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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Most places offer them in steel and aluminum! What’s the difference? (Other than material obviously) Is one better than other? Pros/cons


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I've owned both and I cannot tell any difference. Have aluminum now on the 1025r believe they are 1 1/8" thick. Some take the spacers off during the summer months. With the 54" I can leave mine on year around , once in a while I need to leave tractor in N and just roll the tractor a fraction of a inch.
I was told if I had ordered a 1 1/2 -2" I would not be able to use the right rear gauge wheel on 54" deck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I've owned both and I cannot tell any difference. Have aluminum now on the 1025r believe they are 1 1/8" thick. Some take the spacers off during the summer months. With the 54" I can leave mine on year around , once in a while I need to leave tractor in N and just roll the tractor a fraction of a inch.
I was told if I had ordered a 1 1/2 -2" I would not be able to use the right rear gauge wheel on 54" deck.
So would you just get the less expensive set?


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i have them on both my 1025r and 2038. The ones on the 1025r are steel the ones on the 2038 are factory so I don't know what they are. I would say either metal would work. Main thing is torque them and check them often.
 

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So would you just get the less expensive set?


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I went with aluminum, they are less expensive, at least right now. The way I looked at it, say even if they only lasted 5 years for whatever reason, that's $23 per year each. So if I skip lunch out four times in a years time they are paid for.
 

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Do the aluminum spacers use threads or studs to mount the wheel? If threads do they have steel inserts? My only worry with aluminum would be if they used aluminum threads, that "Might" strip? :dunno:
 

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If I had my choice, I'd choose aluminum for a car or truck (less unsprung weight), and for a tractor, I'd choose steel (more weight ... like wheel weights). The other less important issue like dissimilar metals and corrosion would have some consideration, but not the deciding factor.

The other thing I'd consider is whether hub-centric or wheel bolt/lug-centric. Personally I like hub-centric.

If I were looking for my ideal wheel spacer, it'd be steel-hub-centric.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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I bought mine 3 yrs ago from Motorsport talked with Lenny believe he is the owner.. Have always found mine at proper torque when I check them about once a year. :dunno::dunno:

Been Happy so far with the choice.
 

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My 455 AWS tractors required them for tire chain clearance and they never sold with the rest of the tractors. I later determined the 1025R has the same bolt pattern, so I plan to utilize them at some point on the 1025R. These were the spacers sold by John Deere. They were aluminum, an inch or maybe a bit more thick, hub concentric and no studs. As the spacers threaded holes were drilled/threaded completely through and the wheel attaching bolts nearly as long, I have no concerns about stripped threads. I do apply anti-seize to all the wheel bolts more out of practice, but in this case it should eliminate any dissimilar metals corrosion issues.
 

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Do the aluminum spacers use threads or studs to mount the wheel? If threads do they have steel inserts? My only worry with aluminum would be if they used aluminum threads, that "Might" strip? :dunno:

I have the 2" AL ones on my 3720, the holes are threaded with no inserts. I've never read of an issue, but IF there was they have a lifetime warranty.





 

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Discussion Starter #11
Would rust be a factor? I’ll be plowing in the winter with these. Wouldn’t have to worry about it with the aluminum ones. I Can just picture big rusted wheel spacers in 5 years and need to change tire and it be rusted solid to wheel. May never happen. Idk. But salt has really rusted my sxs and I try to clean it as much as possible in winter.


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Rust on steel, corrosion on aluminum....same but different.

Spray everything down with Fluid Film to help deter either.
 

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I have the 2" AL ones on my 3720, the holes are threaded with no inserts. I've never read of an issue, but IF there was they have a lifetime warranty.





My worry is if someone were to over torque them (inexperienced tech) and strip the threads. Or cross thread them.

I FINALLY had new tires installed on my 1996 Impala SS. When they were done, the counter/sales guy said the guy in the back said your wheel locks are starting to slip. just letting you know. I asked if he used an air impact wrench on them. His answer was yes. I probably rotated the tires over a dozen times and never had a problem, but I used hand tolls and a torque wrench. After 100 miles I checked the torque of all the lug nuts. Sure enough I had a lot of trouble engaging the "key" to locking lug nuts. :nunu::nunu::nunu::nunu: I suspect they are ruined and will be had to remove :banghead:

So my worry would be either stripped or cross threaded holes, ruining the spacer, by an inexperienced guy. Or "that guy" that is always in a hurry and screws things up.

I know you would never have any problems. Very nice looking spacers!!!
 

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If I were to get them, they would have to be hub centric, holes drilled the same as the hub with longer wheel bolts, but able to be screwed to the axle with a retaining bolt. That is the best and only way I'd use them. Hey Kenny, new idea?
My 455 AWS tractors required them for tire chain clearance and they never sold with the rest of the tractors. I later determined the 1025R has the same bolt pattern, so I plan to utilize them at some point on the 1025R. These were the spacers sold by John Deere. They were aluminum, an inch or maybe a bit more thick, hub concentric and no studs. As the spacers threaded holes were drilled/threaded completely through and the wheel attaching bolts nearly as long, I have no concerns about stripped threads. I do apply anti-seize to all the wheel bolts more out of practice, but in this case it should eliminate any dissimilar metals corrosion issues.
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If I were to get them, they would have to be hub centric, holes drilled the same as the hub with longer wheel bolts, but able to be screwed to the axle with a retaining bolt. That is the best and only way I'd use them. Hey Kenny, new idea?

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Maybe I mistook the terminology, I had assumed "hub concentric" meant the center hub carried the load, not the wheel studs.
 

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Maybe I mistook the terminology, I had assumed "hub concentric" meant the center hub carried the load, not the wheel studs.
Yes, that is exactly what it is. The center ring protrudes out into the next piece (wheel or spacer) and carries the load. I am saying that with my arrangement the only bolts to check are the actual lug bolts for the wheels. No need to remove the wheel to check the spacer to the axle, that holds the wheel to the axle. Then the only thing limiting the thickness on the low side is the actual hub ring depth. You could have half inch spacers if you wanted, with no fear of bolt strip out, because it is secured to the axle, not the aluminum or steel spacer. The spacer just becomes the meat, like over in the samwich thread. :hide:

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