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Discussion Starter #1
Recently we cleared about 2 acres of my property.


Before
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After

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Unfortunately, after we finished we had some of the worst storms ever and rivers of water flowed down the hill making huge ruts. I need to basically smooth everything out again. There are also a bunch of big clumps left from the bulldozer that I need to knock down and smooth out. Should I get a tiller, a box blade, ???? What's the best tool to attach to my 1025r?


Thanks for any tips!
 

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Hard to tell in the pictures due to distance. But this sounds like a box blade kind of job to me.
 

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Are you leaving it dirt, or do you want grass to grow there?

How bad are the washout areas? This can determine if a box blade is warranted IMO.

Just dirt, rototill it and your done.

Grass, then box blade and landscape rake.

Actually I would probably till and then use a rake, but turn the rake around backwards.

It sort of depends on how bad the areas are that need to be filled in as far as what implement-s would be best to use.

Pictures of the damaged areas?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'll get some pics of the bad areas tomorrow (dark now). I want to put grass down when I'm done.

What do the box blade and rake do differently?
 

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I’m a fan of a minimalist approach to this. If you want to keep those trees alive, you don’t want to disturb their roots. You’ve already had a dozer in there, so you’ll want to be careful how much more disturbance you cause.
 

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I'll get some pics of the bad areas tomorrow (dark now). I want to put grass down when I'm done.

What do the box blade and rake do differently?
A box blade is designed to move material, not that it has to be used that way, you can just smooth things out with it also.

A landscape rake when used turned around so that the tines are backward simply smooths things out without gathering a bunch of stuff.

Picture is only to give you an idea of the finish they can leave.
 

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If the ruts are not deep then a landscape rake or even a land plane will do the job. If the ruts are severe then a box blade or tiller can do the job.

I would base my decision on how bad the ruts are, how much I want to spend, and how much my 1 series can handle.

You can also see about maybe renting a Harley Rake or having someone come back and smooth it for you with a skid steer. While a big upfront expense it might be worth considering if you do not have any other intended uses for the implement you are considering. :bigthumb:
 

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I would and have used a landscape rake with great effect. Also, I have smoothed a lot of dirt and simply used the bottom of the FEL bucket.

I would try and repair the damaged areas washed out using the FEL bucket. The dozer did a lot of the tough work already and unless the damage to the soil areas are severe, I can't see having to roto till the soil at this point. You will be surprised how much you can do with the FEL.

If your tractor is fairly new to you, it takes some time and practice to get the box blade down. Also, its behind you and that makes using it a little less easy than working out in front of you. If the rain has left you with a project that requires changing grades, etc then the box blade might be the easiest way. You just have to practice with the blade and get the feel for it.

You can really smooth out the grade with the landscape rake, plus its great at cleaning up debris, which the water likely left in the area.

No question, you are going to want to rake it before and maybe after planting the seed. If you are going to broadcast the seed, then you will need to cover it so the birds don't carry it off. If you are going to drill in the seed, getting the final surface ready with the rake is also a great approach. Also, you can hang suitcase weights on the rake for down pressure to move enough soil to make the final surface really nice.
 

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I'm thinking the earth would still be fairly loose and not too heavily rooted. If so, I'd go with the landscape rake. I've never utilized a box blade much and it does take some practice to become proficient---which I'm not. Moreover, attempting to shape landscape with a box blade would definitely require some talent. If it is still firm and rooted, you may have to loosen it with a box blade or a tiller first, then follow with the landscape rake.

Bear in mind, once you loosen it up, it will really be susceptible to washing out, so plan on methods to mitigate that (hay bales, washout sock, etc)

Also, gauge wheels are pretty much a necessity on a landscape rake.

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Having seen the video, I changed my mind. I'd say landscape rake since you have so much debris and rocks to cleanup too. And it's already grass.
 

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This all in one tool would be good but I'm sure it's pricey but what would all three cost plus taking on and off. Looks interesting though. They make different sizes.

TR3 E - Property Edition
 

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It was mentioned up above but might’ve been overlooked. A power rake (aka Harley Rake) is hands down the best tool for the job. Nothing else will even come close for what you’re wanting to do. The one drawback is that it’s expensive so renting would be the best option.


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