Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here's my situation. I have a plan for a small main tractor barn with two add on side sheds. The main barn area is 18'x24'feet. Along side of the main there will be a 12'wide x 24' long add on shed on either side. The sheds will be full enclosed & have a shed roof from the main building to the exterior wall of the shed. So, inside the barn this gives me a nice open area of 24' x 42 feet in total space. Am I making sense so far.

Now, I have a set of plans for this which was drawn up by a licensed architect. His plan calls for 6"x6" posts set six feet apart. Except for the gable wall end openings where the posts are set to accommodate a 10' door opening. It makes sense so far.

Now I go & look up the 2012 IRC codes. Code R106 states that posts can span no greater than 8'feet apart. The code gives no other information for this restriction.

Here's the problem: On the main building, I would like to span 12' apart on the 24 foot dimension. This would let me build with only on center post on either side of the 24foot run. That gives me a nice open space for work & tractor moving. But since I see the code stops at 8 feet, I do not want to get into trouble with the inspector. I have a permit to build. I've already had my post footing inspection done & because there will be no CO issued, I need only one more inspection which will be framing when structure is in the dry.

I am anticipating I could have a code problem? I've asked all sorts of people out here, from architects, to professors at Clemson University. No one will give me a straight forward answer & the reason is probably one of liability. Yes I could build this thing on 8 foot spans & just drive more carefully.

My last resort. I hate to get involved with the building dept., but I sent an email to the Building Dept. mgr. & asked the span limitation question in general terms. I don't think I will get an answer, or I might be told to come in for a plan review, which I get to pay for & maybe get told I can't go over 8 feet.

If I can have a post & beam wall with a clear opening in it for a 10 foot wide slider door, then why can't I have a 12 foot span inside the building. Makes no sense at all. Sometimes these codes are written in a way that appear to be in conflict with the general thinking behind it. And lastly, if I do use a 12 foot span & the building fails the final framing inspection, does it really matter to me. I'm not asking for a CO even though my tractor will be sleeping in there.:mocking: How does failing the inspection affect me or the status of my property? Has anyone any information on that situation.

If you care to comment, I'm listening. Now don't go poking fun at me here. I'm old, I'm tired & I want to get this barn up before I hit 90.
:banghead::gizmo:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,432 Posts
just use a bigger posts?

glad to see you back, btw:good2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
The gable end wall where your door opening is theoretically has no load in it as your trusses or shed roof rafters are carrying the roof load over it and transferring that tributary load to the wall ( posts and header). In order to make sure you can carry the truss load on what I will call the interior wall your architect should check the header design to accommodate the 12' post spacing to be on the safe side. With that info not knowing your location, either submit for a permit modification or have the "redesign" available when you get your framing inspection when he asks where the other half of your posts are you are armed with the proper "stamped" documentation.

Note that by spreading that load further it may require a more robust footer under those interior posts and some bracing from the header to the post to resist torsional rotation... All depending on your snow / wind loads.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,042 Posts
Here's my situation. I have a plan for a small main tractor barn with two add on side sheds. The main barn area is 18'x24'feet. Along side of the main there will be a 12'wide x 24' long add on shed on either side. The sheds will be full enclosed & have a shed roof from the main building to the exterior wall of the shed. So, inside the barn this gives me a nice open area of 24' x 42 feet in total space. Am I making sense so far.

Now, I have a set of plans for this which was drawn up by a licensed architect. His plan calls for 6"x6" posts set six feet apart. Except for the gable wall end openings where the posts are set to accommodate a 10' door opening. It makes sense so far.

Now I go & look up the 2012 IRC codes. Code R106 states that posts can span no greater than 8'feet apart. The code gives no other information for this restriction.

Here's the problem: On the main building, I would like to span 12' apart on the 24 foot dimension. This would let me build with only on center post on either side of the 24foot run. That gives me a nice open space for work & tractor moving. But since I see the code stops at 8 feet, I do not want to get into trouble with the inspector. I have a permit to build. I've already had my post footing inspection done & because there will be no CO issued, I need only one more inspection which will be framing when structure is in the dry.

I am anticipating I could have a code problem? I've asked all sorts of people out here, from architects, to professors at Clemson University. No one will give me a straight forward answer & the reason is probably one of liability. Yes I could build this thing on 8 foot spans & just drive more carefully.

My last resort. I hate to get involved with the building dept., but I sent an email to the Building Dept. mgr. & asked the span limitation question in general terms. I don't think I will get an answer, or I might be told to come in for a plan review, which I get to pay for & maybe get told I can't go over 8 feet.

If I can have a post & beam wall with a clear opening in it for a 10 foot wide slider door, then why can't I have a 12 foot span inside the building. Makes no sense at all. Sometimes these codes are written in a way that appear to be in conflict with the general thinking behind it. And lastly, if I do use a 12 foot span & the building fails the final framing inspection, does it really matter to me. I'm not asking for a CO even though my tractor will be sleeping in there.:mocking: How does failing the inspection affect me or the status of my property? Has anyone any information on that situation.

If you care to comment, I'm listening. Now don't go poking fun at me here. I'm old, I'm tired & I want to get this barn up before I hit 90.
:banghead::gizmo:
That span you want inside, is there a beam above? What is attached to the tops of the 6X6 posts? I can help you if you answer the question.. I just don't understand what may be above the span.. By the way a gable end has no bearing weight, the rafter thrust is on the other two sides. I will say this; any registered architect can design anything within his or her principle and stamp the plan, most inspectors including myself would accept that stamp. Going into the IRC if you are not familiar with the tables etc. can be very confusing unless you use it regularly. Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
Boy. At first I read this and had a real long response written up with backing facts basically saying "go for it".

After re-reading I think I misunderstood the intent need to change my position.

If you are talking about removing 2 of the posts on the 24 foot dimension to only have the two end posts and one in the center then you need to have the building redesigned. Like John said it will need bigger posts... and bigger beams etc. This would also require different footings.

I hate to say it, but I'd build it as designed, or have it redesigned and redo your posts and footings if you want it to last.


I see some of our resident experts have posted above.... Both of them are right and will be of great help.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Now I go & look up the 2012 IRC codes. Code R106 states that posts can span no greater than 8'feet apart. The code gives no other information for this restriction.

Hmmm... Section R106 of the 2012 IRC covers submission of planning/engineering documents and doesn't mention anything about posts or spans.

The IRC is for 1- and 2-story residential buildings. You are building a barn, no? Does SC apply the same standards for a barn as it does for occupied dwellings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
just use a bigger posts?

glad to see you back, btw:good2:
Thank you! I've been around but mostly reading threads & lurking. I've been wrestling with my storage barn project & the veggie garden.

Bigger post could possibly be an answer, but it's really not about the posts. It is a function of what you use between the posts as top girders. The lumber you put across the span like 2 x 10's or 2 x 12's doubled, etc. & how you actually attach them to the posts is generally the make or break deal. Problem I think is if you exceed a building code, it's not an issue as long as you can prove what your doing is safe & that proof must be done with building calculations & design criteria, none of which I can do. If you give me the plans, I can build it. I just can't engineer it. Thanks for replying. Appreciate it.

P.S. I've stayed off the political forum for some time now. I'm saving money on blood pressure meds.:lolol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The gable end wall where your door opening is theoretically has no load in it as your trusses or shed roof rafters are carrying the roof load over it and transferring that tributary load to the wall ( posts and header). In order to make sure you can carry the truss load on what I will call the interior wall your architect should check the header design to accommodate the 12' post spacing to be on the safe side. With that info not knowing your location, either submit for a permit modification or have the "redesign" available when you get your framing inspection when he asks where the other half of your posts are you are armed with the proper "stamped" documentation.

Note that by spreading that load further it may require a more robust footer under those interior posts and some bracing from the header to the post to resist torsional rotation... All depending on your snow / wind loads.
Yes Sir. I started thinking about the gable ends AFTER I posted my thread. Came to the same conclusion. Gable end has no load in theory, or a lot less load than the other walls.

Your second point- I purchased these plans from an architect. I've contacted him & he had to back off because, it would take a re calculation & possible redesign of joists, girder sizes, etc. And since the plans only cost me about $40. bucks, I don't think he has the incentive to do it. I'm in South Carolina. A major snow event where I am, could possibly happen. But if it does it would be on the night of February 6th @ 3 a.m. & unload a full 1 inch which would be a blizzard but it would be off the roof & gone by 10 a.m.
:lolol:

I'm currently trying to find out what the building dept. actually need from me, if anything regarding this build. I really don't know how fussy they will be out here in the sticks. The closest county inspector is 35 mile away. And what's funny is that the inspector that approved my footings was sent in here from the neighboring county which is even further out. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,432 Posts
P.S. I've stayed off the political forum for some time now. I'm saving money on blood pressure meds.:lolol:
Yeah i'm staying off as well. Seems like it helps everyone!:lol:
 

·
Official "Groovie" Dude
Joined
·
5,663 Posts
Since you already had your footing inspection, where were your footings placed, 6 foot or 12 foot?

I'm guessing a span of 12 foot will probably require larger footings, larger posts, and LVL's to support the load.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
That span you want inside, is there a beam above? What is attached to the tops of the 6X6 posts? I can help you if you answer the question.. I just don't understand what may be above the span.. By the way a gable end has no bearing weight, the rafter thrust is on the other two sides. I will say this; any registered architect can design anything within his or her principle and stamp the plan, most inspectors including myself would accept that stamp. Going into the IRC if you are not familiar with the tables etc. can be very confusing unless you use it regularly. Jeff
Jeff- I will try to answer the question here. But what I may be able to do is send you an attachment of a sketch which may help. But first let me answer here.

Think of it as a barn with three sections. The main is 18 x 24 foot. Then we have to side sheds on either side which are 12 x 24 foot each. Between the three structures there are no interior walls. The only walls are the Gable end walls & the outside shed walls. Those outside shed walls are built on THREE 6"x6" posts that are currently spaced by the plan at 12 foot span. So that gives me the two corner posts & the one post in the middle of the wall. The architect has stated that the shed structure can carry a "Ground/Snow load of 90 psi.

Now we come to the main barn area of 18'x24'. The 18 foot dimension which are the Gable end posts are no problem at all. It's the posts for the 24 foot run. The architect's original plan calls for posts @ 6 foot apart. But keep in mind he is selling a plan that is designed to work 99% in the lower 48 states & maybe Russia too? What I wanted to do is use the same post spans on the main 24foot structure as was used on the shed walls. This would give me a nice open space with only one center span post on either side of the main building. There are NO walls between the main building & the shed buildings. So I have a nice open full area of 24 x 42 feet when all is said & done.

So what's on top of the 6x6 posts. Well at the perimeter of the top main bldg. posts will be double 2'10's notched & bolted to the posts on one side of the post & on the other side would be a double 2x10 as well which would be needed for the interior joist runs, storage floor, etc. Sitting on top of the perimeter girder edge are the 2x 8's capping off the posts & girders, that would be the roof plate or rafter birds mouth plate which would be built up from the double 2 x 8.

I did consult with the architect. He could not tell me if a 12 foot span on the main bldg. was a problem without going back & reworking load calculations, etc. He also expressed concern that at a twelve foot span, I might be concentrating too much weight under the supporting column regarding the ground conditions.

Sorry- back to your question. What's on top of the posts is the roof rafters for a gable roof. If the architect has stated that the shed end walls with 3 posts, can carry 90 psi but he is not sure about the three posts in the the main bldg. it must be due to the weight of the gable roof?

Here are the issues with the code. My footing holes have been approved. No questions were asked about what I was building or how. No discussion about post spacing. Then on my own I looked up the code for Post & beam buildings. Don't ask me why I did that. I guess I like to stay up late working on problems. Anyway 2012, IRC code R106 Titled "Post and Frame Structures"States in its requirements as #1-Residential accessory structure., #8 Max. post spacing of 8 feet. Then it goes on to another code R301 & I'm lost. I tried to find lumber span tables to give me some help but I can't make out what they are telling me.

So if the code says 8 foot limit & I do 12, how do I get around the issue with the build official. Also in this thread another member has commented that there is no R106 code & I may be confusing it with something else which has no bearing on what I am building. However I do have in front of me 6 pages of code Titled as above on the subject.

My post holes- I'm down 3 feet & poured in a reinforced concrete pad 4' thick to set the posts on & then back fill with more concrete. The hole diameter is 12 inches. Inspector looked at it & said ok to it. But the architect made me think my holes(no pun intended) are not good enough. I kind of disagree with that because its not the depth of the hole as much as it is with the support ability & weight dispersal through the pad at the bottom of the hole.

I sent an email to my build dept. mgr., trying to ask around this situation for an answer without being specific. I doubt I will hear back, & if the other member's post here is correct about my mixing up code requirements this might be just a learning exercise. I'm eager to order my lumber before we hit 95 degree days down here in the sunny steam bath south, but I really can't get a lumber list going without an answer to the post question. Any help at all would be appreciated. Any clarification you need let me know. Maybe you could look into the code thing. Maybe I have that wrong as our fellow member has suggested. Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Since you already had your footing inspection, where were your footings placed, 6 foot or 12 foot?

I'm guessing a span of 12 foot will probably require larger footings, larger posts, and LVL's to support the load.
They were inspected at the 12 foot span. Nothing was said by the inspector except for me to confirm to him I was down 3 feet. He said nothing about the 12 inch diameter. And all he asked was what size post & I told him 6x6. End of inspection. Thanks for asking. Makes me wonder about inspections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hmmm... Section R106 of the 2012 IRC covers submission of planning/engineering documents and doesn't mention anything about posts or spans.

The IRC is for 1- and 2-story residential buildings. You are building a barn, no? Does SC apply the same standards for a barn as it does for occupied dwellings?
As I type this, in front of me I have six pages titled "Post & Frame Structure" Point #1 & #8 ref. Residential accessory bldgs. & 8 foot spans. Now, maybe I am misreading something here within the code. But that still leaves me with the 8 foot span limitation. My access to code info is very limited. I'm trying to get confirmation of this span stuff. Its really holding up my project. I can build this stuff, but I can't engineer it, so I'm not going to second guess the pros out there or the authorities. I will take all the help I can get. Thanks for pointing this out. I will have to try to find out what I'm looing at.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Here are the issues with the code. My footing holes have been approved. No questions were asked about what I was building or how. No discussion about post spacing. Then on my own I looked up the code for Post & beam buildings. Don't ask me why I did that. I guess I like to stay up late working on problems. Anyway 2012, IRC code R106 Titled "Post and Frame Structures"States in its requirements as #1-Residential accessory structure., #8 Max. post spacing of 8 feet. Then it goes on to another code R301 & I'm lost. I tried to find lumber span tables to give me some help but I can't make out what they are telling me.

So if the code says 8 foot limit & I do 12, how do I get around the issue with the build official. Also in this thread another member has commented that there is no R106 code & I may be confusing it with something else which has no bearing on what I am building. However I do have in front of me 6 pages of code Titled as above on the subject.

Is this the 6-page document you are referring to?
 

·
Official "Groovie" Dude
Joined
·
5,663 Posts
If I'm understanding your building description, you have a 18x24 main building with two 12x24 fully enclosed lean to's attached to the main structure. Am I drawing a correct assumption? If so keep in mind the 12x24 additions will place some its roof load onto the sidewalls of the 18x24 structure. If I'm close, I doubt a single post will be enough
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,177 Posts
I am not an engineer....but if you really want the 12' spacing, I would look into beefing up the beam and posts and then using a diagonal knee brace that extends at least two feet horizontally along the beam from each post position. The resultant span would be 8'.

The other thing i would do to lessen the load on the sidewall post and beam is to use purlins on the roof and metal roofing instead of sheathing and shingles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,965 Posts
neighbor's solution

Jeff- I will try to answer the question here. But what I may be able to do is send you an attachment of a sketch which may help. But first let me answer here.

Think of it as a barn with three sections. The main is 18 x 24 foot. Then we have to side sheds on either side which are 12 x 24 foot each. Between the three structures there are no interior walls. The only walls are the Gable end walls & the outside shed walls. Those outside shed walls are built on THREE 6"x6" posts that are currently spaced by the plan at 12 foot span. So that gives me the two corner posts & the one post in the middle of the wall. The architect has stated that the shed structure can carry a "Ground/Snow load of 90 psi.

Now we come to the main barn area of 18'x24'. The 18 foot dimension which are the Gable end posts are no problem at all. It's the posts for the 24 foot run. The architect's original plan calls for posts @ 6 foot apart. But keep in mind he is selling a plan that is designed to work 99% in the lower 48 states & maybe Russia too? What I wanted to do is use the same post spans on the main 24foot structure as was used on the shed walls. This would give me a nice open space with only one center span post on either side of the main building. There are NO walls between the main building & the shed buildings. So I have a nice open full area of 24 x 42 feet when all is said & done.

So what's on top of the 6x6 posts. Well at the perimeter of the top main bldg. posts will be double 2'10's notched & bolted to the posts on one side of the post & on the other side would be a double 2x10 as well which would be needed for the interior joist runs, storage floor, etc. Sitting on top of the perimeter girder edge are the 2x 8's capping off the posts & girders, that would be the roof plate or rafter birds mouth plate which would be built up from the double 2 x 8.

I did consult with the architect. He could not tell me if a 12 foot span on the main bldg. was a problem without going back & reworking load calculations, etc. He also expressed concern that at a twelve foot span, I might be concentrating too much weight under the supporting column regarding the ground conditions.

Sorry- back to your question. What's on top of the posts is the roof rafters for a gable roof. If the architect has stated that the shed end walls with 3 posts, can carry 90 psi but he is not sure about the three posts in the the main bldg. it must be due to the weight of the gable roof?

Here are the issues with the code. My footing holes have been approved. No questions were asked about what I was building or how. No discussion about post spacing. Then on my own I looked up the code for Post & beam buildings. Don't ask me why I did that. I guess I like to stay up late working on problems. Anyway 2012, IRC code R106 Titled "Post and Frame Structures"States in its requirements as #1-Residential accessory structure., #8 Max. post spacing of 8 feet. Then it goes on to another code R301 & I'm lost. I tried to find lumber span tables to give me some help but I can't make out what they are telling me.

So if the code says 8 foot limit & I do 12, how do I get around the issue with the build official. Also in this thread another member has commented that there is no R106 code & I may be confusing it with something else which has no bearing on what I am building. However I do have in front of me 6 pages of code Titled as above on the subject.

My post holes- I'm down 3 feet & poured in a reinforced concrete pad 4' thick to set the posts on & then back fill with more concrete. The hole diameter is 12 inches. Inspector looked at it & said ok to it. But the architect made me think my holes(no pun intended) are not good enough. I kind of disagree with that because its not the depth of the hole as much as it is with the support ability & weight dispersal through the pad at the bottom of the hole.

I sent an email to my build dept. mgr., trying to ask around this situation for an answer without being specific. I doubt I will hear back, & if the other member's post here is correct about my mixing up code requirements this might be just a learning exercise. I'm eager to order my lumber before we hit 95 degree days down here in the sunny steam bath south, but I really can't get a lumber list going without an answer to the post question. Any help at all would be appreciated. Any clarification you need let me know. Maybe you could look into the code thing. Maybe I have that wrong as our fellow member has suggested. Thank you.
I had a neighbor considerably remodel his house and wanted a similar open span. He ended up getting a combo steel/wood beam made up with steel inside and wood outside. I'm not sure if he had an engineer/architect signature on it or not but the building inspector said ok. I think there are two issues- one is ultimate strength- will the beam hold the proposed load? Can it do so with some margin of safety given that things aren't always perfect or perfectly assembled?

The other issue is deflection. Even if your beam holds the load, you don't want it sagging and bringing the roof out of alignment or looking like a swayback horse. That's an over time issue so it could look perfect when constructed but next year or the one after that you would notice things are getting lower and lower. A proper sized beam will take care of both issues.

Years ago we built a pole barn that has 18' clear spans. The beams were hand built 72' long and made up as a plywood/1 x 6 I beam. The plywood is 2' top to bottom (actually a bit less as we cut 2 from each sheet) and then on the top and bottom of the plywood are 4 1 x 6's glued and nailed to the plywood. Since the beam is so high top to bottom, it has enormous strength. That was a farm structure so at the time, we didn't need a permit. However, it's been there over 30 years with little to no deflection. We've even had a post rot out in the middle and the effective span was 36' until we replaced the post and that only had minimal effect.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,432 Posts
I had a neighbor considerably remodel his house and wanted a similar open span. He ended up getting a combo steel/wood beam made up with steel inside and wood outside.

Treefarmer
IIRC railroad ties have that. if you could get some really long ones....:unknown:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,042 Posts
Jeff- I will try to answer the question here. But what I may be able to do is send you an attachment of a sketch which may help. But first let me answer here.

Think of it as a barn with three sections. The main is 18 x 24 foot. Then we have to side sheds on either side which are 12 x 24 foot each. Between the three structures there are no interior walls. The only walls are the Gable end walls & the outside shed walls. Those outside shed walls are built on THREE 6"x6" posts that are currently spaced by the plan at 12 foot span. So that gives me the two corner posts & the one post in the middle of the wall. The architect has stated that the shed structure can carry a "Ground/Snow load of 90 psi.

Now we come to the main barn area of 18'x24'. The 18 foot dimension which are the Gable end posts are no problem at all. It's the posts for the 24 foot run. The architect's original plan calls for posts @ 6 foot apart. But keep in mind he is selling a plan that is designed to work 99% in the lower 48 states & maybe Russia too? What I wanted to do is use the same post spans on the main 24foot structure as was used on the shed walls. This would give me a nice open space with only one center span post on either side of the main building. There are NO walls between the main building & the shed buildings. So I have a nice open full area of 24 x 42 feet when all is said & done.

So what's on top of the 6x6 posts. Well at the perimeter of the top main bldg. posts will be double 2'10's notched & bolted to the posts on one side of the post & on the other side would be a double 2x10 as well which would be needed for the interior joist runs, storage floor, etc. Sitting on top of the perimeter girder edge are the 2x 8's capping off the posts & girders, that would be the roof plate or rafter birds mouth plate which would be built up from the double 2 x 8.

I did consult with the architect. He could not tell me if a 12 foot span on the main bldg. was a problem without going back & reworking load calculations, etc. He also expressed concern that at a twelve foot span, I might be concentrating too much weight under the supporting column regarding the ground conditions.

Sorry- back to your question. What's on top of the posts is the roof rafters for a gable roof. If the architect has stated that the shed end walls with 3 posts, can carry 90 psi but he is not sure about the three posts in the the main bldg. it must be due to the weight of the gable roof?

Here are the issues with the code. My footing holes have been approved. No questions were asked about what I was building or how. No discussion about post spacing. Then on my own I looked up the code for Post & beam buildings. Don't ask me why I did that. I guess I like to stay up late working on problems. Anyway 2012, IRC code R106 Titled "Post and Frame Structures"States in its requirements as #1-Residential accessory structure., #8 Max. post spacing of 8 feet. Then it goes on to another code R301 & I'm lost. I tried to find lumber span tables to give me some help but I can't make out what they are telling me.

So if the code says 8 foot limit & I do 12, how do I get around the issue with the build official. Also in this thread another member has commented that there is no R106 code & I may be confusing it with something else which has no bearing on what I am building. However I do have in front of me 6 pages of code Titled as above on the subject.

My post holes- I'm down 3 feet & poured in a reinforced concrete pad 4' thick to set the posts on & then back fill with more concrete. The hole diameter is 12 inches. Inspector looked at it & said ok to it. But the architect made me think my holes(no pun intended) are not good enough. I kind of disagree with that because its not the depth of the hole as much as it is with the support ability & weight dispersal through the pad at the bottom of the hole.

I sent an email to my build dept. mgr., trying to ask around this situation for an answer without being specific. I doubt I will hear back, & if the other member's post here is correct about my mixing up code requirements this might be just a learning exercise. I'm eager to order my lumber before we hit 95 degree days down here in the sunny steam bath south, but I really can't get a lumber list going without an answer to the post question. Any help at all would be appreciated. Any clarification you need let me know. Maybe you could look into the code thing. Maybe I have that wrong as our fellow member has suggested. Thank you.
Maddog, you guys are way ahead of us here in Mass, we are still in the 2009 IRC and the R106 isn't even the same code, (we are headed into he 2015 IRC codes very soon in fact it will be promulgated this summer), however, I can talk about a couple things even without that code. First, thanks for the picture I now have in my head of your barn. Your footings are not designed to take the loads you speak of, 4" will not cut it, 12" thick by at least a 24" square will work. Second I would not use a flitch plate beam as someone spoke about (that is a design professionals responsibility and you could be undersized), you can actually head to your nearest lumber supplier and let them know the span you want and any LVL company that has the computer edition will spit out the proper sized LVL and how many needed to span what you want to do, (you are trying to carry the main roof load plus the load from rafters on your side shed roof plus snow loading and possible snow drifting which can occur with winds blowing snow from one side of the roof to another). The support posts can be steel cement filled lally columns bolted (use a Springfield plate top and bottom) to a 12" sono tube that is resting on the new footing that I mentioned and also bolted to the beam above. You can also go with I beams for posts and with both of these ideas you paint the steel post with rust resistant paint.. I don't know why your architect didn't advise you of this? This is simple construction not complicated at all. In fact we have quite a few of our farmers and orchard people in my three towns that have the same type of barns you want to build and they all have very large tractors that use side entrances and this is what they have done. I accept LVL specs from a lumber yard because computer designed beams cannot go below what is put into the computer, it will fail a design if you put the parameters in and want say a 12" lvl, it will say no and then spec out what is required. remember, what you tell the people for the LVL design is what the computer will spit out, so it is important to be exact with length, width, snow loads and stories above.. I hope this helps.. Also you can go to any Lally manufacturers site and see what the column you want; say 3.5" will support.. That's all you need to head to the inspectors office with and as long as your calculations are good you will not have an issue and your structure will not end up with the "sway back horse" as mentioned! I love that term, (my wife said if we had a horse and I ride it that's exactly what would happen to it) She nuts! Good luck and I hope I made this as easy to understand as it is in my head! Jeff,,, Please remember; I am a Massachusetts building official not from SC and we do have different responsibilities; we accept worse here for sure with law suits and people wanting to blame the inspector for everything so we need to be a bit more "anal" I'll call it.. How do I know this? I have a friend that moved to SC and he tells me things like his inspectors drive by stuff.. and what a Pr*** i am !!!!! And really, I am not!!! I just want what the code says, nothing more nothing less.. That way I don't have to remember what I told someone to do outside of the code, I am getting older !!!!! One more thing, remember this, minimum code is a step above junk!
Most important;; I am by no means saying inspectors in others areas are not good inspectors, they wouldn't be where they are if they weren't, I was making a comparison of one particular place. Not directly being disrespectful by any means, I needed to put this in, I do not what to offend anyone. Jeff
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top