Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've always used Star Tron in my small engines to cure ethanol problems and stabilize fuel. It's been great. Was thinking of using their diesel product. What do you like for your tractors?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
I have just used JD summer and winter additive since new. No problems, but nothing else to compair to though either.

Kevin.

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,409 Posts
I would recommend a few minutes with the search tool. There are already multiple threads on this forum on the same subject. Pull up a chair and be prepared to hear 9 different suggestions from 10 different people. :)

:munch:

Oh... and... JD Diesel Fuel Protect Winter Formula... Yeah!!!!


:hide:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
This is my first winter with a diesel. I noticed last night that quick trip has tags on their diesel hoses stating that their fuel is "winterized". I treated my fuel a couple of weeks ago with power service. but I fear I treated summer blend and may have been better off waiting for the "winterized" tags before I bough my winter fuel. I guess I will just have to burn up what I have before it gets cold. :) If I do it again I will probably go with Howes based on the video linked above. I know they have that at my local store.

It is 24f here today it might be a long winter.

Do you all have problems with fuel gelling once the tractor is running or is only an issue on the cold starts? It would seem that once everything is running there would be enough heat around to warm up the fuel a bit. But I dunno.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
This video has me re-thinking diesel fuel additives, especially as winter approaches

Which Diesel Anti-Gel Additive is Best? Lets find out! - YouTube
Now that you have re-thought it, what are you going to do? I grew up in Eveleth so I know how cold it can be up there but the wind down here is something fierce in the winter. I'd way rather have -20f and calm than 0f with a 20mph wind.

I snowblowed last winter with my full faced snowmobile helmet. It was the only way I could handle the wind. And that wasn't even the snow dust that was just wind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
I use Opti-Lube XPD in my truck (2008 Duramax) and since I just siphon 5 gallons out of the truck when I need it for the tractor, I use it in that too.

It's kind of dated but you may find this a good read regarding lubricity at least. Not sure how important this is with the injectors in our tractors.
Diesel_fuel_additive_test.pdf
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,409 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I've always used Star Tron in my small engines to cure ethanol problems and stabilize fuel. It's been great. Was thinking of using their diesel product. What do you like for your tractors?

Thanks!
Star-Tron enzyme gas treatment is great stuff, works well for cleaning gum and deposits. I use it for my generators and other 4-stroke carbureted small engines. I think the enzyme diesel additive is the same stuff, only in a more concentrated formula.

Their Pro Star LPC Diesel Additive, for cold weather use is one that I have not used. They make no claims about anti-gelling temperatures, if that is what you are wanting.

The enzyme gas treatment is great for engines, large and small, with carburetors, but if you are looking for an additive for water-in-fuel and anti-gelling purposes in fuel injected engines, I think that I would look elsewhere.

At the moment, I am using Howe's Lubricator for my 1025R, and will likely stick with that year-round. It does not emulsify water into the fuel and run it through the fuel system, but rather makes it drop out and settle in the water trap. That said, you might need to use a bio-cide to prevent algae in the fuel tank if water settles in the tank and is not drawn through the fuel system. It appears that the tank is a gravity feed style, but I'm not sure if there is a lower area where water can collect and settle below the fuel line.

****************
From the Howe's website.
⮟⮟⮟
Many products emulsify or disperse water and frequently use alcohols or solvents that can do damage to your engine. Howes Diesel Treat is a premium petroleum based product that demulsifies water, safely removing it from diesel fuel. It contains no alcohol or other harmful solvents, making it warranty safe for all diesel emission systems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,608 Posts
For me its simple, I treat all diesel fuel year around with Howe's. Why? Because;

1. - It increases the Cetane level which produces more power.
2. - It increases lubricity to protect fuel system parts
3. - It reduces the diesel smoke of the ULSD, which is also why it achieves items 1, and 2.
4. - For me, the winter fuel summer fuel, winter blending doesn't matter as I treat all fuel the same.
5. - Just keep it simple and you never have to worry about missing "blending dates" or is my fuel winter fuel or summer fuel nonsense...

Emusifier verses De-Emulsifier fuel additives
Probably the most important lesson as a diesel owner is to Make sure you take the time to read and understand the difference between an "Emulsifier" and a "De-Emulsifier", which is VERY important.

In a nutshell, Emulsifiers bind the water in the fuel so the engine burns it. In my opinion and my experience, this is BAD. Why do people do it? Its the "easy" way to deal with moisture in suspense (water) in the diesel fuel issue.

A "De-emulsifier" removes the water from the diesel so it can be separated, as does the fuel system on your tractor by design with the filters and the fuel separator canister on the engine.

Water is heavier than diesel and always goes to the bottom of the tank or container. That is why the red plastic ring in in the fuel separator, if the ring is floating, you have water in the fuel. Very easy to tell by simply looking at the fuel separator canister. Don't take the ring out when you change the filter, its supposed to be in there as I described.

How do you know if a product is an emulsifier and a de- emulsifier? Here are easy ways to tell.

- If it has alcohol or any chemical that is in the alcohol family and the chemical name ends in the "ol", its likely an emulsifier.

- If the blending instructions are very specific and indicate NOT to exceed so many ounces per gallon, the product is an emulsifier.

- De-emulsifier products are NOT harmful if used in ratios greater than the blending recommended. It doesn't hurt a thing. It says so right on the product labels.

- Just imagine what happens when you blend and emulsifier product and a de emulsfier product. Lets just say its not a good idea.

Learn about diesel fuel, specifically Bio-diesel verses "Dino" Diesel and the differences
Very important to take the time and learn about diesel fuels, how they work and the differences in the treating processes. A good starting point are the Wikipedia pages as they aren't overly technical and they are fairly succinct.

Here is another simple FACT to keep in mind. Water freezes and water in fuel is the major cause of problems in cold weather. There is always going to be some water in fuel from condensation in the storage tanks, etc. But Bio-Diesel fuel can contain as much as 10 TIMES the amount of "moisture in suspense", which is the natural water in fuel from a variety of functions. SO, its logical that if you want to avoid problems with cold weather diesel fuel issues, the best way to start is to not use Bio-diesel fuel. Not only is bio-diesel higher in moisture in suspense, its also lower in cetane, which means it requires more fuel to produce the same amount of load moving power.

The two most common Power Service Products are very different and possibly incompatible with one another
Power Service, Emergency 911 in the red bottle is an EMULSIFIER PRODUCT and is VERY HARD on fuel injectors and injector pumps. It is NOT a fuel treatment and does NOTHING to prevent cold flow fuel problems or to lower the filter filter freeze point. Many people think its a fuel treatment. It's NOT, it is a "rescue product" to get a diesel engine which has experienced either paraffin separation or frozen filters to run again. Make sure to keep yourself from ever needing this product and simply treating your fuel is the best way.

Power service in the White Bottle is one of the largest selling "Fuel treatment" product. Make sure to read the labels as this product has changed as for years, it contained alcohol, which made it an emulsifier product. Now the white bottle product of Power Service appears to be a "De-emulsifier product. Double check labels and proceed carefully. Personally, I don't use either of these Power Service products.

Diesel fuel and the cold weather treatment products should be warm when blended.
One very important thing to keep in mind and is often a mistake made by rookies and veterans alike. Fuel treatment products do not lower the filter freeze point nor do they provide the protection designed against cold weather fuel issues if they are blended into cold fuel, near or below freezing temps.

Make sure to keep the fuel treatment products at warmer temps and always blend the diesel fuel with treatments when the fuel is warmer. Whether that means out of the tank at the station or in fuel jugs kept in a heated building, etc. If the products are below freezing temps when blended, they won't mix and won't work.


You can blend fuel in the tractor tank, if the fuel is warm enough.
As a diesel engine in these tractors runs (as is the case with most diesels) there is a fuel return line which returns the excess volume of pumped fuel from the engine compartment back to the fuel tank. The longer the tractor runs, the more the fuel temp increases to a point. Fuel in the tank can be 20 or 30 degrees warmer than the ambient temps from this recycling and the benefit of the engine heat warming the fuel lines. Also, you can use fuel filter heaters in extreme cold areas, but they usually aren't required in 90% of North America.

Some say they don't blend fuel year around as its too expensive. .....:dunno:
Most of these SCUTS and CUTS burn around a gallon of fuel per operating hour and the larger CUTS likely burn two gallons. That means if you use your tractor 300 hours a year like I do, that means treating ALL of your diesel fuel year around will increase your fuel costs by $0.05 cents per gallon times 300 gallons (or 600 gallons for those burning 2 gallons per hour) is a whopping $15 to $30 per year.......When someone tells me they don't treat their fuel to keep their costs down, it simply doesn't add up.


Do yourself a favor and learn about the diesel fuel you are buying.
Simply either go to the fuel stations website or find out who their fuel distributor is and go to their website. How do you learn who the fuel distributor is? Ask or make a note of the name on the trucks which fill their tanks.

Once you know the source of the diesel fuel, you can learn if they blend fuel, if they use additives and how they deal with cold weather fuel issues. This is important to know.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
923 Posts
I might try some , some day...:dunno: 8 years without it, have not noticed any issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Now that you have re-thought it, what are you going to do? I grew up in Eveleth so I know how cold it can be up there but the wind down here is something fierce in the winter. I'd way rather have -20f and calm than 0f with a 20mph wind.

I snowblowed last winter with my full faced snowmobile helmet. It was the only way I could handle the wind. And that wasn't even the snow dust that was just wind.
I used Howe's as a winter additive because it was what they had at the hardware store, but Howe's came out pretty much at the bottom on that guy's test for lubricity and Arlen Spicer's study from 2007 more-or-less bears out the Howe's relative lack of lubricity, finding the stuff to add little lubricity to the baseline ULSD fuel that he tested against. If true, that's a problem for me since I'm going 70/30 #1/#2, making Howe's supposed lubricity deficit all the more problematic. It did fair on gelling, though, so...I picked up some Stanadyne lubricity additive to add to the Howe's-treated stuff, threw the rest of the Howe's away. For now, I'm going to switch to the Hot Shot's Secret stuff. Absent objective data suggesting a different course.

I lived in Eveleth for a few years...lived on Long Lake in the mid 80's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,514 Posts
For diesel, Stanadyne Performance.
Now, pick what you like, but for me, there is no better option. Its worked for me for better than 7 years, and its easy to get locally. I dont like hunting down an additive.
They make fuel injection systems, so they should know, better than some, what works well and what doesnt, and whats necessary and whats just window dressing.
Even in that "test", they were one of the best.

For gas, Mercury Quickleen, with a touch of 2 stroke oil, and Mercury Quickstor.
Quickleen works better and costs less than Seafoam, 2 stroke oil keeps things from corroding should the fuel dry up, and Quickstor in case the fuel sits for a long time, rare here, but an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
Ive had zero carb/fuel related issues since using this mix starting 3 years ago, in 5 engines, and it actually cured a small issue I had with one of them.

All that said, I think this gets covered every month.
I sure dont mind replying with my opinion, because most times I dont even need to be asked for it, :laugh:
Obviously others have the same "problem." :lolol:
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top