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We're probably going to get a good frost tonight, and a hard freeze will be right around the corner so today I was picking probably the last batch of peppers from my garden. I grow a bunch of different varieties, and I try a few new ones every year. One of the new ones we tried this year was the Hot Portugal pepper. It is only around 7000-10000 on the heat index, so it isn't one of the hottest varieties out there, but it is maybe twice as hot as jalapeno peppers. It is also very sweet, and I think at present the Hot Portugal would be my favorite pepper. We've been throwing them in chili, sausage and peppers, and a few other things my wife has made. I also made my own concoction I call "hot corn bread" and I mix in about one whole cut-up Hot Portugal pepper into the mix. A few people I work with had it, and they said I should go hotter, so I want to make another batch and maybe put in three or four peppers.

Here is the pile of the Hot Portugals I picked today:

hot_port_pep.jpg

Not only do they taste great, but I think they are one of the neatest looking peppers.
 

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I love peppers and grow a variety every year. This year was, sweet: Cubanelle and two types of seet bell; hot: jalapeños, cherry, Hungarian wax, and ghost.

I love the Cubanelle for a sweet, they have a great flavor and aren't as bitter as a bell.

Jalapeños are in my garden every year since they're a good all purpose pepper. I pickled a bunch of them as well as the Hungarians and cherries. I grew the ghosts on a whim and I'm glad I did. At 1,200,000 on the scale you won't eat many raw (I didn't even dare to try) but I did use some in chili and salsa with good results. I dehydrated the rest and ground them into a powder that I can use on anything - it's great on pizza!
 

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I like many varieties of chili peppers. I like a good jalapeno for flavor, especially if it is a hot variety. Serrano is a good all around chili. I also grow and enjoy cayenne and tabasco peppers. I like habanero, but usually 1 good one diced will be all that a pot of chili needs for the effect. Thai hot peppers are really good added to Thai or Chinese food, and I grow a Hungarian HOT banana pepper that goes with almost anything.

Maybe next year, I can ty to grow the ghost pepper. I have to admit that one has me intrigued. And I'll be just crazy enough to try it once, raw. I can eat habaneros that way, so all I have to lose will be my taste buds for a few days! :lol:
 

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:munch::fed::drinks: repeat :thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I love peppers and grow a variety every year. This year was, sweet: Cubanelle and two types of seet bell; hot: jalapeños, cherry, Hungarian wax, and ghost.

I love the Cubanelle for a sweet, they have a great flavor and aren't as bitter as a bell.

Jalapeños are in my garden every year since they're a good all purpose pepper. I pickled a bunch of them as well as the Hungarians and cherries. I grew the ghosts on a whim and I'm glad I did. At 1,200,000 on the scale you won't eat many raw (I didn't even dare to try) but I did use some in chili and salsa with good results. I dehydrated the rest and ground them into a powder that I can use on anything - it's great on pizza!

I usually also grow some Cubanelles, but this year the local farm bureau where I try to by most of my plants didn't have any. I also started saving seeds this year, so hopefully from now on once I find some good peppers I will be able to grow my own from seed and not worry about what the local greenhouse has.

And my next question, did you grow the ghost peppers from seed or buy the plants? If from seed, where did you get the seeds? We always grow a bunch of habaneros, and I've been wanting to try the ghosts.

We planted a rat turd pepper this year, and the dang rabbits kept eating it! It finally got three peppers on it after I covered it with a wire cage. The peppers aren't fully ripened yet, so I am hoping they survive a few more days outside before I pick them. The guy I bought the plant from said a friend of his who travels to Central and South America tries to bring back seeds from odd peppers and the rat turd pepper is grown from plants that were originally started from a handful of seeds the guy's friend brought back from Central America.

As an aside, when I picked a bunch of habs a few weeks ago I was cutting them in half to save some seeds and put the rest of the pepper into the freezer. I cut up a big pile of them, and my fingers were burning for two days. never again. Next time I'm wearing gloves. :laugh: So today I was putting the seeds away since now they're dry, and I was rubbing the hab seeds from the pepper core, and I could tell my fingers were getting oily. I was just eating pizza and needless to say, I didn't have to add any hot pepper because my fingers added enough. :laugh: At least they aren't burning like a few weeks ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I like many varieties of chili peppers. I like a good jalapeno for flavor, especially if it is a hot variety. Serrano is a good all around chili. I also grow and enjoy cayenne and tabasco peppers. I like habanero, but usually 1 good one diced will be all that a pot of chili needs for the effect. Thai hot peppers are really good added to Thai or Chinese food, and I grow a Hungarian HOT banana pepper that goes with almost anything.
How much difference is there between a "hot" jalapeno and a regular one? The ones I've had don't seem very hot, but then again, like yourself, I've eaten a few habanero chunks in my time, so jalapenos are like eating sweet candy to me. :lol:

I have some friends who won't eat anything with even a touch of heat. I like when they order "hot" wings, and it is basically wings with Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce on them.
 

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How much difference is there between a "hot" jalapeno and a regular one? The ones I've had don't seem very hot, but then again, like yourself, I've eaten a few habanero chunks in my time, so jalapenos are like eating sweet candy to me. :lol:

I have some friends who won't eat anything with even a touch of heat. I like when they order "hot" wings, and it is basically wings with Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce on them.
There is a big of difference between the milder (regular) and hot jalapeno. I love jalapeno flavor, but without the heat, it is definitely lacking something. I won't grow the milder ones, at all.

I know what you mean about the hot wings. I have a recipe for them that uses habaneros and Sriracha Sauce! When I make them this winter, I'll post that up. I don't think they are too hot, but if one is faint of heart, it probably isn't for them! :munch:
 

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And my next question, did you grow the ghost peppers from seed or buy the plants? If from seed, where did you get the seeds? We always grow a bunch of habaneros, and I've been wanting to try the ghosts.
I grew them from plants. The local farm market had them 2 for $2 so I figured why not? I got about 60 peppers total from the 2 plants. More than enough for a pepper that is 400 times hotter than a jalapeño.
 

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I'd have to say the hot jalapenos are my favorite also. I really like fried eggs with jalapenos.
 

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We're probably going to get a good frost tonight, and a hard freeze will be right around the corner so today I was picking probably the last batch of peppers from my garden. I grow a bunch of different varieties, and I try a few new ones every year. One of the new ones we tried this year was the Hot Portugal pepper. It is only around 7000-10000 on the heat index, so it isn't one of the hottest varieties out there, but it is maybe twice as hot as jalapeno peppers. It is also very sweet, and I think at present the Hot Portugal would be my favorite pepper. We've been throwing them in chili, sausage and peppers, and a few other things my wife has made. I also made my own concoction I call "hot corn bread" and I mix in about one whole cut-up Hot Portugal pepper into the mix. A few people I work with had it, and they said I should go hotter, so I want to make another batch and maybe put in three or four peppers.

Here is the pile of the Hot Portugals I picked today:

View attachment 22718

Not only do they taste great, but I think they are one of the neatest looking peppers.
Peppers are so different, that's almost like asking whether you like apples or oranges best. We eat a lot of peppers, for different reasons. I would say in order of preference, it would run something like this: Bell, Anaheim (or Hatch), Sweet Banana, Hot Banana, Jalapeno, Poblano and Peter Peppers. Bell we use for lots of things, including stuffed peppers (I have a killer recipe that I will post later), Anahein for sandwiches, Hatch for breakfast burritios, Banana for everything, Jalapeno for Atomic Buffalo Turds (I also have a great recipe for these), Poblano for Rellenos, and Peter Peppers for everything, like salsa. Peter Peppers are a novelty pepper that we have a lot of fun with...try Googling "Peter Peppers" if you want a picture.

Here's a link to the ABT recipe that I use; except that I cook mine at 250 degrees F for about an hour to an hour and a half, or until the bacon is done.

http://philcase.com/bge/posts/279456.htm

Here's a link to Peter Peppers:

https://www.google.com/search?q=peter+peppers+pictures&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
 

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2LC,

Those Peter Peppers are classic! I may have to look for them next spring.

Today I was cutting up more of the varieties I picked yesterday. Here is the pile of Habaneros.

hab_pep.jpg

I will be wearing nitrile gloves when I cut these up. I learned my lesson. :laugh:
 

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2LC,

Those Peter Peppers are classic! I may have to look for them next spring.

Today I was cutting up more of the varieties I picked yesterday. Here is the pile of Habaneros.

View attachment 22728

I will be wearing nitrile gloves when I cut these up. I learned my lesson. :laugh:
Us pepper eaters have probably all learned that lesson the hard way; and some lessons make more of an impression than others.
 

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How much difference is there between a "hot" jalapeno and a regular one? The ones I've had don't seem very hot, but then again, like yourself, I've eaten a few habanero chunks in my time, so jalapenos are like eating sweet candy to me. :lol:

I have some friends who won't eat anything with even a touch of heat. I like when they order "hot" wings, and it is basically wings with Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce on them.
Back when I was still growing large amounts of organic produce, a family member decided to help out with the ordering of plants. A good portion of all the other veggies I'd grow were started from seeds in one of the greenhouses. Decided to just order the pepper plants instead. The family member wanted me to try out some plants from a different source. They thought they were just regular jalapenos. Well, when the plants got big and tall and started producing like crazy, I figured we should try some. Good thing only a small patch was planted with that variety. Hottest jalapeno I ever ate. And I love jalapenos, but not that kind of hot.

Tried giving them away to some local hispanic people and even they said they were too dang hot. :lol:
 

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Back when I was still growing large amounts of organic produce, a family member decided to help out with the ordering of plants. A good portion of all the other veggies I'd grow were started from seeds in one of the greenhouses. Decided to just order the pepper plants instead. The family member wanted me to try out some plants from a different source. They thought they were just regular jalapenos. Well, when the plants got big and tall and started producing like crazy, I figured we should try some. Good thing only a small patch was planted with that variety. Hottest jalapeno I ever ate. And I love jalapenos, but not that kind of hot.

Tried giving them away to some local hispanic people and even they said they were too dang hot. :lol:
They sell a variety in this area called "Tams". They are extremely mild Jalapenos.
 

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Back when I was still growing large amounts of organic produce, a family member decided to help out with the ordering of plants. A good portion of all the other veggies I'd grow were started from seeds in one of the greenhouses. Decided to just order the pepper plants instead. The family member wanted me to try out some plants from a different source. They thought they were just regular jalapenos. Well, when the plants got big and tall and started producing like crazy, I figured we should try some. Good thing only a small patch was planted with that variety. Hottest jalapeno I ever ate. And I love jalapenos, but not that kind of hot.

Tried giving them away to some local hispanic people and even they said they were too dang hot. :lol:
Too bad you didn't have me on the forum back then! I don't think a jalapeno can get too hot for me. Now, I will be cautious with the Ghost pepper, when I get a chance to try it! And it might be the first pepper that I wear gloves to deal with too! :munch:
 
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