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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Finally, the pistons came loose on the model 70. Since October of last year, the cylinders have been soaking in a cocktail of penetrating oils. Still could not budge the flyweel, so I knew that another method needed to be used to get things freed up. I did notice that the level of penetrating oil in the left cylinder had dropped, so I topped it off again.

After a whole lot of brain storming and praying, I backed the tractor up to a large tree and hooked up a large chain to the tree. Then I attached the cable of a come along to a smaller chain which was looped through the hole in the flywheel that was in the highest postion. Made sure to wrap the cable in a clockwise direction, which would move the pistons in the opposite direction of travel. The spark plugs were removed and the rocker arms/push rods were loosened. Also, I chocked the wheels to keep the tractor from rolling backwards when tension was applied to the chain and come along.

After a couple of days, the flywheel still wouldn't budge. So, I got the tallest pair of truck ramps I had and rolled the front wheels up on them. This elevated the front of the tractor and caused the liquid in the cylinders to bathe more of the top area of the pistons. Also, this made it possible to add more penetrant to the cylinders, but I was low on that and used diesel instead. Early this morning I added a little more tension to the come along and the flywheel began to turn.

After so much hard work, I had trouble believing what I was seeing. I then released the tension on the come along and routed the cable in a counterclockwise fashion and applied tension once again. After several minutes of this, the pistons were able to reach TDC. I then was able to rotate the flywheel by hand. Have definitely been praising God for helping me.

I decided to drain the oil and noticed there was about a quart of water in the bottom. So, I will be pulling the head to replace the gasket and give everything a thorough inspection.

Just so thankful to have that engine freed up.
 

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Great news.


Glad to hear you've decided to pull the head too to find out what you've got going on.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, it was kind of alarming to see water in the oil, but sure wasn't going to let that steal my joy. I'm hoping it was just a leaky head gasket that caused that.

The story I was told was that when it was last run by the owner's relative, he had traveled down the gravel farm to market road a short distance and noticed an external coolant leak. Immediately he turned around and parked it back in the barn. It sat there for 20 years until last year when I bought it.
 

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Way to go green and red man, A lot of people would have given up.
 

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Good work. You have much more patience than I do.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Boy Howdy, I sure would've regretted it if I had tried to go ahead and cut corners on the engine.
Just have several projects that need attention and had wrongly entertained the idea that I was somehow going to get by without pulling the head.

Today, I started preparing to pull the head, which is a slow process. At least it was for me, because I was trying my best to avoid breaking any bolts on the exhaust manifold. Ended up twisting one in two and it wasn't because I rushed it. Had already been soaking the bolts as best I could with penetrating oil several days in advance. No worries, just one broken bolt isn't any big deal to have to drill out.

For anyone that is dealing with a stuck 2 cylinder engine, chances are that yours might be similar to my 70. The pistons were just as I had pictured. The majority of the rust and area that was seized up on the pistons was mainly at or near the top of each one. As I pulled the head forward on the studs, something that reminded me of a different kind of chili came oozing out the bottom.:laugh:

Don't know how well you can see in the pics, but it is pretty yucky looking.

Looks like I don't have a choice, but to hone the cylinders out too. Was hoping to avoid spending as much $$$ on this project, but at least after I get everything in order, it should run pretty good for a long time. Still trying to figure out exactly how the water got in the oil. The copper head gasket appears to be in pretty good shape, but I"ll take a closer look at it.
 

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Without a dought pulling the head was the best move. Hopefully the bottom end is in better condition.


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Discussion Starter #11
Was this guy parked with nothing covering the exhaust for a while?

That would explain the water in the bottom of the oil and how bad stuff looks.......:empathy3:
No, it was kept inside a barn. From what I could tell, the barn roof didn't appear to leak. Maybe if they would've put a can over the exhaust any way, things would've been different. Still scratching my head on this one. Praying there aren't any cracks in the head or block.
 

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Was this guy parked with nothing covering the exhaust for a while?

That would explain the water in the bottom of the oil and how bad stuff looks.......:empathy3:
That's what I was thinking, pretty common when these tractors sit outside for a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The mystery continues as to how the water got in the oil on the 70. Haven't had time to take the head and cylinder to the machine shop yet. I had a chance to ask the seller of the tractor again about if the tractor had ever been stored outside since it was last parked in the barn about 20 years ago.
She said it was never left outside and the barn roof doesn't leak.

Think I should've saved the engine oil that was drained out so it could be tested for antifreeze contamination. Just have too much going on at the moment and it's easy to overlook things.
 

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Don't sweat it. The machine shop will tell all.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You're exactly right.:) At least this particular machine shop is known for being good at repairing engine blocks and heads should these be worth repairing if I get bad news.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Have been meaning to measure the diameter of the pistons and bore to confirm what size rings wiil be needed if the pistons are worth reusing. Since this was tractor was converted to propane, I wasn't sure what all parts were swapped. Today I got word from someone more familiar with the history of this particular 70 that reinforces what I suspected. One guy said that he thinks that the block on this tractor is/was a power block. He isn't 100% sure, but knows that there used to be one on it.
 
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