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I couldn't find the answer to this question in the archives so here goes.
JD 3032e with five ft brushhog
Hilly property makes the JD feel tippy.
Putting wheel spacers and ballast on rear (2-3" not sure yet)
If I ballast and space the rear wheels do i need to do the same for the front, and, if so, do the spacer thicknesees need to be the same?

Hope everyone has a safe Memorial Day
Respect to our departed heroes!
 

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Spacers on the front will make little difference in stability since the front axle pivots, at least not till the pivot stops are reached anyway. Add them to the rear only IMHO unless you need clearance for front chains.
 

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Spacers on the front will make little difference in stability since the front axle pivots, at least not till the pivot stops are reached anyway. Add them to the rear only IMHO unless you need clearance for front chains.
What Kenny said, and even then I wouldn't run them year around.
 

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Everything Kenny said and I would add loading the rear tires with fluid and/or wheel weights. Have fun and be safe!
 

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What Kenny said, and even then I wouldn't run them year around.
I have the JD factory front spacers on my 2720. They are about 1" or so. I put them on when I bought the tractor 5 years ago to allow for front tire chains and I leave them on full time. There's no way I would go to the trouble of taking them on and off each season. Not only would that be a huge PITA but I doubt the threads on the hubs would stand for the repeated use.
 
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I think he means the chains year around...

I've thought about rear spacers but never did it and don't think I will. My property is on an slope and I've been slowly reclaiming the land from blackberries and other brush. I had the tires loaded when I bought it and I haven't had any issues. Yes it feels tippy but I go slow and keep the loader low and the brushhog low as well. If you start to feel uncomfortable, then change the angle of attack so to speak. I've found it's easier and more comfortable to start at the bottom and back into it especially if you don't know what's in there. Also beware if the ground is uneven and you cross the axles up (when you only have the two opposite tires on the ground) the tractor will coast down hill a little until you get all fours back on the ground. Scared the crap out of me the first time. Most recent'y I've cleared about a 1/4 of an acre all on a steep slope. Took about 3 days. Add in old stumps that you can't see and it gets fun.

It's steeper than it looks in the photo...

Natural environment Natural landscape Vegetation Land lot Tree
 
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