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Discussion Starter #1
What rpms are you guys running when you doing work? It goes up to 3500 on my 1025r.
1-Is it ok to run 3500 all day? Or just just when doing heavy work?
2-what do you usually run at in general?
3-when do you use low & high speed
4-when do you use 4wd?
5-when do you lock the wheels
6-and anything else I'm not thinking about
 

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1. You can run wide open all day every day if needed, they were made for it.
2. Run it where needed. PTO equip, run at PTO speed. Other work, run as necessary to complete the task at hand.
3. High for road travel, low for work.
4. Use 4wd as needed with poor traction, hills ground engaging equipment. Not on pavement or concrete.
5. Diff lock when 4wd isn't enough
6. Use what you need to get the job done, and enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
1. You can run wide open all day every day if needed, they were made for it.
2. Run it where needed. PTO equip, run at PTO speed. Other work, run as necessary to complete the task at hand.
3. High for road travel, low for work.
4. Use 4wd as needed with poor traction, hills ground engaging equipment. Not on pavement or concrete.
5. Diff lock when 4wd isn't enough
6. Use what you need to get the job done, and enjoy!
Awesome. Hoping that was the answers.
I been sticking around the 2200 most the time and then kick it up moving heavy stuff
 

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What rpms are you guys running when you doing work? It goes up to 3500 on my 1025r.
1-Is it ok to run 3500 all day? Or just just when doing heavy work?
2-what do you usually run at in general?
3-when do you use low & high speed
4-when do you use 4wd?
5-when do you lock the wheels
6-and anything else I'm not thinking about
I'm in FWD most of the time I'm doing work because most of my property is slooped, the FWD gives you 4wheel braking which makes it much safer on hills.
 

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I'm in FWD most of the time I'm doing work because most of my property is slooped, the FWD gives you 4wheel braking which makes it much safer on hills.
How does running in FWD give you 4wheel braking?
 
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How does running in FWD give you 4wheel braking?
The front and rear wheels are "locked" together when in FWD, so the effect of braking the rear wheels also transfer to the front-as long as the front wheel have traction.
 

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The front and rear wheels are "locked" together when in FWD, so the effect of braking the rear wheels also transfer to the front-as long as the front wheel have traction.
Otherwise tractors only have brakes on the rear axle. Locking in the front differential will allow that axle to help stop you. Same as it helps pull you out of a low traction situation.
 

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Plus being in Fwd allows the front wheels to be locked in when you set the parking brake. Piece of mind when on slopes or crawling under your machine.
 
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What rpms are you guys running when you doing work? It goes up to 3500 on my 1025r.
1-Is it ok to run 3500 all day? Or just just when doing heavy work?
2-what do you usually run at in general?
3-when do you use low & high speed
4-when do you use 4wd?
5-when do you lock the wheels
6-and anything else I'm not thinking about
I'll say this, a diesel is designed to run at PTO speed all day but use it and just learn. Mowing for instance I run about 2500, you can run wide open but if not totally necessary all you are really doing is burning fuel. Low range when working tractor, high range for travel.


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The front and rear wheels are "locked" together when in FWD, so the effect of braking the rear wheels also transfer to the front-as long as the front wheel have traction.
That's what I thought, as I knew the front wheels do not have brakes as stated, at least mine does not.
 

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I been sticking around the 2200 most the time and then kick it up moving heavy stuff
Just an FYI raising the engine RPM does nothing for lift or pulling capacity, these are controlled by the pressure relief valve. Raising the RPM will increase the flow rate so every thing will move faster. Work at the speed you are most comfortable especially when lifting or moving heavy objects.
 

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I usually run somewhere around 2400-2500 for most tasks. I usually only run higher when operating PTO

I use low gear most of the time. Only use high gear when unloaded & on flat ground which is rare on my place...

I use 4wd as needed only. If I spin, I lock er in.

Have only had to lock a couple times when I was in some much...

Like most things, I don't believe there's an answer that fits everyone. I think it all depends on your particular situation, tasks at hand, layout of land, etc... After experimenting some, you'll get a feel for your machine, & what you're comfortable with.
 
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Plus being in Fwd allows the front wheels to be locked in when you set the parking brake. Piece of mind when on slopes or crawling under your machine.
Not real sure on this one? How does the parking brake have anything to do with the front wheels? Or, are you talking about the parking brake being set, having the transmission in high or low range while the fwd is engaged, thus having the front wheels help with parking since they are engaged with the rear wheels via the transmission being in gear? If this is true, once you put transmission in neutral, the front wheels will have no effect via parking brake. :confused:
 

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What rpms are you guys running when you doing work? It goes up to 3500 on my 1025r.
1-Is it ok to run 3500 all day? Or just just when doing heavy work? I run mine wide open almost all the time. When using backhoe, I run it at around 2200rpm
2-what do you usually run at in general?see above
3-when do you use low & high speed I am always in low, only use high gear when going down the road. It is way too bumpy to use high around the yard
4-when do you use 4wd? Not very often, Only when wheels slip or if I am concerned about a steep hill.
5-when do you lock the wheels Only when I can't get traction when doing a task. Not used oftern
6-and anything else I'm not thinking about
 

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Per the manual when using the front or rear PTO



Set engine speed to 1500 rpm or less.




Move the PTO control lever (A) to desired operating position.

Position (B) - Mid PTO only.
Position (C) - Mid and Rear PTO
Position (D) - Rear PTO only.



Pull PTO/RIO switch knob up to the engaged/on position.

Adjust the hand throttle lever forward to the desired speed for the implement used.

NOTE: The LCD indicates the PTO speed at an engine speed of 3200 rpm.
At 3200 engine rpm the mid PTO speed will be 2100 rpm and rear PTO speed will be 540 rpm, as indicated on the LCD.
If PTO shuts off during use, turn off engine and push down to turn off PTO/RIO switch. Lock park brake. Allow engine to cool. Check coolant level and add coolant if necessary. Clean debris away from radiator cooling fins. Sit on seat, and start engine. Pull PTO/RIO switch up to the on position. If PTO still does not engage, see your local John Deere Dealer for service.
 
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The Hobbs meter is based on RPM - The more RPMs you run the faster the clock ticks.
 

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Not real sure on this one? How does the parking brake have anything to do with the front wheels? Or, are you talking about the parking brake being set, having the transmission in high or low range while the fwd is engaged, thus having the front wheels help with parking since they are engaged with the rear wheels via the transmission being in gear? If this is true, once you put transmission in neutral, the front wheels will have no effect via parking brake. :confused:
When you are in 4wd the front and rear axles are locked in sync so if one turns so does the other. The same is true if one isn't turning, the other one shouldn't be either. If it is, you aren't in 4wd or something is broken. Setting the parking brake locks the rear axles from turning therefore the front axle is also prevented from turning regardless of the transmission selector lever. The two axles are tied by the locked transfer case.
 

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When you are in 4wd the front and rear axles are locked in sync so if one turns so does the other. The same is true if one isn't turning, the other one shouldn't be either. If it is, you aren't in 4wd or something is broken. Setting the parking brake locks the rear axles from turning therefore the front axle is also prevented from turning regardless of the transmission selector lever. The two axles are tied by the locked transfer case.
Your Tractor has a wet brake located in the transmission. It's like a clutch pack with multiple discs. When you step on the brake the pack compresses the friction material against the discs acting as a brake. So the rear wheels are effectively braked but until you hook up the front axle via engaging 4wd the front is just spinning freely.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Just an FYI raising the engine RPM does nothing for lift or pulling capacity, these are controlled by the pressure relief valve. Raising the RPM will increase the flow rate so every thing will move faster. Work at the speed you are most comfortable especially when lifting or moving heavy objects.
Ok. So the knob under the seat gives power to the FEL, backhoe, etc?
Rpms-to move around faster, and work FEL, etc faster?
What gives more power to the wheels to push stuff around?
 
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