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On March 25th 2013, we had the opportunity to use a Proof Testing Sled capable of pulling up to 44,000 pounds and recording test data via specialized software. This machine is owned and operated by B/A Products in Columbia, Maryland. A special thanks to Fritz for his assistance and technical expertise in completing these tests.

Five different tests where performed, documented, photographed, and videoed. I did my best to simulate real life use of the hooks and document the results for all to see. I think the results show not only the quality of the materials used, but the strength of the design and construction as well.

Below are the five videos, for more detailed descriptions and still pictures of each test please visit the Proof Testing page at Ken's Bolt on Grab Hooks Proof Testing

Test #1: Testing a Clevis Mount (BOCM) mounted to a 1/2" thick plate.



Test #2: Testing a Bolt-On Grab Hook (BOGH) mounted to a 1/2" thick plate.

Test #3: Testing a Bolt-On Grab Hook (BOGH) mounted to a 10 gauge thick plate to simulate the average thickness of a bucket.
NO Backing plate was used in this test, there is no evidence of the bolts pulling out, but the holes where elongated slightly.
 

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4th and 5th Test

Test#4: Testing a Bolt-On Grab Hook (BOGH) mounted to a 10 gauge thick plate to simulate the average thickness of a bucket.
There was a Backing Plate used in this test, it was bent over.


Test#5: Testing a Bolt-On Grab Hook (BOGH) mounted to a 10 gauge thick plate to simulate the average thickness of a bucket.
NO Backing plate was used in this test.
The chain was only pulled from one side this time, much like the way they are normally used.

 

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That is a very good testament to your product. Thanks for caring enough to test them and post this.

Suggestion: paint the test hook green and maybe it won't even bend! :laugh:
 

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Very nice Kenny. I will be ordering soon, just need to figure out how many I want.

I'm thinking a putting a hook or clevis mount on the back of my backhoe bucket, do you recommend a backing plate? Now I'm sure your hardware won't break, just don't want to bend the bucket.
 

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These are the results of quality parts and workmanship!!:good2:
Kudos to you and your products Ken!
 

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I helped neighbor pull some old 4x4x8 fence post yesterday using those bad boy Ken's hooks on my 1026R/H120 FEL:thumbup1gif:
 

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Very nice Kenny. I will be ordering soon, just need to figure out how many I want.

I'm thinking a putting a hook or clevis mount on the back of my backhoe bucket, do you recommend a backing plate? Now I'm sure your hardware won't break, just don't want to bend the bucket.
As the video's show, the backing plate will not stop "bending the bucket", only common sense will help with that and it's NOT included:laugh:

But, because of the various angles that you could pull from with the backhoe, I would probably recommend a backing plate.
 

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As the video's show, the backing plate will not stop "bending the bucket", only common sense will help with that and it's NOT included:laugh:

But, because of the various angles that you could pull from with the backhoe, I would probably recommend a backing plate.
I just wonder... The bucket is way more expensive to replace than the hooks. Shouldn't the hooks be the weak part of the link? Which means, are the hooks over designed for this application. Would it make sense to have weaker hooks to not damage the bucket if loads are exceeded?
 

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I just wonder... The bucket is way more expensive to replace than the hooks. Shouldn't the hooks be the weak part of the link? Which means, are the hooks over designed for this application. Would it make sense to have weaker hooks to not damage the bucket if loads are exceeded?
I believe the hydraulic pressure relief valve should protect the tractor. :good2:


Cool videos Ken! It would take a large effort from a very powerful tractor to break your hooks. :thumbup1gif:
 

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I just wonder... The bucket is way more expensive to replace than the hooks. Shouldn't the hooks be the weak part of the link? Which means, are the hooks over designed for this application. Would it make sense to have weaker hooks to not damage the bucket if loads are exceeded?
Short answer: No.

Long answer: As Jason mentioned, the PRV in the main hydrauilc system as well as the one in the hydro-stat should protect the bucket, loader, hooks, chains and everything else from being damaged. Just like when you try to lift something to heavy with your loader, the PRV will open and not allow the lift. It's the "fuse" or "circuit breaker" in the system to prevent things from getting overloaded and/or damaged.

If the hook was the "fuse", and it broke while lifting or pulling the results could be deadly-can you imaging a chain flying straight back and hitting you if the hook broke, or a piece of the broken hook hitting you? While that may never happen, just the thought that it could is scary to me. How about your suspended MMM falling while lifting it to service the blades?

Engineering something to break at a specific point would be a true feat for me, especially when that "point" would be different for every series/model of machine. It would undoubtedly raise the price considerably as well.

My promise: I will continue to make the strongest product(s) I can, with the best available materials I can at the best value for as long as I am in business. If I cant do those three things, I will close it all down.

As I wrote on my FAQ page:
Common sense must prevail also so as not to damage your equipment.
 

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Short answer: No.

Long answer: As Jason mentioned, the PRV in the main hydrauilc system as well as the one in the hydro-stat should protect the bucket, loader, hooks, chains and everything else from being damaged. Just like when you try to lift something to heavy with your loader, the PRV will open and not allow the lift. It's the "fuse" or "circuit breaker" in the system to prevent things from getting overloaded and/or damaged.

If the hook was the "fuse", and it broke while lifting or pulling the results could be deadly-can you imaging a chain flying straight back and hitting you if the hook broke, or a piece of the broken hook hitting you? While that may never happen, just the thought that it could is scary to me. How about your suspended MMM falling while lifting it to service the blades?

Engineering something to break at a specific point would be a true feat for me, especially when that "point" would be different for every series/model of machine. It would undoubtedly raise the price considerably as well.

My promise: I will continue to make the strongest product(s) I can, with the best available materials I can at the best value for as long as I am in business. If I cant do those three things, I will close it all down.

As I wrote on my FAQ page:
You convinced me, and I will keep your hooks on my bucket. But I might, at some later day, put a reinforcement plate under the entire top of the bucket, from hook to hook.
 

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Excellent craftsmanship Kenny!! Now I see why everyone raves about your hooks.........great job!! Just one question...........are the green ones are stronger than the orange ones?:laugh:
 

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Excellent craftsmanship Kenny!! Now I see why everyone raves about your hooks.........great job!! Just one question...........are the green ones are stronger than the orange ones?:laugh:
The John Deere yellow ones are the strong, high speed, low drag hooks.

Don :usa
 
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