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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
While sweating profusely at an Estate sale recently, wait a minute, heck, when are we not sweating down here in Texas during the summer?:lol: Back to story. Went to a sale where as usual I found myself heading towards the garage to find guy stuff.
It's hard to find a reason to go in any other direction at sales when there are all kinds of goodies waiting to be discovered in the manly areas of a house.:thumbup1gif:

After digging through piles of ammo reloading supplies and the usual pliers, something was trying to get my attention over in a dusty, dark corner. Saw two twin electric horn sets and thought I might should inquire about them. Lady running the sale said she had a Model T Ford and that these horns came off a Model T.

Is this true that these came from a Model T? Doesn't look like any of the ones typically shown online.

What y'all think?

Figured someone familiar with them here would know. The only words I can find are: DELCO REMY

Thanks
 

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My guess is no. That looks like a newer horn than model A even. Definitly not ooga horn. Fact they are delco would make me think GM.

Late 40s and early 50s GM horns looked a lot like that.

Just a guess.

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for that. Somehow I missed that thread before.

WOW!!! You weren't kidding about horn experts. :laugh:

Spent many moments as a kid pumping my arms up and down trying to get truckers to honk.

Must've done if often enough to be remembered, because when I was old enough to attend school and was away learning my abc's, different trucks would go by the house and blow the horns all the time.
My mom knew well my fondness for big trucks and tractors, but didn't catch on at first why trucks were still honking when I was away at school.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wow those horns are loud. Guess maybe this heat is getting to me, because any other time I probably wouldn't have believed someone saying that those horns fit on a car.

Both sets sound just like big rig horns. The larger pair are the loudest. I asked a buddy of mine in law enforcement if he thought I'd get in trouble for installing them on one of my pickups. He knows traffic laws, but isn't sure about horns. I just wish they'd help kill the mosquitos. They are bad this year.
Some people here have been installing train horns on their cars.

Don't think I want to go that route.
 

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I'm thinking that could be a later 50's,possibly even very early 60's Cadillac horn. A friend of my father had a pink '59 and a robin egg blue '60 sedan deville. I am fairly certain I saw that type of horn on the fender well,and did those things sound oh so nice.:thumbup1gif:


Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm thinking that could be a later 50's,possibly even very early 60's Cadillac horn. A friend of my father had a pink '59 and a robin egg blue '60 sedan deville. I am fairly certain I saw that type of horn on the fender well,and did those things sound oh so nice.:thumbup1gif:


Greg
Thanks for that info. Sure appreciate it. I'm honestly entertaining the idea of installing the pair shown in the first and second pic on a pickup.

Hope the horn experts on here can give me a list of what is needed in the way of materials to install them. They do sound really nice.
 

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Hope the horn experts on here can give me a list of what is needed in the way of materials to install them..
I sent them both PM's to make sure they saw the thread.
 

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First off, are they air or electric? The pictures look like air. If they're actually air horns, then I doubt they were used on a passenger car. I'm sure it's possible, but I don't recall who might have done it. They might be off an old semi truck. Cool horns.

Depending on what they use for power, the hookups will obviously be different. Electric is pretty straightforward, you need a hot wire to a switch, then to the horns. They may ground through the horn body, or they may have a separate spot to attach a ground wire.

For air horns, the general principle is the same. You need a source of air, and a valve. If you want to get fancy you can add a 12 volt air compressor onto your truck to keep the air tank full. That comes in handy for fixing flat tires, and if your system is big enough you can run an impact wrench off of it. That can get expensive, though. DOT certified tanks and quality 12v compressors (not the stuff from auto parts stores) can run into the hundreds of dollars.

For a simple system, you first need a tank. Decide where you want to put it. In the bed is the easiest, but you do lose some cargo capacity. Beneath the body on the frame is cleaner looking, but can be a bit more difficult and costly to find a tank that will fit. If you want to buy a turnkey setup, you can find them online. However, you can put one together pretty easily. Once you decide where to put the tank, go find a semi truck scrapyard. Some of them will remove the tanks and sort them, others just let you pick over the trucks as they sit. Find the tank you want, and try to get the mounting brackets for it as well. If you're putting it in the bed, you can usually use the semi truck brackets to bolt the tank straight into the bed. If you're going underneath the body, expect to do some custom fabrication to make it work. Do not cut, weld, or otherwise modify the tank. When looking at used tanks, check them very carefully for rust. We're dealing with about 100 PSI here, which is enough to warrant caution. Do not weld on a tank. If it has rust pinholes, leave it alone. Once a tank starts to rust out, it's not worth fixing. One pinhole is a sign that the metal in that area is rusting significantly from the inside. Some tanks are coated internally with a rust preventative, welding on one of them will burn the coating off.

Look at your tank, and you will probably see several threaded ports. You will need to utilize two of them for your horn, one for air coming in and one for air going out. You can plug all the others, the number and location of them will vary depending on your tank. You will need air fittings, and hose. For those horns, I would suggest you start with 1/4" DOT air line. You can move up to 3/8" if you need to, but 1/4" should flow enough unless you're running a large horn. Be sure to get actual, DOT rated air line. For your line, fittings, thread size adapters, and plugs I recommend you go to a semi truck repair shop. There are two type of air fittings, the compression style and the push- lock style. Stay away from the push locks. They make an easier install, but don't hold up over time. They have a rubber o-ring inside that seals them. Over time, dirt and crud will not only cause that o-ring to fail and leak, but the push connectors will seize up. The only way to get it loose is usually to cut the line, which makes it too short to reuse. I much prefer the brass fittings with the nut and ferrule that go over the line and crimp it down into the brass fitting. I like to use blue Loc-Tite on brass air fittings.

Once we have our tank and line, we need a valve. There are two different types, manual and electric. Electric can be easier to install if you're comfortable with wiring, because you can put it anywhere. With a manual valve, you have to be able to use a cable or linkage to actuate it. I prefer the manual valve, even though it is a bit tougher to find a mounting location. Ball valves from the hardware store can work, but you will be disappointed. They take too long to open. You can look for a manual valve in the semi truck junkyard, but expect to disassemble the overheard console to get one out if it's a pull your own part type place. Otherwise, go back to the truck service shop and ask their parts guys what they have. Once you have your valve, simply run a line to your horns. Use as few angled fittings as you can get away with. They're not bad, but I believe a 45* angle fitting is the equivalent of adding 6' to your air line, and a 90* is equivalent to about 9'. It's been a few years since I had to worry about knowing that. It's no big deal for a horn, but it gets important when you're working on an air brake system. :laugh:

So now we have our tank, valve, and horns but there's no air in the tank. If you go with an on board compressor, mount it wherever you like, wire it up and plumb it into your tank. If you decide to fill off of a shop compressor, I like to simply put a female quick connect on the tank. Make an adapter out of two male fittings and a ball valve. Use that to connect your air hose to the tank and fill it. It's not a bad idea to put a gauge on the tank, or even run a line and put the gauge in the cab somewhere that you can see it.

That's the general idea of it. Let us know if you have any specific questions! :good2:
 

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I'm not sure what else to say besides what 56FG has already said!

They don't look familiar. Look too new to be on a Model T, but too new to be on a car. Not many cars since the early 20th century would have what we consider a typical air horn we see on a truck. That said, those don't look like what would be on the roof of a truck either.

The one on the right looks like it would be an electric horn, the left looks like it would be air. Some pictures of the back and bottom of them would help.

I've done the steps 56FG outline more than once. Bigger hose, means a it's louder, but uses more pressure. I have 3/8ths with a 150PSI compressor for my boats horns which is loud as heck! Pitch will also change how you perceive the loudness though. I have a firetruck horn on my golf car with a 1/4 inch line and only fill it up to 110PSI. The golf car seems way louder as it's just piercing. And I agree, the electric solenoids are a POS! Nothing like giving a yank on a good valve!

If you have any specific questions, I'm sure on of us will be able to help you :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm not sure what else to say besides what 56FG has already said!

They don't look familiar. Look too new to be on a Model T, but too new to be on a car. Not many cars since the early 20th century would have what we consider a typical air horn we see on a truck. That said, those don't look like what would be on the roof of a truck either.

The one on the right looks like it would be an electric horn, the left looks like it would be air. Some pictures of the back and bottom of them would help.

I've done the steps 56FG outline more than once. Bigger hose, means a it's louder, but uses more pressure. I have 3/8ths with a 150PSI compressor for my boats horns which is loud as heck! Pitch will also change how you perceive the loudness though. I have a firetruck horn on my golf car with a 1/4 inch line and only fill it up to 110PSI. The golf car seems way louder as it's just piercing. And I agree, the electric solenoids are a POS! Nothing like giving a yank on a good valve!

If you have any specific questions, I'm sure on of us will be able to help you :)
Thanks so much. I'll probably have to ask y'all some questions in the future. Sorry, but I failed to mention that both pairs are electric. Think I'll try the larger pair on my truck. Might just sell the other pair. Those horns helped bring the kid back out in this guy.:yahoo:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
First off, are they air or electric? The pictures look like air. If they're actually air horns, then I doubt they were used on a passenger car. I'm sure it's possible, but I don't recall who might have done it. They might be off an old semi truck. Cool horns.

Depending on what they use for power, the hookups will obviously be different. Electric is pretty straightforward, you need a hot wire to a switch, then to the horns. They may ground through the horn body, or they may have a separate spot to attach a ground wire.

For air horns, the general principle is the same. You need a source of air, and a valve. If you want to get fancy you can add a 12 volt air compressor onto your truck to keep the air tank full. That comes in handy for fixing flat tires, and if your system is big enough you can run an impact wrench off of it. That can get expensive, though. DOT certified tanks and quality 12v compressors (not the stuff from auto parts stores) can run into the hundreds of dollars.

For a simple system, you first need a tank. Decide where you want to put it. In the bed is the easiest, but you do lose some cargo capacity. Beneath the body on the frame is cleaner looking, but can be a bit more difficult and costly to find a tank that will fit. If you want to buy a turnkey setup, you can find them online. However, you can put one together pretty easily. Once you decide where to put the tank, go find a semi truck scrapyard. Some of them will remove the tanks and sort them, others just let you pick over the trucks as they sit. Find the tank you want, and try to get the mounting brackets for it as well. If you're putting it in the bed, you can usually use the semi truck brackets to bolt the tank straight into the bed. If you're going underneath the body, expect to do some custom fabrication to make it work. Do not cut, weld, or otherwise modify the tank. When looking at used tanks, check them very carefully for rust. We're dealing with about 100 PSI here, which is enough to warrant caution. Do not weld on a tank. If it has rust pinholes, leave it alone. Once a tank starts to rust out, it's not worth fixing. One pinhole is a sign that the metal in that area is rusting significantly from the inside. Some tanks are coated internally with a rust preventative, welding on one of them will burn the coating off.

Look at your tank, and you will probably see several threaded ports. You will need to utilize two of them for your horn, one for air coming in and one for air going out. You can plug all the others, the number and location of them will vary depending on your tank. You will need air fittings, and hose. For those horns, I would suggest you start with 1/4" DOT air line. You can move up to 3/8" if you need to, but 1/4" should flow enough unless you're running a large horn. Be sure to get actual, DOT rated air line. For your line, fittings, thread size adapters, and plugs I recommend you go to a semi truck repair shop. There are two type of air fittings, the compression style and the push- lock style. Stay away from the push locks. They make an easier install, but don't hold up over time. They have a rubber o-ring inside that seals them. Over time, dirt and crud will not only cause that o-ring to fail and leak, but the push connectors will seize up. The only way to get it loose is usually to cut the line, which makes it too short to reuse. I much prefer the brass fittings with the nut and ferrule that go over the line and crimp it down into the brass fitting. I like to use blue Loc-Tite on brass air fittings.

Once we have our tank and line, we need a valve. There are two different types, manual and electric. Electric can be easier to install if you're comfortable with wiring, because you can put it anywhere. With a manual valve, you have to be able to use a cable or linkage to actuate it. I prefer the manual valve, even though it is a bit tougher to find a mounting location. Ball valves from the hardware store can work, but you will be disappointed. They take too long to open. You can look for a manual valve in the semi truck junkyard, but expect to disassemble the overheard console to get one out if it's a pull your own part type place. Otherwise, go back to the truck service shop and ask their parts guys what they have. Once you have your valve, simply run a line to your horns. Use as few angled fittings as you can get away with. They're not bad, but I believe a 45* angle fitting is the equivalent of adding 6' to your air line, and a 90* is equivalent to about 9'. It's been a few years since I had to worry about knowing that. It's no big deal for a horn, but it gets important when you're working on an air brake system. :laugh:

So now we have our tank, valve, and horns but there's no air in the tank. If you go with an on board compressor, mount it wherever you like, wire it up and plumb it into your tank. If you decide to fill off of a shop compressor, I like to simply put a female quick connect on the tank. Make an adapter out of two male fittings and a ball valve. Use that to connect your air hose to the tank and fill it. It's not a bad idea to put a gauge on the tank, or even run a line and put the gauge in the cab somewhere that you can see it.

That's the general idea of it. Let us know if you have any specific questions! :good2:
Wow, thanks for that very informative and useful info. These are both electric, but think I'll try the louder pair out for a while. Guess this is how the horn addiction starts.:empathy3: I'm not sure that I want to go the train horn route, so the 18 wheeler air horns will probably work for me next.
Think I'll start looking around for used horns first and see what can be found.

Thanks again for the info. You and Martian are very knowledgable on many subjects, including air horns.:thumbup1gif:

Have a Great Day!!
 

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I'm not sure that I want to go the train horn route,
Those are a definite no-no unless you're by yourself on some lonesome dirt road where all you'll scare are the poor little animals.:)


Greg
 

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Thanks again for the info. You and Martian are very knowledgable on many subjects, including air horns.:thumbup1gif:

Have a Great Day!!
Thanks! Nice to be able to offer at least a bit of information every once in a while. :good2:

A big +1 on the train horns being saved for the middle of nowhere, too. They can really be deafening. My big horn really requires ear protection if you're within about 10' of it, and probably further than that if you're in front of it.
 
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