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Discussion Starter #1
So I bought this place last year, and here's the current state of the "barn":

uploadfromtaptalk1428539844340.jpg

uploadfromtaptalk1428539869489.jpg

You can see there's already a little fenced in paddock on the left, so I could add a barn door on that side no problem. No animals yet, but wanting maybe a mini horse or couple mini donkeys and or some goats.

The issue is with the right side. Right now there's bare dirt, and after 5ft away from barn side, it goes up an incline. You can see it gets very wet there, obviously.

Even if there's grass growing all the way up to barn, over time animals going in and out would kill the grass and muck it up.

What the heck do I do?!
 

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So I bought this place last year, and here's the current state of the "barn":

View attachment 43452

View attachment 43453

You can see there's already a little fenced in paddock on the left, so I could add a barn door on that side no problem. No animals yet, but wanting maybe a mini horse or couple mini donkeys and or some goats.

The issue is with the right side. Right now there's bare dirt, and after 5ft away from barn side, it goes up an incline. You can see it gets very wet there, obviously.

Even if there's grass growing all the way up to barn, over time animals going in and out would kill the grass and muck it up.

What the heck do I do?!
It doesn't look too bad. What ever you do, it looks like it would be minor. It looks like it drains toward the driveway. Is that accurate? You could slope it a little better and smooth it out to help it out. Would a culvert get it going under the driveway and draining to the left?
 

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I am watching this with interest, as we have a very similar problem. Except where your barn is, we have an outdoor, sanded riding arena. The snowmelt fills our corresponding low area and spills into the arena. Our low area is part of our "winter paddock", getting lots of horse action (5 horses), and even though the snow has melted, there is still standing water there.

Of course our outdoor arena was put in in late summer when all was good and dry.

So like you, I'm wondering what's best... Grading, drainage, weeping tiles, etc??

== Grizzler
 

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I would agree with Arlen. It looks like you have a ditch to the left of the driveway. A culvert under the driveway and maybe a little grading to get all the water headed towards it.

You could also tile it...

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Discussion Starter #5
You are correct that under the drive to the barn is a metal culvert. Before yesterday it just had grass, but you can see I dug a trench on the one side that goes towards a creek, I plan on putting corrugated pipe in it, so water going under the drive will not make a creek through the grass.

Everything to the right in the picture has an uphill grade. So water comes from the yard strait right, along side of where pasture will be, but then also the currently dirt valley next to barn.

So you guys are thinking that if I had some good grass growing there, its already draining enough I wouldn't have to worry about it?

I feel like if I eventually had larger animals going in and out over there, it would become a mud pit still though.

I feel I can't really do any grading, because the entire barn is below the entire pasture height level... there's going to be a valley or flat spot next to barn no matter what, right?
 

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You are correct that under the drive to the barn is a metal culvert. Before yesterday it just had grass, but you can see I dug a trench on the one side that goes towards a creek, I plan on putting corrugated pipe in it, so water going under the drive will not make a creek through the grass.

Everything to the right in the picture has an uphill grade. So water comes from the yard strait right, along side of where pasture will be, but then also the currently dirt valley next to barn.

So you guys are thinking that if I had some good grass growing there, its already draining enough I wouldn't have to worry about it?

I feel like if I eventually had larger animals going in and out over there, it would become a mud pit still though.

I feel I can't really do any grading, because the entire barn is below the entire pasture height level... there's going to be a valley or flat spot next to barn no matter what, right?
I think you would want to keep bigger animals off of that spot when wet, because they put lots of little pockets in the ground that holds water, then they muck it all up.

If it was smoothed out, grass growing and draining away from the barn, I wouldn't worry about it too much.
 

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I feel I can't really do any grading, because the entire barn is below the entire pasture height level... there's going to be a valley or flat spot next to barn no matter what, right?
Yes and no. Yes, you'd end up with flat areas and a valley near the barn but I think if it were me I'd try to grade things out so that the water was concentrated into a smaller area. Right now, you've got standing water covering a 20' wide dirt patch.

If you sloped away from the barn for 8' or so and then back up with a continuous slope to the top of the little knoll you'd have a valley at the bottom that all of the water would run to. Once seeded, your "mud spot" would only be a 2' wide strip at the very bottom of the valley. Then if you wanted to get really happy you could trench up that valley, put in drain pipe and drain it all into your culvert.

But the whole idea would be to grade the area to get all that standing water to move somewhere else.

All of that said, if you're going to run animals in that area, just give up on the idea of grass. If you look at pics of almost any animal barn you'll see that there is very little grass left anywhere that the animals are allowed to run. Whatever they don't eat, they'll stomp to death. :laugh:
 

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How would I tile it with it also being part of a future pasture, and right by barn?
Jim stayed exactly what I was thinking with the grading. With tiling, you bury perforated pipe in the ground and that will carry away excess moisture. You can still plant grass over top of it. The best solution would be a combination of both.

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I would put rain gutters on the shed and connect the down spout to some type of tile and run a couple lines of tile to take care of the water coming from the hill.

Doug
 

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I'd grade it better, put gutters on the shed, and do a weeping tile to get rid of the water from the whole thing.

If you dug a trench, put tile in the bottom of it, then graded to that trench as a low for water to collect in, I think you'd dry the whole area out. Guttering the shed roof shortens the path of that water (which can be substantial) from passing over the grade at all, and going right into the tile.

I bet you could do it with a trencher and a box blade in a day.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
How deep do I need to go with the perforated tile? I need to put rocks and fabric around it?

Look at this, here is the other side of the culvert, I should do same thing here?

uploadfromtaptalk1428579002788.jpg

I need to go a lot deeper before laying the tile, and need to cover it with rocks?
 

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There are millions of acres of farmland drained with corrugated/perforated tile without rock surrounding it.
If you want to be cautious, you can get the cloth wrap for it, but for this purpose, I think rock is overkill.

If you'll only be driving over it with your scut or cut, I think 8" covering the top of the pipe will be fine. Less would probably work.

I know this conflicts with what others are saying.
 

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There are millions of acres of farmland drained with corrugated/perforated tile without rock surrounding it.
If you want to be cautious, you can get the cloth wrap for it, but for this purpose, I think rock is overkill.

If you'll only be driving over it with your scut or cut, I think 8" covering the top of the pipe will be fine. Less would probably work.

I know this conflicts with what others are saying.
You are absolutely correct.
I was merely commenting on the picture and shallow muddy ditch he has cut.
But stoneless farm field drain is not laid 2 inches below the surface.
It's deep enough not to be affected by tractors and or discing and plowing.
It's always best to go as deep as possible with any pipe to protect it.

But i will stress that if not stoned, a fabric wrap should be used or you will fill that small pipe with sediment carried in by the water if you are draining a wet area. Might not happen overnight but it will eventually.
I have dug up many clogged solid field drains, old clay tile field drain laid on top of cedar boards, and others that were unprotected.

This isn't me trying to be a know it all by any means.
Just giving some real life on the job past experience.
Take it as you wish.
People ask opinions and it's great to see when folks are trying to help out and save some undo stress in their projects.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
OK, I'll try burying this stuff as deep as possible wherever I use it. I have another spot that goes from the pool area to the woods I need to do as well.

Concerning putting perforated pipe in the valley next to the barn, I feel like it's a different scenario, because I don't just want it to take water gushing from a culvert, but to actually very quickly absorb water later in the valley above it.

Even if the pipe is 2ft under ground, will the water in the valley drain down into it fast enough??
 

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I agree with Jim and Doug. Grade it then bury a perf field tile that runs to the creek. You can buy field tile that is already sleeved on the outside with fabric. Perhaps this will eliminate the hassle of additional fabric. The main thing to be aware of is slope. I buried perf tile to drain wet areas like you have. I needed the exercise and had the time so I used a cheap laser on a tripod and an idiot stick for measuring and tried for a quarter inch per running foot of slope. A little more slope would be better but you have to deal with the natural slope of your land. You need constant slope to the creek so you are not just draining one wet spot and making another further down the land. The tile can run right through the existing culvert but watch the slope. Our farmers bury field tile and then have a grassed waterway above it through their fields. Another question would be how rocky your soil is. It make slow down the digging if you have a lot of stone. Burying at the frost line or slightly above it will slow down the rock movement by winter freeze. You don't want those field stones to push up your tile as they move toward the surface. Everything depends on slope. I'd also go a bit upstream from the wet area with the tile. Chances are that your water is not just coming from the roof. You can do it yourself or hire a tiling company to do it with their equipment. Either way it is a lot of work but if I could do it at 68 by hand, I'm sure you can do it. Good luck.
 

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How deep you put your tile will depend on where your outlet ends up. You need fall in your tile for the water to run. I would shoot for at least a foot down.

I'm trying to understand the second part.... The tile should be feeding the culvert, not vise versa. Now, how fast the area dries up after a rain will depend on the size of tile you lay down. An 8" tile is going to move A LOT of water. 6" would even be oversized for your situation. I would run a 4" perforated pipe thru the problem area, then a solid pipe to your outlet/culvert.
 

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I have absolutely no idea how you made all those lines on the pics but, yes. :laugh: That's pretty much exactly what I'd be trying to do.
 

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I guess I look at this a different way. I try to avoid any underground field drainage pipe whenever possible - as blue says above, unless properly installed with fabric and/or stone it will fill up with sediment.

What I would do is create a sloping swale from the wet area near the barn to the inlet of the culvert pipe. Then on the outlet side just make a nice ditch (just touch up what you have there already). You would be able to mow the swale on the upper end and just mow up to the ditch on both sides on the lower side. No future problems with underground pipes clogging.
 
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