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I have a 1025 R and currently have a bucket to push snow. I saw previous older threads about the HLA 1500 and wanted to get reviews and thoughts about what is the best snow pusher for the money on a 1025R.
 

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I have one...

Tim,

I went out this year and purchased a HLA 1500 Snow pusher for my 1025R. It's a beautiful setup where you can go right up to your garage door and use the back scraper (top part) feature to drag snow away. All I can say is this thing is built like a brick $hit house.
 

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I bought a 6 ft Express Steel snow pusher and I finally was able to use a few days ago after about 10 inches of powder snow. I have a 1025R and it handled the 6 ft pusher no problem. I believe it weighs about 600 lbs or so. I didn't get the back scraper version but I don't think I'll need it since I can use my box blade for most of the work a backblade would have been used for.
 

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I've had an HLA 1500 for two seasons and can attest to the superior build quality and robust construction. I have the optional back drag blade installed which is extremely useful if you have the need.

You will not be disappointed if you buy an HLA. Those guys up in Canada really know how to make snow moving equipment!
 

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I've had an HLA 1500 for two seasons and can attest to the superior build quality and robust construction. I have the optional back drag blade installed which is extremely useful if you have the need.

You will not be disappointed if you buy an HLA. Those guys up in Canada really know how to make snow moving equipment!
I have never heard a negative point about any product HLA makes for snow. If I didn’t already have my HLA 1000 60” front blade I’d seriously be looking at the snow pusher with backdrag for my 2032r.

Fishbait-any idea what yours weighs?
 

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No direct experience, but these look pretty cool:

Bucket Wings
 

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First time I have seen the backdrag on a snow pusher, very clever idea:thumbup1gif:

Thanks for pics.......
 

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This is my first winter with an HLA1500 66" pusher. It seems like it's going to do great. We've only had a couple of 3-5" snowfalls and the ground hasn't frozen yet. I really like how I can back drag with it.
 

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In post #2 there in the 1st photo is a black pickup. I would think a blade on the front of it would be the “best way” to push snow.
:bigthumb:
 

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Tim,

I went out this year and purchased a HLA 1500 Snow pusher for my 1025R. It's a beautiful setup where you can go right up to your garage door and use the back scraper (top part) feature to drag snow away. All I can say is this thing is built like a brick $hit house.
What size did you get 54",60", 66", or 72"?? I am thinking of the 60 or 66". Thanks.
 

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I just picked up the 60" HLA 1500 snowpusher.

Absolute garbage if you even remotely plan on going from asphalt to gravel.


Me and my dealer are going to have a lively "chat" on Wednesday about this HLA garbage he sold me when he knew exactly what I was planning on doing with it - commercial cleaning of various residential driveways.

Whenever I try to "float" the pusher, all it wants to do is bury those tiny skid shoes in the gravel and push gravel around everywhere. However, I need the cutting edge equal to the same height as the shoes, in case I want to do asphalt driveways. From what I can clearly see, the shoes are WAY too narrow - and at a $1500 take-home price tag, I should NOT have to be modifying it in any way, shape or form.

1 out of 10 for a poorly thought out product. Maybe 2 out of 10 if the backdrag function is of interest to you.
 

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No direct experience, but these look pretty cool:

Bucket Wings
Ken,

For an economical version of the snow pusher, this is probably OK. As a point of clarification, I do NOT plow any gravel surfaces as we don't have any around our area. I tried to be as objective in both the pro's and con's as I could.

From someone who plows A LOT of snow in residential driveways, here is my take on the "bucket wings. I Just plowed for 4 hours again today, another 17 driveways of every shape, size all concrete and asphalt. I have plowed snow for 35 hours already this season. So, I get and have a lot of experience plowing snow, especially in residential driveways in my area.............

While some may have differing opinions, from doing this on a variety of of driveways and dealing with the real world complications, here are my thoughts from my experience of residential driveway plowing over 20 years, using various equipment.

Positives
1. Makes the bucket more of a multi use tool. Buckets alone to plow snow are painfully slow.

2. Adds pushing width that takes the bucket from 50" to 84". This is a huge issue.

3. Gives you "Snow Pushing" capabilities for $500, which is much less than the cost of a dedicated snow pusher, roughly $1,500.

4. Allows you to push snow without being limited to the bucket capacity and having clean up trails everywhere.

5. Permits you to move snow without spending the money for a front quick attach hitch and 54" plow.

6. Gives the snow pusher the advantages of a V Plow and allows you to "scoop" the snow for pushing. However, unlike a V Plow, this is the ONLY way this item on your bucket allows you to push the snow. You can't angle it, etc.

7. Prevents having the $1,500 tied up in a dedicated snow pusher that is used seasonally and can be very weather dependent.

Negatives
1. Eliminates the ability to back drag, which is an essential function in plowing residential driveways (unless you like to hand shovel). Of the 17 residential driveways I plow the ONLY one I don't back drag is my own drive because I designed it and the landscaping for scraping and pushing to the edge in every direction. Other driveways require me to back drag, some of the extensively.

2. If you catch an edge of the bucket on an uneven surface,such as heaved concrete, you are wrecking either the surface, the bucket and maybe yourself. It's going to happen.......it's part of the game of plowing residential driveways.

3. Wet heavy snow will fill the bucket and be harder to "empty" plus stick to the wings, adding a lot of weight.

4. When number 3 happens, You can't tip the front of the bucket down and bang the bucket on the surface to clean it out as the wings are out front and will be bent.

5. Needs a top flap or snow accumulated out front of the unit starts to come over the top of the bucket and eventually the wings. Even in the video, this becomes an issue. With light fluffy snow, it's a reality as the weight of the snow won't stop you before the snow needing additional clean up will.

6. When you are straight pushing everything, you end up with piles all over the place when you reach your pushing limit. You will have to push off the surface and likely into the lawn often at 15 degree angles.

7. When you push onto a lawn, you will likely tear up either the grass or other with the bucket edge. This is a big problem.

8. The bucket edge isn't ideal for scraping the pavement, unless you put some type of rubber or composite "edge" on the bottom of the bucket edge to protect the surface.

9. Changes in contour on the surface, for example transitions from the road to driveways and back due to drain curbing will leave the bucket leading edge very likely to damage the surface and the heights change. Even floating the bucket leaves the sharp leading edge of the bucket very likely to damage either the driveway, the road or in reality, both depending upon the direction of the push.

10. Without being able to trip the snow removal scraping edge, you better wear your seat belt because unforeseen and unplanned stops will be very abrupt.

11. Leaves the bucket with a bunch of holes in when the wings are removed.....

12. Anytime you are going over snow and not scraping it to the surface with a rubber edge or composite edge, you are packing down the snow and making it very likely to become icy. It's the same way the blower does it. Packing down the wet snow over time, it makes the surface very dangerous for walking, etc. Using this approach will require more snow melt be applied since you can't clean the surface completely. This occurs in the video of him pushing snow with the wings. I need to get the surface cleaned or the ice on these driveway grades makes everything much more dangerous than it should be.

Bottom line, I am not a fan of this approach and I can't see the bucket wings working unless you are in the same position as the guy who invented them. You are clearing a driveway and it's not paved and you don't care about cleaning it to the surface. .........................
 

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I just picked up the 60" HLA 1500 snowpusher.

Absolute garbage if you even remotely plan on going from asphalt to gravel.


Me and my dealer are going to have a lively "chat" on Wednesday about this HLA garbage he sold me when he knew exactly what I was planning on doing with it - commercial cleaning of various residential driveways.

Whenever I try to "float" the pusher, all it wants to do is bury those tiny skid shoes in the gravel and push gravel around everywhere. However, I need the cutting edge equal to the same height as the shoes, in case I want to do asphalt driveways. From what I can clearly see, the shoes are WAY too narrow - and at a $1500 take-home price tag, I should NOT have to be modifying it in any way, shape or form.

1 out of 10 for a poorly thought out product. Maybe 2 out of 10 if the backdrag function is of interest to you.
Pretty harsh.

If you are plowing un-frozen gravel you will have this same issue with any snow removal implement. Once frozen it is a non-issue.
 

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I just picked up the 60" HLA 1500 snowpusher.

Absolute garbage if you even remotely plan on going from asphalt to gravel.


Me and my dealer are going to have a lively "chat" on Wednesday about this HLA garbage he sold me when he knew exactly what I was planning on doing with it - commercial cleaning of various residential driveways.

Whenever I try to "float" the pusher, all it wants to do is bury those tiny skid shoes in the gravel and push gravel around everywhere. However, I need the cutting edge equal to the same height as the shoes, in case I want to do asphalt driveways. From what I can clearly see, the shoes are WAY too narrow - and at a $1500 take-home price tag, I should NOT have to be modifying it in any way, shape or form.

1 out of 10 for a poorly thought out product. Maybe 2 out of 10 if the backdrag function is of interest to you.
Pretty harsh.

If you are plowing un-frozen gravel you will have this same issue with any snow removal implement. Once frozen it is a non-issue.
My thoughts exactly. In addition these complaints aren’t really about the capabilities, effectiveness or robustness of the implement, rather the implements intended use vs. expectations for it.

Now I do agree that if you specifically detailed to your dealer the use and expectations you had and they led you to believe that this was the perfect solution then yes, they misrepresented and are at fault for providing you with an implement mis-suited for your expectations and use but that is no fault of the implement itself.

No offense intended, but did you go to the dealer set on this pusher and let them sell it to you or did you go in, open minded and look at all the available options and they steered you to this one?
 
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I just picked up the 60" HLA 1500 snowpusher.

Absolute garbage if you even remotely plan on going from asphalt to gravel.


Me and my dealer are going to have a lively "chat" on Wednesday about this HLA garbage he sold me when he knew exactly what I was planning on doing with it - commercial cleaning of various residential driveways.

Whenever I try to "float" the pusher, all it wants to do is bury those tiny skid shoes in the gravel and push gravel around everywhere. However, I need the cutting edge equal to the same height as the shoes, in case I want to do asphalt driveways. From what I can clearly see, the shoes are WAY too narrow - and at a $1500 take-home price tag, I should NOT have to be modifying it in any way, shape or form.

1 out of 10 for a poorly thought out product. Maybe 2 out of 10 if the backdrag function is of interest to you.
My pusher doesn't have skid shoes but rather the thick rubber edge. I have an area of asphalt and the rest of my driveway is gravel and I am able to get right down to the asphalt and clean it right up, then on the gravel, until it is all frozen, I am keeping the edge slightly elevated so I don't push gravel everywhere. Maybe see if you can get the rubber edge?
 

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I just picked up the 60" HLA 1500 snowpusher.

Absolute garbage if you even remotely plan on going from asphalt to gravel.


Me and my dealer are going to have a lively "chat" on Wednesday about this HLA garbage he sold me when he knew exactly what I was planning on doing with it - commercial cleaning of various residential driveways.

Whenever I try to "float" the pusher, all it wants to do is bury those tiny skid shoes in the gravel and push gravel around everywhere. However, I need the cutting edge equal to the same height as the shoes, in case I want to do asphalt driveways. From what I can clearly see, the shoes are WAY too narrow - and at a $1500 take-home price tag, I should NOT have to be modifying it in any way, shape or form.

1 out of 10 for a poorly thought out product. Maybe 2 out of 10 if the backdrag function is of interest to you.
I don't think you can really blame the design of the snow pusher. You could maybe blame the dealer but if the guy you dealt with has no experience with skid shoes and cutting surfaces on gravel then he probably doesn't know any better. Since a snow pusher relies on the same type of skid shoes and cutting edge as a snow blower, you are experiencing the same issues as snow blower users.

1. A gravel surface and a paved surface will always require a different adjustment of the shoes as for pavement you want the cutting edge very close or touching and for gravel you need to have the cutting edge up off the surface.
2. When working on gravel that is not frozen you cannot use float as the weight of the implement will cause the skids to dig in.

The only real approach I have found is to readjust the skid shoes for the surface to be cleaned. I have two marks on the sides of my snow blower. One for gravel and one for pavement. This allows me to readjust the skids in about 5 minutes. But... I still have to get off the tractor, grab the wrenches from the tool box, and make the change.

It's not ideal but if cleaning both types of surfaces there's not many options.
 
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My pusher doesn't have skid shoes but rather the thick rubber edge.

Instead of adjustable skid shoes does the ends of your pusher just sit on the ground? I have seen some like this although they are not very common. In fact, while searching for a photo I could not find any that did not have some form of skid shoe. There are also some 3PH snow blowers that do not have skids but instead the ends of the housing just rides directly on the ground.

pusher.jpg

From the various pushers I have seen the ones with adjustable shoes offer more versatility and longer life due to the replaceable skids.
 
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Instead of adjustable skid shoes does the ends of your pusher just sit on the ground? I have seen some like this although they are not very common. In fact, while searching for a photo I could not find any that did not have some form of skid shoe. There are also some 3PH snow blowers that do not have skids but instead the ends of the housing just rides directly on the ground.

View attachment 516226

From the various pushers I have seen the ones with adjustable shoes offer more versatility and longer life due to the replaceable skids.
Yep, thats exactly the one I have, except in John Deere green of course, lol, works awesome ! :bigthumb:
 

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Yep, thats exactly the one I have, except in John Deere green of course, lol, works awesome ! :bigthumb:
Oh! Then it DOES have skid shoes. :)
 
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