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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The dealer was supposed to replace the pistons and rings under warranty on my 2012 GMC Terrain 2.4l because of my excess oil burning. After the work was done I noticed the engine was still really dirty as before. Looks like it was never worked on. So I removed the spark plugs to look at the top of the pistons. The pistons had some black carbon buildup in the center of the pistons. Also noticed some pitting on the pistons also. Is the new pistons supposed to look like that after 1000 miles?
I called the dealer to ask them if they really did the work. The service writer says he seen the engine torn apart in the shop. I also asked if they honed the cylinders? They said no that is not required.
I guess I will wait another 3000 miles to see if it still burning oil. Because it consumed 4 quarts of oil in 5000 miles before the repair.
 

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Can you ask to see the old parts?
 

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Did you ask to see them after you pulled the plugs or when you picked it up?

I'd be tempted to call the regional factory rep to see if the dealer actually returned anything - or if they're required to.

I've never really done much work on car engines, but I did work my way through school repairing small engines on lawn and garden equipment. Replacing the piston and rings required a complete tear down and removal of the engine from the piece of equipment. Generally when we were doing something like that, we cleaned the grease off of everything to clean it up as much as possible. Usually the block would go in the parts washer.

Did the replace the plugs too? I would hope so.

I don't want to say the dealer is being less than upfront with you, but.... :unknown:

Good luck getting this resolved.
 

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Often, when they are going to do a major repair such as replacing pistons, they power wash the engine and compartment as it makes the work a little easier and it also prevents crud from getting into opened up components. If the engine looks as dirty as before, it doesn't mean they didn't work on it, but it sure seems less likely.

Also, at 1,000 miles, the pistons should look more new than old. Could they have carbon build up? Its possible but very unlikely. Do you run ethanol based fuel?

An engine consuming oil by burning it would have REQUIRED new piston rings and its always been my practice when installing new rings to hone the cylinder as it cleans up the slight wear marks but it also helps break in the new piston rings. Otherwise, you are running brand new rings over cylinder walls which have some wear patterns. The honing won't remove the wear patterns, but it will "scuff up" the cylinder walls, which in my opinion, help break in the new rings.

I wonder if they just put new piston rings in your engine and used the old pistons because they miked out OK from a measurement perspective. But that's a lot of oil use to burn, basically a quart per thousand miles.........

I think your doubts are certainly valid. Now lets see what happens in the next 3,000 miles.

Get an itemized copy of the parts they allegely replaced. I would want a written record of the items they claimed they replaced in case the engine has to be torn down again.

With that much oil consumption, I would have thought they would have put a short block in as a replacement as it would be a way to assure you they actually solved the problem. Plus the short blocks are assembled in a production setting which gives a more consistent result. It would be more costly in parts but save on labor.....Its what I would have wanted done if it were my vehicle.
 

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The dealer was supposed to replace the pistons and rings under warranty on my 2012 GMC Terrain 2.4l because of my excess oil burning. After the work was done I noticed the engine was still really dirty as before. Looks like it was never worked on. So I removed the spark plugs to look at the top of the pistons. The pistons had some black carbon buildup in the center of the pistons. Also noticed some pitting on the pistons also. Is the new pistons supposed to look like that after 1000 miles?
I called the dealer to ask them if they really did the work. The service writer says he seen the engine torn apart in the shop. I also asked if they honed the cylinders? They said no that is not required.
I guess I will wait another 3000 miles to see if it still burning oil. Because it consumed 4 quarts of oil in 5000 miles before the repair.
I would do a compression test to see what it is now compared to new specs!
 

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The dealer was supposed to replace the pistons and rings under warranty on my 2012 GMC Terrain 2.4l because of my excess oil burning. After the work was done I noticed the engine was still really dirty as before. Looks like it was never worked on. So I removed the spark plugs to look at the top of the pistons. The pistons had some black carbon buildup in the center of the pistons. Also noticed some pitting on the pistons also. Is the new pistons supposed to look like that after 1000 miles?
I called the dealer to ask them if they really did the work. The service writer says he seen the engine torn apart in the shop. I also asked if they honed the cylinders? They said no that is not required.
I guess I will wait another 3000 miles to see if it still burning oil. Because it consumed 4 quarts of oil in 5000 miles before the repair.
Sounds like very shoddy, incompetent, work if any was done. I would never install rings in glazed cylinders without honing and I sure as heck wouldn't tear down and engine and put it back together with all the dirt on it.

If it still burns oil I would insist on a before and after leak down test on the next go round.
 

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For excess oil consumption they may not have changed the whole piston. If the piston still passed the measurements they may have just put new rings in it. I doubt they would have just changed the oil sealing ring but it is possible.

My guess is the piston dimensions passed tolerances and they just swapped out the rings. If I were doing this to my own vehicle I would have done the same thing.
 

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Are you sure they didn't just replace the rings?
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Are you sure they didn't just replace the rings?
I also received a new parts list what they used with the receipt on picking up the vehicle. Going from my memory it said new pistons, rings, timing chains, tensioner and seals. The parts list was longer but that is all I can remember right now.
I did some research on the pistons replacement and they will have to tear it down from the bottom of the engine and remove the oil pan and crank.
 

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Usually , Crate engine should be done . New block and rotating mass . I am talking OEM ,not Jasper or whatever . Cheaper than a overhaul at a dealership . These new techs are not capable of an engine overhaul . You are probably going to be unhappy . Kevin .
 

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Usually , Crate engine should be done . New block and rotating mass . I am talking OEM ,not Jasper or whatever . Cheaper than a overhaul at a dealership . These new techs are not capable of an engine overhaul . You are probably going to be unhappy . Kevin .
I think you are correct about the owner of the car not being happy in the long haul with the result. I am very surprised a dealer would replace piston's in an engine without pulling the engine out of the vehicle and putting the engine on the stand so you could properly torque the rods and mains and check all the bearings, etc.

The pistons are generally inserted from the top of the cylinder using a ring compressor and tapped into place and then connected to the crank journals and torqued. It might not be impossible to replace the pistons from the bottom end, but it sure is less than ideal for doing it right with steering linkages, frame cross members and DIRT to deal with..........

It's hard to properly set a crankshaft in an engine working over your head, verses on an engine stand (I personally wouldn't do it). Trying to position the main bearings and other such critical steps are even harder when gravity is working against you...............

For the OP's sake, I hope the engine runs great and doesn't burn oil. But I think the odds are against that if they didn't pull the engine and do this repair correctly.
 

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For what it is worth, I work for a dealer group that includes a GM dealer and several Ford stores. I have been in the car business for 30 years, including service. I am in our shop every week. And most every time I am in there, I see a 2.4 Ecotec 4 cyl getting new pistons for the oil consumption issue. Lots of info online if you are interested. Anyway, it is GM's answer to oil usage issues on that engine. Since GM is paying for the repair, they instruct the dealer what to do and how much they will pay for the repair. The dealer is not participating in the repair financially and generally does no more than GM authorizes and pays for. And I can tell you if GM is paying for it, the dealer is not making any money or may even be losing money. GM does not overpay for warranty work. That being said, it is a very common issue with this engine, and this type of repair has been made this way many thousands of times. This motor is in many GM vehicles, not just GMC Terrains and Chevy Equinoxes...although those two seem to be the most problematic. I am not aware that there have been a lot of comebacks or customer dissatisfaction after the repair is done. In many cases the repair is being made on a vehicle that is out of its regular basic and powertrain warranty either by miles driven or in-service date (age). GM looks at this as a "goodwill" repair, but clearly the original design was deficient. Oil consumption has become an issue for many manufacturers in the last several years in the quest for fuel efficiency. This is mostly due to specifications for much thinner oil and piston ring designs that were intended to reduce friction and reciprocating assembly drag. Some of these motors use oil from day one, such as my wife's Subaru Outback. Others just wear out more quickly. Toyota, Subaru, Mazda, even Honda all have had similar issues. But GM's seem to be the worst.
 

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As a loyal GM customer and an avid member of the Colorado forums for the past 12+ years, I am sorry to have to agree with what @ 2mtrucks is saying. While I have not have had any oil consumption issues on my 2016 V6, MANY of the users there have complained about this almost as a religious rite of passage. For GM (or any other manufacturer) to state that 1/2 to 1 quart of oil per 1000 miles is considered 'normal' is preposterous. And they will only take action if it exceeds that amount.

If you want to make yourself sick, here are 2 reports. The first is from Consumer reports and the 2nd is from GM
GM clearly states half a quart per 1000 miles is acceptable. Gone are the days when you could change your oil every 3-5000 miles and expect that you didn't go below your proper oil level and thus, possibly inducing damage to your engine. :banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead:

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2015/06/excessive-oil-consumption/index.htm

https://gm.oemdtc.com/698/information-on-engine-oil-consumption-guidelines-2018-and-prior-gm-passenger-cars-and-gasoline-powered-light-duty-trucks
 

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As a loyal GM customer and an avid member of the Colorado forums for the past 12+ years, I am sorry to have to agree with what @ 2mtrucks is saying. While I have not have had any oil consumption issues on my 2016 V6, MANY of the users there have complained about this almost as a religious rite of passage. For GM (or any other manufacturer) to state that 1/2 to 1 quart of oil per 1000 miles is considered 'normal' is preposterous. And they will only take action if it exceeds that amount.

If you want to make yourself sick, here are 2 reports. The first is from Consumer reports and the 2nd is from GM
GM clearly states half a quart per 1000 miles is acceptable. Gone are the days when you could change your oil every 3-5000 miles and expect that you didn't go below your proper oil level and thus, possibly inducing damage to your engine. :banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead:

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2015/06/excessive-oil-consumption/index.htm

https://gm.oemdtc.com/698/information-on-engine-oil-consumption-guidelines-2018-and-prior-gm-passenger-cars-and-gasoline-powered-light-duty-trucks
I thought I recognized your username. I am not a member of the Colorado forum but I am a nearly daily reader. I also have a Colorado. Yours is a 2016 and mines a diesel so we both have escaped all the transmission issues, luckily. We bought a new Subaru Outback in 2013. Oil light came on at 1600 miles. Found out it affected most every 2013 and 2014 Subaru 4 cyl. Rather that tearing a new engine apart we just put up with. There was a class action settlement made but it was mostly BS. From what I can ascertain, the new piston fix seems to work in the 2.4 eco. It seems strange. Couple techs in the shop call it "the 2.4 100k service". Tech humor , I suppose. I don't know what the expected service life is after the repair, but I will give GM some credit for doing it. Some other manufacturers have done nothing.
 

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Yes, I have indeed been lucky with mine. I escaped the oil line blow outs the 2015s had and only needed my trans modules to be reprogrammed. Otherwise, I love my truck. Besides it being the worlds first ZR-71 (A Z71 with the factory ZR2 hood, which I had the same week the first ZR2s hit the assembly line......its good to have friends in some places) :lol:

Sorry to derail this topic but for some that may not know, GM is having a SUPER SERIOUS issue right now with the 2018-19 (and suspect it will be in the 2020) Colorado/Canyons due to major transmission problems with their 8 speed automatics. So far they have been changing torque convertors like they are going out of style and now their fix is to change to a new special blend of ATF fluid.....that fix is too new and the jury is out on whether this is will be fixing the problems of transmission shudder while driving.

And come on @2mtrucks join the crowd there..... just make sure you show us your truck on your 1st day or we yell at you. :laugh::laugh:

Q6ZIoNT.jpg
 

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As a loyal GM customer and an avid member of the Colorado forums for the past 12+ years, I am sorry to have to agree with what @ 2mtrucks is saying. While I have not have had any oil consumption issues on my 2016 V6, MANY of the users there have complained about this almost as a religious rite of passage. For GM (or any other manufacturer) to state that 1/2 to 1 quart of oil per 1000 miles is considered 'normal' is preposterous. And they will only take action if it exceeds that amount.

If you want to make yourself sick, here are 2 reports. The first is from Consumer reports and the 2nd is from GM
GM clearly states half a quart per 1000 miles is acceptable. Gone are the days when you could change your oil every 3-5000 miles and expect that you didn't go below your proper oil level and thus, possibly inducing damage to your engine. :banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead:

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2015/06/excessive-oil-consumption/index.htm

https://gm.oemdtc.com/698/information-on-engine-oil-consumption-guidelines-2018-and-prior-gm-passenger-cars-and-gasoline-powered-light-duty-trucks
That is sad news indeed. NONE of my vehicles or tractors use ANY oil between changes. I have two Fords with over 100,000 miles and a Kia with 140,000 on it. One of the Fords, my F150, has 177,000 and has pulled a trailer with a Mustang on it all over the SE. The Mustang has 115,000 miles that are like dog miles since it's been raced and tracked from the day I bought it. I have actually been guilty of not checking the oil level between changes but I'm trying to get out of that mindset. I run 5W20 Motorcraft synthetic blend on both of the Fords and oil change intervals are done at 5,000 miles. My tractors both get 15W40 Motorcraft synthetic blend Diesel oil. The Kia Dealer gave us a lifetime powertrain warranty if we have the service done there so it gets whatever oil they put in it. So far they haven't given me any grief about doing my own non covered repairs which have been few.
 

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No question that oil consumption was thought to be an issue that faded in the early 1980s or so. I can remember when it was a habit to check your oil every other fill up, and it was not unusual to add some. By the late 1980s, with the advent of better tolerances, fuel injection, much better gaskets and sealing ( with the exception of Ford and GM big blocks) adding oil between changes became a rarity. Now, in the name of efficiency and performance there are again oil consumption problems. Probably just because I am old, I think the pinnacle of performance, reliability, affordability etc was 1996-2006. Especially in anything diesel powered. And even in gas engines, things like Active Fuel Management, direct injection, cam phasers, cylinder deactivation,...all these thing that have helped eek out a (very) few more MPGs and HP do not contribute to AFFORDABLE mechanical longevity. And we wont even get into what happened to diesels. That's for another forum.
 

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No question that oil consumption was thought to be an issue that faded in the early 1980s or so. I can remember when it was a habit to check your oil every other fill up, and it was not unusual to add some. By the late 1980s, with the advent of better tolerances, fuel injection, much better gaskets and sealing ( with the exception of Ford and GM big blocks) adding oil between changes became a rarity. Now, in the name of efficiency and performance there are again oil consumption problems. Probably just because I am old, I think the pinnacle of performance, reliability, affordability etc was 1996-2006. Especially in anything diesel powered. And even in gas engines, things like Active Fuel Management, direct injection, cam phasers, cylinder deactivation,...all these thing that have helped eek out a (very) few more MPGs and HP do not contribute to AFFORDABLE mechanical longevity. And we wont even get into what happened to diesels. That's for another forum.
Boy on my 2006 Dodge ram 2500 4x4 last oil change I needed a Quart to top it off but then I feel bad I went just 16,000 miles this time before changing he oil. I have 170,000 plus miles on it now. Same with my 4044M tractor never had to add any oil in the 370 hour of operating it but I have changed it 3 times so far. Happy with that on the Hemi just not happy with the HP compared to the Cummins pulling a load up a steep hill! I would sure be bummed if I used 1/2 qt per 1,000 miles of oil! That would have been 8 quarts between that change and I would be getting rid of that truck a long time ago!
 

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I don't understand how any vehicle BURNING oil can meet emission standards. I wonder how much that may shorten the life of the catalytic converter?

I did a short stint at a Harley dealer back in 75. The AMF/Harley Sportsters had a bad batch of rings. Any motorcycle that burned a quart of oil during it's 3000 mile warranty got new rings. Some of the re-ringed bikes came back because ALL the standard size rings were not heat treated properly. We were having to use .010" rings and file the end gaps to fit the standard bore.
 
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