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RIP Ben
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Discussion Starter #1
I need some advice about installing a water supply line on my property. Just got the meter installed at the street and measured to where I need the hydrants. It will be 150' and slightly uphill at about a 10' rise over the 150'. There is a 3/4 female fitting on the ball valve at the meter and I plan on putting in a freeze proof hydrant at the end next to my parking space for my camper.
Just need some recommendations for pipe material, size, depth, and any other tips from those of you who have done something similar.
By the way, the trench will not be straight as I will have to dig around some trees. Will be using the 9" trenching bucket on my backhoe.

Thanks for any advice!
 

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Are you planning to use the water line later for a house or dwelling that will be subject to local code requirements? I know you asked about a single yard hydrant and a camper. Are all the usual options allowed in your town (copper, PVC, CPVC, and PEX)?

Remember that a hydrant back siphons. That's how its kept from freezing. You may need a back-siphon valve or vacuum breaker in your installation to minimize risk of water supply contamination.
 

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Depth would be below frost line, consider bedding the line in sand. Here in Wyoming we also "sandwich" the PEX line between two layers of 2 inch foam board. So we are at 6 feet in depth with sand on the base as bedding and foam board.


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RIP Ben
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Discussion Starter #4
Frostline

Here in northwest Georgia 18" is the recommended depth to avoid freezing. But the meter is at ground level. Wonder how that works.
 

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If it were me I'd use SCH 40 PVC as it's much easier to work with (especially by yourself) than black poly pipe or anything that's coiled with the exception of soft copper. Of course you could go SCH 80; but that just runs up the bill significantly. If you have a way to get it home I'd also consider getting 20' sticks instead of the 10' sticks sold at the big box stores to have fewer joints.

I also like to put a 4" - 6" bed of pea gravel (3/8") or squeegee (1/4") in the trench followed by another 4" - 6" of the same material as cover before putting the topsoil back in place. The gravel allows the pipe to squirm without breaking when the earth shifts a bit from natural processes.

If you go all plastic you might consider zip tying a copper wire to the pipe that can be used in the future to locate the line if you forget exactly where the trench was dug. Plastic natural gas line has a wire in it for that purpose.
 

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I guess I have some questions and this install is going to be based on local regs. Check with you local water authority before you start.
In our area, the water meter is inside the house or first structure it feeds.
So, is your water meter at the street?
Our local code requires water feed line to be no less than 3/4" K copper laid in stone dust (what we call cracker dust), buried to below the frost line which is 36" in our part of the country.
Our area also requires a check valve installed in this line where it enters the building. Because of the check valve, there needs to be an expansion tank installed on your water system on the house side of the check valve.
In our area you would also need a pressure regulator to reduce supply pressure since the supply pressure is normally about 80 to 100 psi.
An subsequent feeds most be T'd off after the water meter.

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With a 4 ft depth requirement here and the ground bony as heck I like to sleeve the water line with a bigger pipe. Just need to be reasonably straight.
 

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I need some advice about installing a water supply line on my property. Just got the meter installed at the street and measured to where I need the hydrants. It will be 150' and slightly uphill at about a 10' rise over the 150'. There is a 3/4 female fitting on the ball valve at the meter and I plan on putting in a freeze proof hydrant at the end next to my parking space for my camper.
Just need some recommendations for pipe material, size, depth, and any other tips from those of you who have done something similar.
By the way, the trench will not be straight as I will have to dig around some trees. Will be using the 9" trenching bucket on my backhoe.

Thanks for any advice!
We replaced a 2" line from the regulator at the old well to our home two summers ago. We used a roll of poly pipe, trenched to about four feet deep, and removed as many of the sharp rocks as we could to prevent wearing a hole through the new pipe. We had 3/4" NPT fittings at either end of the pipe to contend with.

I concur with a check valve , and you may want to consider a low point drain near your meter to gravity drain your line prior to winter freeze.

Brian
 

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Chief Stick-picker-upper
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What part of Georgia? (will make a difference)

I'm in south Louisiana.
Meter is 8" below ground surface.
Supply line from meter to house is 1" copper, buried 8" - 10" deep.(common soil)
Remaining water supply line on property is 1" SCH 40 PVC(with copper wiring zip-tied around it for future locating).
Remaining water supply lines are buried 6" - 8" deep throughout property.(does not get below 32°f for any length of time here)

Note: 3/4" was suggested by a plumber, but I used 1". The larger diameter makes for good volume.
 

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RIP Ben
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Discussion Starter #11
I appreciate all the replies so far. I need to think this through with all the provided information considered.
My soil is mostly shale so I think I will definitely need to introduce something in the trench to protect the pipe, whatever I use. I was leaning towards black poly since the trench will have several bends to avoid trees. Schedule 40 pvc in 20' lengths seems to be the most economical solution though.
My property is very close to the TN state line south of Cleveland, TN.

The water line will only be used to supply a camper with a freeze proof hydrant. I will install a back flow preventer, and maybe a regulator. I do have a hose type regulator to protect the camper. I believe it is fixed at 60psi.
 

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When we ran our line to the hydrant by our garage we used black poly pipe in stone dust. Like you we live in shale ground with some mountain stone thrown in for good measure. The black poly tubing also supplies the house from the well as well as the geothermal unit from its wells. Our well driller told me the pipe will out last me. And that’s good enough for me.


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Any thoughts about putting your hydrant close to the meter and just running a garden hose to the camper when needed? If you only use the camper occasionally and have no house plans in the future for the site, you could lock the hydrant, roll up your hose and go home. Spend the trenching and pipe laying time and money for something you really want to buy and/or do.
 

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Here in northwest Georgia 18" is the recommended depth to avoid freezing. But the meter is at ground level. Wonder how that works.
We live in Virginia,, and since 1982,
have never had the 2 exposed outdoor valves get damaged from freezing.

The valves are not freeze-proof,, they are the $4 variety. :dunno:
 

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RIP Ben
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Discussion Starter #15
Any thoughts about putting your hydrant close to the meter and just running a garden hose to the camper when needed? If you only use the camper occasionally and have no house plans in the future for the site, you could lock the hydrant, roll up your hose and go home. Spend the trenching and pipe laying time and money for something you really want to buy and/or do.
That would be about 175' of hose to roll up and store. In addition, I want to have the hydrant available to use when burning brush.
 

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This hose reel is 108 dollars with free shipping from Amazon. It holds 300 feet of hose, has decent pneumatic tires, and is easy to move, and to unroll and re-roll hoses. Plus, it is a handy way to store all my hoses during the winter. You can unroll all 300 feet, or just what you need for a specific job. And best of all, no more carrying hoses, and no more kinking and knots.

I did have a pasture hydrant installed recently. It was a 350 foot run from my well. Used 1-1/2 inch PVC buried about 20 inches deep (code here is 10 inches deep). Cost, including pipe, couplers, hydrant, and labor was $400. It was done in less than half a day. If I had a backhoe maybe I'd have done it myself, but just picking up all the supplies would have eaten up half a day or more for me. And I don't know that I'd have been able to do it any cheaper.
 

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Doc
This cart certainly looks to be built well?


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Think in any water supply I bury in the future, I'm going to run 14 ga wire in the trench. That way I can locate the pipe if I ever need to.
 

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Think in any water supply I bury in the future, I'm going to run 14 ga wire in the trench. That way I can locate the pipe if I ever need to.
If you use K copper, you can locate also, just saying!!! :good2:
 
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