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Discussion Starter #1
I gotta vent... what happened with the legs on most recent LCD TVs? When did all the manufacturers get together and agree to switch from a nice sturdy pedestal to something that looks like chopsticks sticking out the bottom?

My 13-year old Sony LCD finally crapped out with a bad power supply. It had a nice wide pedestal in the center that was not only very sturdy but it allowed you to easily turn (angle) the TV from side to side by pivoting on the pedestal. If needed, it also had a little strap (aka seat belt) on the back edge of the pedestal that you could attach to your TV stand to prevent the TV from ever falling over (or being pulled over by a child).

Enter the new stuff... why does virtually everything now have these two tiny sets of "bird legs" on the bottom edge that are placed almost as wide apart as the TV frame? The pedestal allowed you to place a 4-foot wide TV on a stand that was a quite bit smaller. Now you need a TV stand that is almost as wide as the TV itself. And since the new "bird legs" stick out the front and back the same distance you can't even push the TV back on the stand because the rear set of "bird legs" might slip off.

Why? What am I missing? When did all the TV makers get together and agree to "Do it stupid style?".

Thanks for listening. :)
 

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I'm sure it's a money thing. Costs less to manufacture/purchase "bird legs" than the more robust and sturdy pedestals. I would also believe that more and more people aren't even using the legs any longer as most are wall mounting their TV's.

:gizmo:
 

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The other type base was in the box,,,
you just did not dig through all the packing material enough to find the second base,,,:flag_of_truce:










:laugh:
You know how to tell my post is false?? :unknown:

Millennials would not know how to get to second base,,,, :lolol:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The other type base was in the box,,,
you just did not dig through all the packing material enough to find the second base,,,:flag_of_truce:

:laugh:
I wish. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm sure it's a money thing. Costs less to manufacture/purchase "bird legs" than the more robust and sturdy pedestals. I would also believe that more and more people aren't even using the legs any longer as most are wall mounting their TV's.

:gizmo:
Probably - but don't get me started with that. Why everyone thinks the cool thing to do is have your TV on the wall. I was always taught (and believe) that the proper viewing angle for a display is straight-on or looking down slightly. Why does everyone want to sit and look UP on the wall? You know, because you just HAVE to mount it above the mantel.

I love how all the advertisements for wall mounted TVs magically erase the power cord, multiple HDMI cables, Component cable and maybe even a Composite cable. Not to mention additional audio cables. :)
 

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Probably - but don't get me started with that. Why everyone thinks the cool thing to do is have your TV on the wall. I was always taught (and believe) that the proper viewing angle for a display is straight-on or looking down slightly. Why does everyone want to sit and look UP on the wall? You know, because you just HAVE to mount it above the mantel.

I love how all the advertisements for wall mounted TVs magically erase the power cord, multiple HDMI cables, Component cable and maybe even a Composite cable. Not to mention additional audio cables. :)
Another case of monkey see, monkey do. If one company does something to cut costs then everyone jumps on board. I wouldn't mind them doing this is they made it a choice, but that seldom happens anymore.

I've run into these stupid legs with the last 2 TV's purchased. I also don't want my TV's mounted to the wall and liked the center base that TV's used to have for setting on a stand or table, but impossible to find these anymore. The new chicken-leg stands were so spread-eagled and offset on one of my new TV's that it would not fit on the stand I had been using before. I wound up buying a table-top VESA mount stand similar to this. Ridiculous that you have to do this but I saw no other option.

TV stand
 

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They don't want you to use the legs at all. I think most of them expect that you'll hang it using a wall mount system.
 

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What's with the cable on the back to supposedly keep it from tipping forwards? It can tip backwards just as easy as forwards. Monkey see monkey do. :dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Another case of monkey see, monkey do. If one company does something to cut costs then everyone jumps on board. I wouldn't mind them doing this is they made it a choice, but that seldom happens anymore.

I've run into these stupid legs with the last 2 TV's purchased. I also don't want my TV's mounted to the wall and liked the center base that TV's used to have for setting on a stand or table, but impossible to find these anymore. The new chicken-leg stands were so spread-eagled and offset on one of my new TV's that it would not fit on the stand I had been using before. I wound up buying a table-top VESA mount stand similar to this. Ridiculous that you have to do this but I saw no other option.

TV stand
Darn... I didn't even know there was such a thing. That looks like it might be just the ticket.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What's with the cable on the back to supposedly keep it from tipping forwards? It can tip backwards just as easy as forwards. Monkey see monkey do. :dunno:
When the TV is on a stand it typically has the back very close to the wall. So it physically cannot tip backwards (other than 5-10 degrees at which time it would be resting against the wall). However, it can very easily tip forward and fall onto to a small child.

This is the same logic as those little straps that attach to the back of a cloths dresser so it cannot tip forward and crush a child. It can't tip backwards because the wall is there.

:good2:
 

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What's with the cable on the back to supposedly keep it from tipping forwards? It can tip backwards just as easy as forwards. Monkey see monkey do. :dunno:
I think the TV engineers and marketing people see everyone putting the TV flat against the wall or a cabinet, or in a corner, etc. Look at all the images of how the TV's are shown mounted.....many unrealistic and highly impractical.

After all, who wouldn't want to take a large piece of sensitive electronics that cost's thousands of dollars and mount it above the fire place opening so all of the heat can rise out of the fireplace and go right into the bottom of the large plastic TV? Night after night of viewing with the fireplace in use means selling a new large TV that much sooner...................Depending upon the fireplace, some of the stuff on the mantle can get quite warm compared to elsewhere in the room, not to mention the stone or brick the TV is mounted against heating up with the fireplace use and radiating heat into the entire back of the TV.

I can't stand it when people mount the TV's on the wall and they have cords and cables running every direction. At least gather the cords and cables together with zip ties so they are organized and id possible, conceal them until they are down near the floor or behind another item or piece of furniture, cabinetry. All the cords running every direction are just chaos and sloppy looking.
 

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I think the TV engineers and marketing people see everyone putting the TV flat against the wall or a cabinet, or in a corner, etc. Look at all the images of how the TV's are shown mounted.....many unrealistic and highly impractical.

After all, who wouldn't want to take a large piece of sensitive electronics that cost's thousands of dollars and mount it above the fire place opening so all of the heat can rise out of the fireplace and go right into the bottom of the large plastic TV? Night after night of viewing with the fireplace in use means selling a new large TV that much sooner...................Depending upon the fireplace, some of the stuff on the mantle can get quite warm compared to elsewhere in the room, not to mention the stone or brick the TV is mounted against heating up with the fireplace use and radiating heat into the entire back of the TV.

I can't stand it when people mount the TV's on the wall and they have cords and cables running every direction. At least gather the cords and cables together with zip ties so they are organized and id possible, conceal them until they are down near the floor or behind another item or piece of furniture, cabinetry. All the cords running every direction are just chaos and sloppy looking.
I hate this too, and I always have so many things connected to mine that it's tough to hide all the cables even behind a cabinet. When we got our first big screen for the living room we got a cabinet from Sam's club for it that's been really good. Of course they've never had them again. It has shelves and drawers for storage, and a tubular pole built-in to the back of it to mount the TV on with a VESA mount. The mount on the TV then just hangs on the mount on the pole. The pole is hollow allowing cables to be run thru it to the floor. The mount also allows the TV to be swiveled a few degrees left or right.
 

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They don't want you to use the legs at all. I think most of them expect that you'll hang it using a wall mount system.
This, combined with more and more folks wanting various items like a cable box, DVD player, or maybe even a soundbar to possibly fit UNDER the TV have led to the outboard legs that we see today.

What's with the cable on the back to supposedly keep it from tipping forwards? It can tip backwards just as easy as forwards. Monkey see monkey do. :dunno:


The cable is not to protect the TV - it's to protect small children that might be in front of it if it were to fall in that direction. If the TV falls forward, and there's a small child in front of it, the child could be seriously hurt or even killed. This has happened and is why those cables are now included by default.

If it falls backwards, you might scrape the wall. ;)
 

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Well, I'm going to swim against the tide here. Most of our TVs are wall mounted. We have a 60" plasma in the TV room that I've had for near 10 years now. When I purchased it, it was $5K plus, and was state of the art and about as big as they came. As someone else posted, the optimum viewing position is to have the screened centered with the eyes when seated in the viewing location. It is pretty tough to find a piece of furniture that will yield that height, fit in the optimum viewing location, and provide the stability to protect your 60" plus TV from being tipped over and fracturing the screen. So I wall mounted it.

DSCN0499.JPG

Below is a custom built entertainment center, constructed 25+ years ago, where some forethought went into cable management.

DSCN0498.JPG

In the rear corners of each section, is an Oak upright that serves both as a shelf support and to conceal the cables. Behind this Oak upright, in the outside corners, is 6" spaced Plugmold to provide the 120VAC for the components. Behind the inner Oak uprights is slotted PVC wiring duct that the audio, video, control, & network cabling is routed. You can see the grey cover in the photo.

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DSCN0500.JPG

Below are photos of the TV in my study. Again, there just wasn't a good place for a pedestal mount.

DSCN0502.JPG

I built this home and did my own electrical. I did have the forethought to provide 120vac receptacles and low voltage wiring for the TVs. So no cables hanging down the wall. Our second home was a foreclosure project. It had a 5' crawl space beneath the living floor. So I fished in receptacles for the wall mount TVs as well as the low voltage cabling.

DSCN0503.JPG

Below is a photo of the entertainment center and TV in our beach house. When I re-constructed the beach house, the local land use ordinances would not allow me to expand the square footage of ground cover, so space was and is a premium. So I mounted the TV above the top of the window. It works, but on occasion, my neck becomes soar from the upward viewing angle. Again, there is a receptacle behind the TV. I also placed an 1-1/2" PVC conduit, with insulating bushings on each end, in the wall cavity. I then utilized either 4x4 mud rings or the fiber low voltage rings as low voltage cable wall openings. In this manner, I can reach my hand into the wall cavity to fish cables through the 1-1/2" conduit from the entertainment center, below, to the TV above.

BeachTV.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #17
This, combined with more and more folks wanting various items like a cable box, DVD player, or maybe even a soundbar to possibly fit UNDER the TV have led to the outboard legs that we see today.
Ironically my cable box (DVR) is too tall to fit under the TV when sitting on the bird legs.
 

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I'm sure it's a money thing. Costs less to manufacture/purchase "bird legs" than the more robust and sturdy pedestals. I would also believe that more and more people aren't even using the legs any longer as most are wall mounting their TV's:
Other than cost - or in addition - the regular TV stands were the widest part of the package. Without having that stand the package can become slimmer allowing for more cartons to fit into a certain space which in the end will help with freight cost

I was looking at TV’s this holiday season but decided to wait until next year - I never even noticed the bird leg stands. Wouldn’t matter anyway as I love mine being wall mounted. I really took my time with the mounting. I am always in my chair (recliner) with my feet up. I laid my head back in a most comfortable position and make a mark on the wall where my eyes naturally looked. That mark was the center line for my mount.

For most of our lives we had English Mastiffs. Our TV was always in a nice cherry corner cabinet ie entertainment center. It was OK unless the dog was walking around or decided to sit between you and the TV. There was a lot of “go lay down!” During TV time. Having the TV up on the wall eliminated that.

My TV is mounted on the wall actually in a corner. Our sitting room is actually quite small so there isn’t a practical way to have another piece of furniture in there. I also took my time to run the cables all together zip tied down the wall corner. A section of wire mold will touch it off just fine.
 

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Both LCDs we have are on the base, but don't even consider that secure enough, very less the bird legs.

Made *L* brackets out of 1/4" aluminum, painted flat black, bolted onto the base and then that bolts
onto the back of the dresser in the bedroom and entertainment center in the living room.

Brackets out of sight and secure, TVs ain't going anywhere.

The one in the kitchen is wall mounted on a swing out and rotatable fixture for the wife's viewing pleasure.
 
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