon bucket - put the tractor in a central location and let it sit.
A single pile of manure from a Clydesdale can overflow a bucket; and the fresher it is the heavier.:laugh:
 

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I think if you did the math,, either you get on your knees and pick up the last of it with tweezers, or you will find the parasites have won the pick up battle.

They just have the advantage that a pick up by fork can not compete with.

When we had horses, I spread the manure with my DIY spreader,,, the manure was dry the same day if it was not raining,,,

IMHO,, the only way to win would be to spray with something the parasites can not survive,,,

Push the math to your advantage,,,:bigthumb:
 

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RetiredDoc,

Would a tow behind lawn sweeper work? I can see that it could get nasty after a while, but if you were to wash it out after every use, it might be manageable.

I have new neighbors who have horses who can step over the chicken fence he uses as a pen, and they leave me presents after they feast on my greener grass. https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/images/smilies/1/flag_of_truce.gif I just walk around with a shovel and fling it off into the woods for fertilization.

Dave
 
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