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I just got a 1947 John Deere mod. A tractor and want to change the oil , trans oil and rear end oil and want to make sure I use the right wt. I found that the motor oil is 40 wt. but cant find what kind of oil is used in the trans and rear end . Can anybody help me?
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:wgtt:

The trans and rear end share the same fluid. The first reduction gear (right side of the tractor behind the clutch) also shares the same fluid, but it must be filled and drained separately. I plan on using 80/90 gear oil in my 60.
 

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Welcome from West Virginia


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I remember reading operators manuals on that vintage tractor decades ago and remembering 140 weight oil was recommended for the transmission & final drives in high temps, over 100 degrees F. But for 99+% of the way those tractors are used today, 80W-90 like Jason recommends is fine.

If you plan to use the tractor in winter, cold temps, below freezing or below zero F, even thinner oil would be wise. Those old tractors relied heavily on splash lubrication, and believe me, at zero degrees F, 90 weight oil is not splashing around.
 

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For the engine, consult a manual. There will be different straight grades of oil depending on temperature. Modern multi-grades can be used over a wider range but they should still reflect the chart in your manual. Make sure you use a oil rated for flat-tappet valves such as what is recommended for diesel truck engines. Shell Rotella 10w-30 or 15w-40 are what I have run in all of my 2-cylinder Deere's during the winter and summer respectively. If you are a little cheap like me, you can save some of your used oil to fill your air cleaner cup!

In the trans and final drives I like to use a marine-grade 75w-90. Marine gear oil is formulated to resist water contamination and with as much as these huge castings can sweat, I figure it certainly can't hurt.

Just as important as all that other stuff, find all the grease zerks and fill them too! These old machines are like a good duck dog; happiest when thoroughly moist.

Welcome and have fun! :greentractorride:
 

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Double check in the manual, so I don't mis-lead anyone, but I believe the "A" first reduction gear cover gets the same oil as the engine crankcase, not transmission gear oil. The "B" model manual covers this well.
IIRC the older letter models had a drain hole but no filler hole in the first reduction gear cover. Old oil could be drained from the cover, but the clutch brake shift fork housing was removed to add a specific volume of oil. Excess oil drains thru to the crankcase. Later models had a filler hole at the top of the casting for refill.
On this 1950 "B", the FRC filler plug, with the square head, is just behind the crankcase filler pipe.

The number series (60) may be different due to the extra gearing for live power. They might share oil with the tranny/differential, I don't know. Don't have any manuals for them, so if someone who does could enlighten me, it would be appreciated.

Mag timed.JPG

tommyhawk
 
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