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Is your well going to have a bucket on a string crank with a roof over it? Holy cow that is big.
 

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Is your well going to have a bucket on a string crank with a roof over it? Holy cow that is big.
I'm not a well expert, but from what I've read, and based on what the well guys have said, this well is only 42 feet deep, because the water table is so high. This is more of a shallow well setup and while is should be drinkable with normal filtering etc, I don't plan on drinking it. The stacked, segmented concrete rings allow the ground water to seep into the center and collect up to the top of the natural water table. About 12 feet from the top, its sealed off with a concrete cap and bentonite to keep surface water from entering. From there up is just a normal 6"PVC pipe to the surface.
 

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Two of my neighbors have wells like that, called “bucket wells” by the well digger. Our ground water in this area is sketchy as to whether or not you’ll get into any water when you drill. The bucket well collects more water in reserve and ii helps with a slow recovery time on a smaller more traditional well.
 

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Did find a stand of persimmons I didbt know existed yesterday once the locust and hedge were cleared away from them.
Did you leave the persimmons? Deer like them, just sayin'.
 

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Honey Locust makes good firewood!!!

Dave
 

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Did you leave the persimmons? Deer like them, just sayin'.
Humans like them too! Persimmon pudding... yum! 😋
 

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On the second day of winter it was 63 degrees. Yesterday it was 65. Told my boss the next 10 days where going to be cold and I needed some tractor time. So I worked on cleaning up an old fence row. My plan is to plant about four grafted Pawnee pecan seedlings in this spot come February or March. Cut several wild sweet pecans and the three largest hackberrys. Barb wire had grown into them and its a good thing I had safety glasses on because a piece hit in my left lens while cutting! Note my homemade post puller. It worked well. The JD 4105 is just like my old woman, she's a keeper too!
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You can have all you want. I only mess with the hedge for the most part. Also some mulberry, and ash.

Coordinator says for the 4 or 5 trees in there I can leave them. Provided I cut everything else.

Got more done today.
The plywood up front is a great idea for moving brush!
Add that to the project list.
 

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ANNUAL KUDZU DAY!!!

Each Winter, I wait for one of the few days with high temps around 50 degrees so I can tackle unwanted vines. It's warm enough to work, but the cold keeps unwanted creatures in their holes so I can safely wade into the brush. Today was the day!

In the wooded areas next to my property (golf course and county land), there are three major types of vines -- Kudzu, Greenbrier, and a five-leaf (non-irritating) poison ivy. Each of these can grow up to three feet per day in the Spring. Some of the woody vines are four inches in diameter at the root. I think I finally got all of the "feeder" vines cut, so next year I'll focus on the mats of 1/8" to 1/4" runners that completely carpet the ground in several areas. I know I'll never win, but if I keep them out of the canopy, we should be able to coexist! The difference I've made in the past four years is very noticable. These vines are definitely the chosen nemesis for my retirement years. I actually look forward to they days I take them on.
 

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ANNUAL KUDZU DAY!!!

Each Winter, I wait for one of the few days with high temps around 50 degrees so I can tackle unwanted vines. It's warm enough to work, but the cold keeps unwanted creatures in their holes so I can safely wade into the brush. Today was the day!

In the wooded areas next to my property (golf course and county land), there are three major types of vines -- Kudzu, Greenbrier, and a five-leaf (non-irritating) poison ivy. Each of these can grow up to three feet per day in the Spring. Some of the woody vines are four inches in diameter at the root. I think I finally got all of the "feeder" vines cut, so next year I'll focus on the mats of 1/8" to 1/4" runners that completely carpet the ground in several areas. I know I'll never win, but if I keep them out of the canopy, we should be able to coexist! The difference I've made in the past four years is very noticable. These vines are definitely the chosen nemesis for my retirement years. I actually look forward to they days I take them on.
I always do some brush work like that in the winter - but not too many vines. Woking in the woods in the winter is great - get's me out of the house and also it's so easy to see what you are doing without everything greened up.

The past few winters we never got our usual snow pack so that makes it all that much easier.
 
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