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Discussion Starter #1
I have decided to post the progress of my pump shed. Due to the small size of this shed (4x8ft), I wasn't going to post it, but I thought I might as well. Perhaps it will help someone who is thinking of doing the same thing, and due to the audience on here, I will likely get some good information too, as I did in my last building post (link below). The intent of the building will be a semi-permanent small insulated building which will have power to run a well pump, house a pressure tank, with faucets on the outside. What I mean by semi-permanent is about 5-10 years, when I actually begin building the house, where this pump shed will then be converted into something else.

Hopefully enjoy, and pictures will be coming soon!


10x12 Lawn Shed Build
Backyard Lawn Shed Project
 

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He-He, As you said, you'll probably get some information...maybe good, maybe not so good!

Here's a start! You said " where this pump shed will then be converted into something else." Converted means torn down, moved, serve another purpose (like storage) ?

My thoughts are 4x8 is almost large for a pump house (but you know the foot print of the equipment), especially if it's gonna be torn down. If moved or re-purposed, it's kinda small. Evaluate your storage needs, for both now and future, and consider replicating your 10x12 shed....especially since this came out GREAT!

Consideration for pump house: HEAT! Ohio gets cold winters and you may want to add a heat source of some type. A thermostat could turn on several 120 watt flood lights...although you may need a relay. These would keep the inside warm, especially with the insulation, and shouldn't "break the bank." If you went 10x12, a temporary insulated wall (attach to side walls with lag screws) would reduce the area your heating.

Just my first thoughts...but I'll prolly be back! Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ah, Bob, well Hello!

When I say converted, I mean re-purposed into something else. Perhaps a small chicken coop or something. For right now, I wanted small, inexpensive, and easy to put up. I would like have this wrapped up by Labor day, which isn't likely going to happen, but we'll see.

4x8 is large for a pump shed. Most people have something similar in quarter of the size. However, I wanted to have room to move and standup in, hang equipment/hoses, and other stuff, and be able to put in a vent or heater if I wanted too. I also wanted something that would look decent. The plans are very similar to the 10x12, on smaller. I am still pleased with the 10x12, so I imagine I will be with this one as well. I wanted small, so it would be easier to heat if I needed. I don't know if I will actually use it during the winter, at least for now, but I wanted to design it so I could.

I will let you know as I go!

Thoughts/ideas from the ideation station:
This thing needs to be Ohio winter-proof when not in use when power off (quick walkthrough to prepare it for winter (drain, turn power off, lock the door)
It needs to be Ohio Winter ready for when I do use it though the winter (heat, freeze-proof, etc) - likely not this year in application, but ready
I foresee two types of heaters. First, good old 100W light bulbs as the first heater (like at 40 degrees the lights turn on) and an actual heater to heat pipes (at 36 it kicks on). I will figure this out later.
I intend on putting some LED lights on the outside that would indicate the statuses. Single light for power, double for heat 1, triple for heat 2, and so on. I am considering utility lights with painted covers. Basically, I don't want to walk to the shed to see if it's functioning.
The shed needs to be able to have multiple external water spigots.
I am also considering a drain plug or something to be able to drain from the inside to the outside.
Sounds like a lot, but just trying to get it figured out, so I can begin to implement.
I might actually build a further insulated space inside the 4x8 and make it a little heat box, just to make sure it doesn't freeze. It's northern Ohio, so it needs to withstand subzero temps.
 

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my first thought would be .....how to pull the pump?

if it were me ... #1i would make the shed small and light enough to be able to pickup and move with a machine that i own

2nd would be to highly insulate the whole unit

3rd would be some sort of emergency heat if you actually have wet items above frost line (not needed where i am due to the fact we keep all the wet items below frost line)

4th would be makeing the shed multi-purpose

that would be my priority list....if you lose your pump and need to pull it having a shed to hang your shovels becomes very low priority
 

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Sounds like the situation is under control!

As far "an actual heater to heat pipes (at 36 it kicks on)" there a heat tape that you wrap around your pipes...built in thermostat, plugs into 120, add insulation around tape & pipe, and your good!

Your "further insulated space" is what I was getting at with a temporary wall. You could make 2 swinging doors and a hinged top that lifts up against the back wall...open top to inspect, open doors to do "stuff".

I'm just throwing stuff out there, but I'm confident you'll figure it out as far as what's best and what's best for YOU! Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The build has begun. First off, the foundation needs to be set. Because a water and power line conduit will be running through the floor of the building, I decided to install a conduit tile before the build. I got 11 feet of smooth bore tile and dug a trench 4 and half feet deep below the frost line. When my water guy comes and installs the well pump he won't need to mess with the building - just snake the lines through the existing tile. Attached is an image of my wife assisting in the dig. She's never dug a hole bigger than to simply plant a flower. This was a great opportunity for her to practice with the tractor and get her hands on a shovel.

Once the tile was laid, I covered it with dirt. Before I covered the entire foundation area with stone I set 4 cinder blocks at each corner for piers.

Tonight, I plan on heading back out and begin building the foundation, setting the earth anchors, and cutting the tile hole.

Meanwhile, I have been painting the T1-11 siding. As most folks know from my previous thread, I LOVE [sarcasm] painting! Especially, T1-11! Only six total though, so it shouldn't be bad.
 

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Hi, I'd like to a few ideas out there for you. The first is much like the tape that goes around the pipe but this is for heating already installed water line, and goes inside the water line to heat the liquid inside the water line. It comes out of a special water tight fitting and plugs into your 120v receptacle via a GFCI in the plug. When I bought it, it was called Retro-Line made by Heat-Line. It's always plugged in and is only supposed to work when the temperature gets down to almost freezing. The next idea was something else that we did to our water line. We dug up the earth down to the water line, about 4 foot or so, then made the trench a little over 4 feet wide. We put 4x8 sheets of 2" thick blue styrofoam over the water line from our well to the pump in the crawlspace under the house. The frost has to go down to the four foot level then around the styrofoam before it freezes the water line. We haven't had a frozen water line since installing the styrofoam and the retro-line. Something else you might consider is if you go with the heat source in the pump house is to put a thermostat in there that has a contact for a predetermined temp to turn on your heat source, and another contact that will trigger some sort of light or buzzer to tell you that the heat source isn't working and the temperature is getting too low. It might be cheaper to have two thermostats. Anyway, that's the way that I would do it. Good Luck.....
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I constructed the joist headers and joists on three 4x4 runners. In an attempt to insulate the floor, I installed insulated board in between the joists as seen in the photo. The flooring is a 3/4 plywood. I then cut a 4 1/2 inch hole in the floor for the 4 inch tile to route through, which will act as piping and wire conduit.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After the floor was constructed, I used the 4044M and the pallet fork to lift, move it from the barn, and set the entire floor down on the piers, over the tile. The whole process went very smooth and strangely was much easier than I thought to get it level. My father-in-law was nice enough to help me frame it this weekend, and get it ready for siding.
 

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As always, your design and workmanship is excellent! It's great too to have an extra set of hands and eyes when doing...anything! Keep up the great work, we'll be watching! Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I told my wife she needs to be in more photos. She rolled her eyes, and said maybe, lol. Nonetheless, I moved the painted T1-11 plywood out to the build site and installed anchors as shown in the photos. Admittedly, this week wasn't too productive with the pump shed. Had some unexpected work that took priority. I am gonna try to get exterior on this week. We'll see.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I don't know about ya'll, but once August hits, my schedule gets busy! Quite of few things have been done. Not going into too much detail, but it's been framed, and siding started as shown in the photo. I will include more photos after working on it this weekend. Holiday weekend and no work scheduled so I should be able to get quite a bit accomplished.
 

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"No work scheduled" He he, NO SUCH THING! Your shop may not have scheduled work, but that leaves you free to work at home. There's ALWAYS work someplace...in the shop, at home. As a home owner, I'm pretty sure you already know this.

As with your last shed build. I'm gonna suggest/recommend a gloss white in the interior. No much else I can add. As always, it seems that your thoughts and plans are well thought out before you start a project.

BTW, I LIKE the carry-all you made for the back of your 4044! Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #15
When I said "No work scheduled", I meant my real job. It was nice to have a holiday in which I didn't have work scheduled so I could focus on my own stuff. I ALWAYS have work at home, the farm, property, etc. Yes, being an "owner" of anything requires work if you want it to last.

Quite a bit of work was done on the building this weekend - but didn't get pictures. Will get them tonight when I head out there.

Thanks! The carry-all has been great. I use it a lot more than I thought I would when I built it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Update - confirmed with electric company to run power from the main steel building to the pump shed. They said the will be able to install it by the end of October, so we'll see. Next week I intend on calling the water company to see when they want to install the power and water line to the well. It's difficult to trench once it freezes here in Ohio, so they may want to trench beforehand. Normally though, I would install power, then install the water equipment afterwards.

As for the build, I have all the exterior trim up except for two pieces on the front and back. Once those are up I will clear caulk, and the outside will be done. I have already moved to the inside. Door including handle and lock installed. R13 insulation has been installed on the right wall, with 1/2 plywood covering it.

Task moving ahead.

Install insulation and interior walls (left wall to wait until electric company dude comes out to see what he's getting into, and approval to move forward with wall - maybe overkill, but need to make sure)
Caulk interior where wall meets the roof, so there are to gaps for water/wind
Install flooring - wasn't going to but I got free leftover subfloor left over from a friend's house build
Install ceiling
Figure out if and how I will insulate the roof - open for suggestions. Right now there is only a ridge-vent
Trim the interior
Install lights (after electricity)

Photos:
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
The exterior is done. Now moving to inside to complete insulation, install walls, ceiling, along with flooring. Since it's been so hot here I am waiting until next week to work further on the interior.
 

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Hmm, Ridge vent ?? I'd forget about that, spray foam insulation from the inside, and install to vents on your end side walls...like above the door and the same in the rear. That way, you can staple Kraft-backed fiberglass insulation to your rafters...roof will be insulated and building will "breathe" through the end vents. Just my thoughts, Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks rwmeyer for the feedback. In retrospect, I should of done it that way. Your way would of made a cleaner build. Unfortunately, since I already installed the internal cross beams for support, which required me to cut the internal plywood about four inches shorter than what your way would of required, and the fact that I already purchased material for my original way, I am gonna stick to my plan. Again, thanks!

So FINALLY got electricity installed, so pace should pick up.

Going forward, the intent of the pump shed is to primary house and secure the electrical components, the pressure tank, and gear, and attempt to prevent the pipes from freezing when I attempt to use this in the winter. The building will remained locked, and will likely be entered infrequently. While I will not enter the building that much, it will be used often from the outside accessing water. I plan on having the faucets on the outside wall, with an external light overhead, with an external switch to control the lights. I considered motion lights, but the sensors can be annoying (turning off when you want them, turning on when you don't). For this building, a manual external light is necessary.

Rundown:
I ordered outdoor light - should be here by the end of the week
Bought the electrical components
Called the water guy to install water components
Install vents

I plan on wiring it up this week and weekend, and finishing the last part of the wall. Once that is done I can install the floor and ceiling.

Attached is a pic of the pump shed so far with electricity installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Most of the electrical components installed as for this stage. Outdoor light, light switch and outlets installed. I also installed low vents to let air in. All interior walls are done, with three panels of ceiling to go. Tomorrow, water guy will be here to installed the well pump, pressure tank, run water line, and wire it up. Once he is done, I will installed the last parts of interior ceiling, one more outlet, some trim, and some odd and ends. That will be the end of of construction. Now, there will likely be some extras, like a small space heater, a thermostat controller, and some hooks, but all that is minor.

As promised earlier in the thread, here is one more of my wife working on it with me. She's assisting in wiring the lights, switches, and junction box. Strangely, she has found she likes wiring. Everything works and check out afterwards, so sure.
 

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