Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 63 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi.

I recently purchased a LT 133 thinking I could add optional accessories like a tiller attachment and front bucket loader. Boy was I way off...:unknown:

So any way, I figured I should be able to sell this LT 133 for a decent price and put that money towards a nice Garden Tractor. Does any one here have any good suggestions for a JD Garden Tractor with a 3 point hitch option that can handle a decent tiller attachment and run the tiller from the tractor hydro system not electric PTO and not from a tiller w/it's own motor?

I think I'm looking for a slightly used not molested and abused model that's aged gracefully and still looks nice and modern.

I'd also like to be able to put a front bucket Loader on it. Nothing huge just about the size of a Lawn Tractor or slightly larger would do fine.

Thank you,

N2Deer
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
792 Posts
What's your budget? This will determine new vs used. A x7XX or 1 series will be your only options with a loader and will run you about $15,000.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
Right now the 318s are starting to show up for decent prices. Also look for a 322, 330, or a 332 or a 420 or 430. All of these can handle small FELs and a tiller attachment. If you have a few more cash, a 425, 445 or a 455 are nice tractors.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,194 Posts
What do you plan on using the loader for and is that something you plan to get to right away. Digging or just moving mulch?

In reality the only slightly used tractor (not old) that would be recommended for that is the x700 series as mentioned above. You might get by with something smaller for moving loose stuff but its hard to find loader equipped GTs other than the 700 series. Some of the stuff T-Mo mentioned will work but sounds like you want something closer to new?

You will have to add the 3 point kit to about anything you buy.

Problem is you are talking a lot of $$$$.

If a loader is a priority, you might start looking for a machine with a loader now as adding one will probably be expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I highly recommend the X700 series. I recently bought a 2006 X728 with ~200 hours, FEL, power bagger and 48" deck and it ROCKS!:good2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
I just finished a lawn redo with my x749 using a 60" Howard tiller, my 48" landplane, pine needle rake and tow behind spin spreader. I think I would pass on getting a loader on a garden tractor, their just too small for that imo. With the rear 540 pto option you can use the 647 Deere tiller and get good results that would be my first choice. I am using the Howard because I have it and it is virtually brand new with less than 20 hours on it.

At any rate the mower and three point hitch with rear pto works great and I am well pleased with it. No need for a separate engine or hydraulic drive, just get the pto kit add on.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
Since he bought an used LT133 for next to nothing, I'm thinking his budget isn't that high that he can afford a newer X-series machine. And, even used loaders for the older tractors aren't cheap. You can find them, but they're not cheap.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,194 Posts
Since he bought an used LT133 for next to nothing, I'm thinking his budget isn't that high that he can afford a newer X-series machine. And, even used loaders for the older tractors aren't cheap. You can find them, but they're not cheap.
Agreed. Kinda why I was thinking look for a loader with a tractor !

Its all gonna be expensive !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'll have to look into each of the models listed above for HP, Ride Height, Length vs Width and Seat height from ground and then look into what looks to be the best option for width minimums when scooping mulch as mentioned earlier or pushing some dirt around in my freshly tilled garden and so on. I'd like to be able to take the tractor out into the foot hills here when there is a few fallen Oak's and do a few trips back and forth to the trailer loading up fresh cut oak in a tow behind trailer and in the FEL. My budget is not very high at the moment as one was quick to notice by my frugal shopping skills. I'll be buying any thing as cheap as possible running or not as long as it's a good tractor. I will be considering the cost of materials to build my own FEL. As long as I have a PTO switch or lever or a hydro load leveling valve between front and back accessories I think I could get away w less cost. What do you guy's think? Is it cheaper to build your own bucket loader, buy a pre-fab'd kit or buy w/already on the tractor?

Thanks for all the idea's and keep em coming.

I originally set out to build a shed and ended up w/a JD now I'm hooked on JD fever :p

N2Deer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Lets not forget the days of the 8hp 110 or many of the other numerous models that were available with a loader,,, you dont have to spend 15K,,, but you will not get the performance or the features of the super GTs or CUTs,, just depends on your needs/expectations, skills to keep it running and available cash.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
There are other options than FELs, i.e. Johnny Bucket, Superior Scoop, etc. These options may not be as capable as a FEL, but you can use them to scoop up and move material around.

I don't think, in my personal opinion, that the criteria you're setting forth here is a good one. Take for example an older John Deere 140H3. It will be smaller in size than some of the newer tractors, i.e. a John Deere D-series or a Craftsman, but it's a lot more tractor and will do more than those, as it has a bullet proof, cast iron heavy duty Sundstrand hydrostatic transmission and, though only 14 hp, the Kohler K-321 in it will have power and torque than most newer 20 hp engines in it, plus it's cast iron. You need to be taking a look at pure garden tractors. Size of the newer tractors are exaggerated because of all the plastic being used on them - they may appear larger but that size isn't being utilized in weight. A zero turn will weigh more than some older garden tractors, but they won't get the job done when pushing snow or tilling a garden.

I mentioned the 318, it will be a bit heavier than a 140 and will be more comfortable to operate, but a 140 can almost do as much as a 318. I like the 318 because of the power steering (a must when using front end attachments), has better ergonomics, twin cylinder engine, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,626 Posts
Did you say loader ? If so 2210,2305 or even 1026. The 4xx which then became the 5xx and are now x7xx, may all work for you. If you want a 3pt and rear 540 PTO I would get a subcut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
I have some spare change, so I'll throw in $.02

You mentioned specifics about the tiller that you want to run (hydro, not electric, not under its own power, etc). Then you said "loader" with no details.

I'd suggest you step back from everything you've listed out so far and do it all over again. Only, this time, don't indicate specific attachments and options, write out the work that you need to do with a machine regularly (and be detailed).

For example: Cut half an acre of hilly lawn, fill mulch beds yearly with approximately 10 yards of mulch, and till a 40x80 garden plot on level ground.

Those kinds of details will help you (and possibly folks here) to understand what machine with what attachments makes sense and at what sort of price point to expect. If don't buy according to the work it needs to do, you'll almost certainly end up with a machine that is less than optimal in at least one way (underpowered, overpowered, too expensive, etc).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
OK ya'll have given me a lot to think about and got me to realize I can not be so nit picky on age if it's a bullet proof machine. Running or not I am going to be doing all my own maintenance to get it and keep it running. Small engines are easy to work on for the most part w/the exception of electrical shorts that are hard to find.

Another option would be a diesel engine if I could run it on Bio Diesel.

Requirements of the tractor:

Needs to be able to get in and out of narrow openings like gates.

Needs to be able to climb hills.

Needs to be able to pull a good size Trailer around forwards and backwards w/1/2 yard of dirt on it.

Needs to be able to till a plot by about 10x20 on level ground

Needs to be able to scoop dirt from the ground and or dig up a little ground say 6" to a foot deep. I'd also like to use it to to keep my side gate entrance nice and smooth.

Needs to be able to mow at least 1/2 - 1 acre lot. I don't have that kind of land but I know people who do.

Would like it to be able to dig trenches or post holes if I ever get around to redoing the fence and neighbors fences or at least be able to pull the old fence post's out of the ground w/concrete still attached. "This is not a need but would be nice if possible"

Last but not Least it needs to be a JD because nothing runs like a Deere

Thank you and keep the idea's coming,

N2Deer
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,194 Posts
To meet all your requirements you really need a compact utility and not a garden tractor.

In addition your first comment said "I think I'm looking for a slightly used not molested and abused model that's aged gracefully and still looks nice and modern"

If you are looking for something that "looks modern" I think your starting price on is about $10k. Is that what you had in mind? Seems like a big change from your first go around.

Course attachments like tiller and post hole digger, etc are going to be extra.

Course this goes against the fact you want to get in and out of a narrow gate. What is narrow to you?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,490 Posts
To meet all your requirements you really need a compact utility and not a garden tractor
I agree. You mentioned climbing hills. This would warrant a 4WD machine. You probably could do everything with something along the lines of X728,but looking at what those are going for,you could for sure get a nice sub compact for relatively the same cost. Not sure how things are priced out there on the left coast though.

Course this goes against the fact you want to get in and out of a narrow gate. What is narrow to you?
I think I would have to modify the gate,before I let it dictate my tractor size.


From the tasks that you mentioned it would be much better to have a machine more than capable.
When you start pushing a machine to the edge or passed its limitations,inevitably,failures will start to rear their ugly heads.
Hopefully a good deal will come your way.


Greg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
OK ya'll have given me a lot to think about and got me to realize I can not be so nit picky on age if it's a bullet proof machine. Running or not I am going to be doing all my own maintenance to get it and keep it running. Small engines are easy to work on for the most part w/the exception of electrical shorts that are hard to find.

Another option would be a diesel engine if I could run it on Bio Diesel.

Requirements of the tractor:
Being able to do your own work helps you out considerably. I agree that small engine work is among the easiest (comparatively) out there to do. Add in some hydraulics and things get a little more complicated but not bad. If you end up chasing something that's older and non-running because of an excellent deal, make absolutely sure that you'll be able to buy the attachments AND the parts for it that you'll need and want.

Needs to be able to get in and out of narrow openings like gates.
[/QUOTE/

Define "narrow". And, my 2520 machine will fit through any gate that a riding mower with a 54" cutting deck will fit through.

Needs to be able to climb hills.
I would say that you're biggest concern here should be whether or not the machine you're interested in has a hydrostatic transmission or not and what condition it's in. Older ones that are heavily worn / abused have trouble climbing hills when the fluid has warmed up. A rebuild (at the cost of about $350 for parts) or replacement (at $800 and up) would be in order to restore it to proper working condition.

Needs to be able to pull a good size Trailer around forwards and backwards w/1/2 yard of dirt on it.
I had a "smallish" riding mower that could pull a cart with just about a half yard of materials in it easily. I don't see an issue here except as it could relate to the transmission issue listed above.

Needs to be able to till a plot by about 10x20 on level ground
Have you considered just getting a separate tiller for this? It's a small enough area that you could do it with a purpose-built machine and very likely keep your costs down significantly over an attachment (and getting a machine to run it). Unless you're tilling a garden plot for 30 people every year, a dedicate machine might serve you better.

Needs to be able to scoop dirt from the ground and or dig up a little ground say 6" to a foot deep. I'd also like to use it to to keep my side gate entrance nice and smooth.
I think the key here is *how MUCH* dirt? Folks use things like the Johnny Bucket with great success to scoop and lift materials in smaller amounts. As long as they aren't trying to ultimately move 50 yards of material in a weekend, they're fine. You have to evaluate the total amount of material to be moved to understand how many trips it will take with a particular capacity bucket. Then you factor in how far you're moving it to determine how much seat time you'll need to put in moving it around.

Needs to be able to mow at least 1/2 - 1 acre lot. I don't have that kind of land but I know people who do.
A lot that size is VERY common, and any size machine will do it. You have to consider what the actual terrain is like, too, though. If its very hilly and the hills are somewhat steep (you'd be surprised at how small of an angle something would be called "steep" at, too), then you don't want to be mowing on a tall machine with a high center of gravity.

Would like it to be able to dig trenches or post holes if I ever get around to redoing the fence and neighbors fences or at least be able to pull the old fence post's out of the ground w/concrete still attached. "This is not a need but would be nice if possible"
Go back and look at this one again. Use my previous comments to understand whether this is a *common* task for the machine or not. If you need to do it with regularity, you just landed squarely in the CUT category of machines. Get out your wallet as these machines will set you back $20,000 or more for a new one without batting an eyelash.

Last but not Least it needs to be a JD because nothing runs like a Deere
I like your attitude, but the truth is that it doesn't need to be. Depending on the model of machine you buy and its age, you could well be buying something made by a different company and simply branded with the Green paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
I agree. You mentioned climbing hills. This would warrant a 4WD machine. You probably could do everything with something along the lines of X728,but looking at what those are going for,you could for sure get a nice sub compact for relatively the same cost. Not sure how things are priced out there on the left coast though.



I think I would have to modify the gate,before I let it dictate my tractor size.


From the tasks that you mentioned it would be much better to have a machine more than capable.
When you start pushing a machine to the edge or passed its limitations,inevitably,failures will start to rear their ugly heads.
Hopefully a good deal will come your way.


Greg
The OP added a lot of detail with the most recent requirements, but I don't believe any of us know yet whether SCUT or CUT is appropriate or if 4WD is really a necessity or not. "Hills" in Wyoming are NOT the same as "Hills" in Florida. :)

Owning a CUT, I'll never go back to something like a riding mower or garden tractor until / unless there is a very specific need to. I see how much value it brings for me to own my machine and do the things with it that I do. But, it's not yet clear (to me, at least) what sort of machine is really necessary here.

When I bought my machine, I listed out all of the regular work that it would do. I realized that it's biggest task was moving pallets of firewood (because of the weight). I did some research to see how much wood weighed based on volume and then found a few machines that would do what I needed. I compared them, made sure I could meet my minimum requirements, and then bought at the price that made the most sense. It wasn't until I had determined all of the actual specifications of the work I would be doing, though, that I could actually tell whether a particular machine could do what I needed or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
I will challenge the popular vote here and say for what you need to do there is absolutely no reason you need to spend the money for CUT or an X series tractor.Minus the 4wd the 445,455 or the older 420,430 will do every bit of what the X series will do.
The X series are some of the most comfortable ergonomically friendly machines built.A true Cadillac in the garden tractor world.
However if money is the issue then the other models I listed will get you buy any day of the week.
The 445,455 has the ability to add a category 1 hitch and a 540 rpm pto on the rear.Loaded rear wheels and traction control will get you just about in and out of anywhere 4wd will.More than capable of climbing hills.
Deere offered quick attach loaders for these and there are cheaper aftermarket loaders available as well.
If all you need is to scoop and mover dirt/mulch there are different scoops available rather than dish out the funds for a loader.
The 420,430 is an exact copy and paste of what I just typed for the 445,455 except the rear pto is 2000 rpm and tillers are a little harder to find for those.Hydro is hand operated rather than foot operated like the 445,455 and takes a little getting used to.
If all of this stills seems a little over the top then the 300 series of of the 80's and early 90's have the same stuff available as the 420,430 but smaller less hp.The 318 is one of the most popular but there was a diesel option of the 318 called the 332 and a liquid cooled option of the 318 called a 322.Other models as well without power steering and only single spool hydraulics were 316 and the diesel 330.
If you want to run a loader or a scoop I do not recommend those since they only have single spool hydraulics it can become difficult to power up a loader.
Yes my post is wordy but you need to do your homework and be informed when making a purchase.
Spending 10k on a new machine when a 2k machine will have the same functions,you need to know your options.
As a note-I am not knocking the X series guys.If money were not an option I would own one in a heartbeat.But to say because it is a "super garden tractor" it is really what you need is not an accurate statement.
I will ad some pictures of my past and present machines with some of the options you speak of.

AJ
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
AJ,
You said what I said, but with more finesse and information. One thing also to consider, next to money, is storage and trailer-ability. Truth is, the garden tractors, being smaller, are easier to store and easier to trailer. You can used a small compact truck, i.e. Ranger, and smaller trailers. But....the green fever is very contagious and very dangerous. Only venture into the green world with caution. You buy one tractor and some implements. Next you find it's easier to buy more tractors, one for each implement, instead of changing out implements all the time. I say this with a bit of tongue in cheek, but it also very true. Most guys end up buying a tractor for each implement they have. Being smaller and not taking up as much room as a SCUT or CUT, as well as being cheaper, you can afford to buy more toys, er, I mean, implements.
 
1 - 20 of 63 Posts
Top