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I have a 2015 5075e which comes with the factory air pre-heater. From what I have read, this feature works really well in the cold months. Where I live the temps can get down to 0 degrees F so I am wondering if I might need to purchase either a block heater, oil pan heater or water heater? I have never had any trouble starting the tractor when it is really cold out but I would prefer using another form of heat if possible when it gets that cold.

What do you recommend?

Thanks!
 

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i have used a block heater on each of three tractors,,,
EACH time,, the tractor ran MUCH nicer when heated,, as compared to starting cold,,,

So, although not a necessity,, the heater is VERY helpful,,,, :good2:
 

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Block heater really does the job here during Michigan winters,
don’t know why I waited years to install one on my 3038E.:flag_of_truce:
 

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Block Heaters are nice but use around 1200 watts or so of electricity to run. So you don't want to run it all night long just to start the tractor in the morning. Use a Timer to turn it on a hour or so before starting and they still work great even on your vehicles to warm them up. It is nice having the water warm in the engine or more important the oil warm for the bearings unless you use synthetic oil and then it lubricates nice right off the bat. Other then that a switch to start the heater ahead of time during the day is nice also. Don't forget to unplug it leaving! I have never used a block heater on my JD4044M yet in Eastern Washington Okanogan Area using the Key Operated Pre/heater but did need it on my old gas engine tractors. My old School Bus would blow black smoke and run on one or two cylinders for quite a while if I did not plug it in. Forgot a few times and almost did not get it started!!! Some Diesel are different when it comes to cold starting with out a heater.
 

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My 2030 came with a block coolant heater. About 30 minutes is all it takes. :bigthumb::greentractorride:
 

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heater

i have used a block heater on each of three tractors,,,
EACH time,, the tractor ran MUCH nicer when heated,, as compared to starting cold,,,

So, although not a necessity,, the heater is VERY helpful,,,, :good2:
I put block heaters on my 332 and 455s and they like it !!
when using them in the winter they start with little to no smoke and run smoother at start which has to be easier on the engine .
 

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My vote goes block heater. It makes an enormous difference in cold starting. Personally, I plug it in for half an hour or so if the temp gets to 30 degrees, 1-2 hours for anything below 20. Highly recommend.
 

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Agree with using a block heater whenever the temps dip below freezing. Only need to plug it in for a couple of hours, and the difference it makes in starting is huge. Especially at 20 or 30 below freezing (ie. -20 to -30 Celsius). I have block heaters on both tractors. If I'm planning to plow mid-day, my wife will plug in the heater when she does the morning feed on her horses.

And for keeping the battery charged each tractor is on a CTEK charger (the Polar model with wires that stay flexible in the cold):
Amazon.com: CTEK (56-958) MUS 4.3 POLAR 12 Volt Fully Automatic Extreme Climate 8 Step Battery Charger: Automotive

Finally, after 4 years out here we now have a functioning storage shed with LED overhead lighting and plenty of electrical outlets. The shed is unheated, but my tractors are out of the wind and snow - much easier to work on and around them. (The long yellow cable hanging along the wall at left is 100 feet of worksite LED strings that I ran off an extension cord from another building until we got the shed wired and overhead lights installed this summer.)



==Grizzler
 

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I have a block heater on everything.
@JD4044M... not all of them draw that much. The one on the small JD tractors like my x748 and gator draw around 400 watts
I believe my 4720’s is around 600 watts, and that should be close to what would go on your tractor. Still the costs add up if you use them carelessly. I usually only use them when temps start to drop below zero.
They sure make a difference on how much your engine complains on cold startup.
I also am a huge fan of synthetic oil which helps too.
 

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Heating a tractor? Only if the fuel gels. Other then that, engines are in working range before hydraulic fluid is ready for use.

At 25F it took 3 minutes before the steering on my x475 smoothed out. Steering has the best feedback, but I exercise everything but the hydrostatic drive until the steering loosens up.

My 140 without power steering took about 15 minutes at -20 to loosen up. I think it was the hydrostatic lever that let me know it was warming along with the noise, but it might have been the blade and hydro controls.
 

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Heating a tractor? Only if the fuel gels. Other then that, engines are in working range before hydraulic fluid is ready for use.

At 25F it took 3 minutes before the steering on my x475 smoothed out. Steering has the best feedback, but I exercise everything but the hydrostatic drive until the steering loosens up.

My 140 without power steering took about 15 minutes at -20 to loosen up. I think it was the hydrostatic lever that let me know it was warming along with the noise, but it might have been the blade and hydro controls.
I agree. I’ve never had a heater in any of my diesels and never had an issue. But I guess I might be in a milder area - it only occasionally gets to -20*. Teens are more common.

And I also excersice the hydraulics to warm them up before moving.
 

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Heating a tractor? Only if the fuel gels. Other then that, engines are in working range before hydraulic fluid is ready for use.

At 25F it took 3 minutes before the steering on my x475 smoothed out. Steering has the best feedback, but I exercise everything but the hydrostatic drive until the steering loosens up.

My 140 without power steering took about 15 minutes at -20 to loosen up. I think it was the hydrostatic lever that let me know it was warming along with the noise, but it might have been the blade and hydro controls.
That's why I use both a block heater and a transmission oil heater. I also use an oil pan magnetic heater for when it's really cold so that there is less damage from lack of oil flow in those first few seconds.
 

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That's why I use both a block heater and a transmission oil heater. I also use an oil pan magnetic heater for when it's really cold so that there is less damage from lack of oil flow in those first few seconds.
Unless you also drain the filters and pumps after use I don’t see that making a difference. Any oil not in the reservoir is still cold, and still must move out of the way for the warmed oil to make it to critical parts.

Plus these are mostly designed for Dino oil. A synthetic at -20 is much thinner then Dino oil at zero degrees.

In all my life gelled fuel has been the only thing that’s has caused problems, and I’ve seen heat pads cause fires for others.
 

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Unless you also drain the filters and pumps after use I don’t see that making a difference. Any oil not in the reservoir is still cold, and still must move out of the way for the warmed oil to make it to critical parts.

Plus these are mostly designed for Dino oil. A synthetic at -20 is much thinner then Dino oil at zero degrees.

In all my life gelled fuel has been the only thing that’s has caused problems, and I’ve seen heat pads cause fires for others.
Synthetic oil is your friend!
If I plug my 4720 in overnight, the oil filter, oil pan, and entire block will be warm to the touch...doesn’t do much for the tranny though. Low vis Hygard flows pretty good at -20, but I make sure to run at about 1500 rpm for a good 20 minutes before I start moving things. The tranny oil never really warms up though...75-80 deg is about as warm as it gets.
My skid loader hyd oil will warm up to 125 deg though. It has a hydraulic fan that is variable speed based on temp.
I like a block heater, just because you pretty much are guaranteed a smooth rapid start without allot of swearing.
 

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Unless you also drain the filters and pumps after use I don’t see that making a difference. Any oil not in the reservoir is still cold, and still must move out of the way for the warmed oil to make it to critical parts.

Plus these are mostly designed for Dino oil. A synthetic at -20 is much thinner then Dino oil at zero degrees.

In all my life gelled fuel has been the only thing that’s has caused problems, and I’ve seen heat pads cause fires for others.
Assuming you're talking about the magnetic pan heater, I plan to stop using it after the first oil change. I doubt Deere uses synthetic oil for their "break-in oil," but it's the only thing I use.

The transmission oil heater though...I think that's a great thing and I can't believe I've gone years without one.
 

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Synthetic oil for sure!:thumbup1gif: When I bought my 2520, dealer threw in :thumbup1gif: a block heater. I used it once in 8 years.
 

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I have the radiator hose heater on the 955 and the hydraulic transaxle heater, and plug them in before I go out to use the tractor, which sleeps outside. Easy start up for the motor and hydraulic system!

I will be adding a transaxle heating pad on the 420 as soon as it warms up. It used to sleep in an unheated shed, buut it now sleeps outside at my son's house, and am concerned about the cold start-ups.

Dave
 
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