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I have a situation on the west fence line of my north west pasture in which there is an underground stream that flows under me fence then south a half mile accross my land to dump into the creek. This year when i repalced that fence there had been one old growth cedar fence post right smack dab in the middle of this stream. On the surface the ground is dry but two feet down it is flowing i could see that when i dug out the post to replace it. The old post was wobbly but still intact after 76 years. I know the complete history of my land because the family that pioneered it and owned the whole valley are my neighbors. When i replaced that post i used a section of old telephone pole 8 feet long as there were no cedar posts available. I also used a couple of bags of concrete dry then filled it and packed it. The reason for this stream is mostly because of my neighbor on that side that irrigate pasture 24/7 all summer and part of the fall with much of the water flowing back into the creek. Untill i dug out this post i had no idea that this streeam was flowing under my land or how much my neighbor was contributing to the problem. There are people that make good money searching for submerged trees, logs that have been under foir decades because the wood is often very hard and of high dollar value.

I know cyprus is one wood type from down south that can be waterlogged.
 

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Installed a driveway alarm yesterday. This is something we’ve sorely needed for a long time.

We are both partially crippled up and spend most of our time in the back room of the house in our chairs. In our “sitting room” we have a beautiful view of the creek and mountains. Constant wildlife to see.

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The issue is we can’t see or hear the driveway from that room unless you get up and look out the window.

I have a Wyze cam installed on the front porch. Here us the view from that -

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This is great as I can see most of the driveway. However to view this camera I have to use my iPad. I can set it for alerts but then each time I would have to pick up the iPad to view. Also...my wife doesn’t know how to do that.

The other big issue with the camera is it picks up anything that moves. We have tons of wildlife here - it was alerting for something dozens of times a day.

So a magnetic driveway alarm seemed like a good step. When it activates I can then either get up and look out the window of look at the camera on the iPad.

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I used my tractor as a test vehicle while my wife monitored the monitor inside. It works great! I am getting a false alarm once in a while - I turned down the sensitivity a notch yesterday which helped a lot but still need to tweak it a little more.

I plan to install a 4x4 post where the temporary plastic fence post is now. Wanted to be sure of the location of the transmitter first. I can easily move stuff around if need be right now.

It’s a Mighty Mule driveway sensor which was gifted to me from @mark02tj who ended up with a higher end unit due to needing a longer range. My transmitter is 180’ from the indoor unit and in line of sight. The specs say it’s good for 400’ but that would be in optimum comditions.
 

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I have had 2 of those for about 4 years. They work very well. However i have begun to notice that they will sometimes fail. I may have to replace them

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I have had 2 of those for about 4 years. They work very well. However i have begun to notice that they will sometimes fail. I may have to replace them

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That’s OK - much better than living in suburbia!
 

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I know cyprus is one wood type from down south that can be waterlogged.
I think any wood submerged in the right conditions and left for a 100 years or so will turen into a very hard quality wood.
Does cyprus make good fence posts? Cedar does if old growth
 

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Now that you're saying it drys up every year I would be more concerned about wicking wicking effect on post. Treatment on the post is only surface treated and penetrates maybe an 1/8 inch into the post. With every year that treatment wears off and wicking effect will higher up the post. I know there is nothing you can about now just something to think about.
I might know somebody who makes a practice of putting his salt treated posts into a bucket of waste motor oil for a day or so before putting them in the ground. He says it makes the posts last much longer. I haven' tried it myself but it makes sense as used oil is certainly a wood preservative, much better than fresh oil for some reason.

Treefarmer
 

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I think any wood submerged in the right conditions and left for a 100 years or so will turen into a very hard quality wood.
Does cyprus make good fence posts? Cedar does if old growth
Cyprus also has anti rot properties.

Some years ago, I sawed some pilings that were pulled out of the river from an old steamboat wharf. The outside was a mess but the inside of the pilings was fresh, clear lumber. I don't know how old they were but the steamboats stopped running sometime in the early 1900's to that wharf. I'm old, but not that old lol.

Treefarmer
 

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I might know somebody who makes a practice of putting his salt treated posts into a bucket of waste motor oil for a day or so before putting them in the ground. He says it makes the posts last much longer. I haven' tried it myself but it makes sense as used oil is certainly a wood preservative, much better than fresh oil for some reason.

Treefarmer
I suspect it would be because it contains metals like copper which is one of the most lethal to life substances known. They banned it from boat anti fouling bottom paint because of its toxicity to all living things. That was back in the 80's I think. Not something i would want in my well water for sure.
 

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Cypress can last a very long time. Around here they spend a great deal of their time with several feet of the trunk submerged, thus the growth of the "Knees". Little if any old growth around here, but bald cypress have been aged at > 2,000 years old.

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Cypress can last a very long time. Around here they spend a great deal of their time with several feet of the trunk submerged, thus the growth of the "Knees". Little if any old growth around here, but bald cypress have been aged at > 2,000 years old.

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I've never seen one. In fact i have never spent any time anyplace in the South. On my got to do list to take some time and just bum around and see the sights.
 

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I've never seen one. In fact i have never spent any time anyplace in the South. On my got to do list to take some time and just bum around and see the sights.
Here's a pic from when I used to actually work in the woods. Most trees in the pic are smaller cypress, you can see some knees on the right side of the pic, especially back towards the water.


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Well it wasnt today, it was Sunday but I started cutting back some trails. They are established, but several years overgrown and need to be cut back on the sides. Made some decent progress, but have been reevaluating my equipment choices. Next time I am bringing the hedge trimmer with me, I think that may keep the machetes on the SxS and really increase production. Pole saw works fantastic. So the arsenal will include, pole saw, hedge trimmer, bush axe, axe, machetes and BUG SPRAY! I'll put the bush hog on it as soon as I get them cut back, probably have about a mile and half or more to go...

I hate chiggers, they are the devils offspring.
 

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Here's a pic from when I used to actually work in the woods. Most trees in the pic are smaller cypress, you can see some knees on the right side of the pic, especially back towards the water.


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Those are beautiful. Thanks for posting the pix.
Whats the best time of the year to visit the area these trees grow in? Is this in Florida? Only ever been there once and that was to pick up a boat i bought to trailer it back to Oregon
 

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Those are beautiful. Thanks for posting the pix.
Whats the best time of the year to visit the area these trees grow in? Is this in Florida? Only ever been there once and that was to pick up a boat i bought to trailer it back to Oregon
You're welcome. North Louisiana. If you want to not have to use a boat, September or October are usually our drier months where the water will be lower in the bayous and/or swamp areas.

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Well it wasnt today, it was Sunday but I started cutting back some trails. They are established, but several years overgrown and need to be cut back on the sides. Made some decent progress, but have been reevaluating my equipment choices. Next time I am bringing the hedge trimmer with me, I think that may keep the machetes on the SxS and really increase production. Pole saw works fantastic. So the arsenal will include, pole saw, hedge trimmer, bush axe, axe, machetes and BUG SPRAY! I'll put the bush hog on it as soon as I get them cut back, probably have about a mile and half or more to go...

I hate chiggers, they are the devils offspring.
Them there chiggers is even smaller than ticks right? Aint never seen a chigger.
I used to carry all that stuff with me also then one day I discovered that my Kombi system pole trimmer worked better trimming bushes than my expensive hedge trimmers. I like the system cause you only have one motor and what ever attachments you need and the attachments don't take up hardly any room. I found i can get a straighter cut as well with the pole trimmer than the hedge trimmer. Hedge trimmers only like to cut leaves and tiny soft new growth while the pole trimmer cuts it all.


Hey, if your having issues with them itty bitty gnats a "Bee hat will keep them off your head. I hate those things and fought them for years and anymore i like to carry a bee veil with me. They are cheap . An Alexander veil takes no room and can be wadded up and worn under your hat or with no hat. Here is a link to many different styles. I don't think they will keep out chiggers though.

 

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Them there chiggers is even smaller than ticks right? Aint never seen a chigger.
I used to carry all that stuff with me also then one day I discovered that my Kombi system pole trimmer worked better trimming bushes than my expensive hedge trimmers. I like the system cause you only have one motor and what ever attachments you need and the attachments don't take up hardly any room. I found i can get a straighter cut as well with the pole trimmer than the hedge trimmer. Hedge trimmers only like to cut leaves and tiny soft new growth while the pole trimmer cuts it all.


I am a Stihl fan, my tractors are green and hand held gas powered tools are white and orange! I think the pole saw is a HT133, big, heavy and a hoss... extends to like 11'. I cant remember what the hedge trimmer is, its a few years old but its pretty good size too. I really like the KM Kombi set up. The KM131R looks like a beast, pole saw, hedge trimmer and scythe look nice. Dang thing is these tools rarely wear out, I have a 25 year old FS-85 string trimmer that still runs great. So I may not need to replace them anytime soon. I guess I could always add to the tool box right?

I cant say it enough, I hate chiggers
 

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I suspect it would be because it contains metals like copper which is one of the most lethal to life substances known. They banned it from boat anti fouling bottom paint because of its toxicity to all living things. That was back in the 80's I think. Not something i would want in my well water for sure.
LOL, I used to use that paint on a sailboat. It worked well to keep barnacles off. I think the copper replaced lead in earlier paints.

In the case of the oil, I'm not sure it's copper. A friend who did a lot of statistical work on water quality tested used oil against fresh oil on the organisms that degrade wood. There was a definite difference in the two oils so it's something that's produced in the engine. He didn't go as far as figuring out what caused the difference but presumably it's a changed caused by the heat or by blowby of the fuel. Carbon maybe?

Treefarmer
 

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I've never seen one. In fact i have never spent any time anyplace in the South. On my got to do list to take some time and just bum around and see the sights.
I have a couple of cyprus that are on dry land. Well one is on dry land, the other is on land that's sometimes pretty wet. They are very cool trees. We're close to the northern edge of their territory but just 20-50 miles south they are more common. I've also got a few cyprus boards which are light, rot resistant and very strong for their size and thickness. I got them for the bottom of duck decoys and have saved a few back.

Treefarmer
 

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LOL, I used to use that paint on a sailboat. It worked well to keep barnacles off. I think the copper replaced lead in earlier paints.

In the case of the oil, I'm not sure it's copper. A friend who did a lot of statistical work on water quality tested used oil against fresh oil on the organisms that degrade wood. There was a definite difference in the two oils so it's something that's produced in the engine. He didn't go as far as figuring out what caused the difference but presumably it's a changed caused by the heat or by blowby of the fuel. Carbon maybe?

Treefarmer
In the day of the main they used copper on the bottom of ships not lead. Copper was the roundup of its day and today it is just as deadly as ever. Wasn't untill recently I realize copper pipes were still in use for potable water and city water or well water for that matter can be slightly acidic. That means many people are ingesting elemental copper in trace amounts with every glass of water they drink. No one has looked at the possible health ramifications as a result as yet. Cast iron is likely the pipe that should be required for potable water because the scale buildup with iron can easily be prevented and a little extra iron in ones diet will never hurt anyone.
Copper is used in many alloys used in power systems especially bearings and they do wear. Oil is designed to capture crud and particles holding them in suspension to protect the engine.
I'm not familiar with the environmental impact of the other metals that will show up in an oil analysis but likely as not some of those may be a tad on the toxic side in micron sized particles.
 
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