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I bring this question here because I was watching a ChuckE2009 youtube video yesterday and in the comments a lot of people were saying his life would be much simpler if used a cultipacker. So of course I started googling cultipacker and immediately become intrigued.

Right now I'd say I'm a gardener and just do small areas with my 3pt rototiller. If I went bigger, would a cultipacker make sense? I would imagine I'd stop using the rototiller at that point and start using a disc because of the time it would take? There may be a lot of variables here that I'm not even aware of but what I'm looking for is the procedure. First you should do this, then this, and so on.

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Cultipackers are often used behind seed drills to make sure the seed has good contact with the soil. Good for large areas. For small areas the back side of a rake works fine. The
 

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Cultipacker or roller

After 22 years of wishing we had a 3 pt hitch to pull some dirt toys with, we picked up our 1023e, then a wagon load of old implements to play with. The soil is mostly red clay, and some of it has never self-seeded as much as the rest of the place. This year we’ve turned dirt in two of the worst bald spots. The disc is tweaked and wracked from abuse, but I've got it at least partially functional, so we did a half decent job in one patch, then tried the plow. This is backwards, but I’m being careful about horsing my new toy too much. The plow will do fairly well, but I’m going to ask Tyler ((the plow guy) if I could move down to a 14” share instead if the 18” that’s on it now.
The other patch has irrigation, city water, and a phone line running through it, and not nearly as deep as they should be, so no plow work there. I am going to seed the two pieces this year, and the one step I was advised to do for good results is running a roller or cultipacker for seed contact with the soil. I’d like to have the cultipacker for its cold-busting capabilities, but can’t justify it just yet. So, I went with a 48” poly roller. If I get lucky and grow something worth having I might spring for a cultipacker next year. $200 for a roller v. $1050 for a cultipacker. Of course the local sales pages haven’t turned up a used cultipacker yet.....until just after I buy a new one I suppose....
This piece will get more work soon, then planted and irrigated. The other piece has no irrigation, so I’m thinking of planting it in the fall.
 

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Jason - Are you intending to use the cultipacker in the garden?

Longhandle - Looks good. I'm gonna redo much of our yard once I am done with the other projects. I have been keeping my eye out for a used one as well.

The smaller 60 to 72 inches ones aren't very prevalent. I have been thinking about finding an old one left out in an old field that I can buy for scrap to get the disc's. I could probably cut down a big ag size packer and make several smaller residential ones.

My wife wonders why I always take the back roads.....
 

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Looking backward in time

We used to use a cultipacker frequently. I think there's still one stuck somewhere in a shed but would have to look to make sure. The reason we discontinued use is everything around us is almost all no till.

When we plowed, a cultipacker was used behind a disk if we had a) lots of large clods that needed to be broken up or b) if the soil was too puffy and needed to be a more uniform density. We avoided A if at all possible by not plowing when it was too wet but sometimes you just have to go when you can.

Eventually we moved from the cultipacker to a rolling harrow behind the disk. It did much the same job but was lighter, easier to pull and folded for transport.

The only time I can remember using a cultipacker by itself was broadcast sowing a cover crop. That was rare as normally we used a drill even for a cover crop.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Jason - Are you intending to use the cultipacker in the garden?
I could see expanding in the future depending on how we like this gardening thing. We may put a pumpkin patch or sun flowers in this year yet, but I really could see doing a larger area of sweet corn. We have a 2 acre field to experiment with.
 
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A tiller will chew up everything, I like that fact that it usually shuts down the weeds if you can put mulch down between your rows. Also, you can make a buck or two tilling for other people. I see a cultipacker being used for lawns and food plots.
 
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Were close to Tilling up our garden again for the season. These are last years pictures but it will look the same again this year. There is a lot of our compost in the dirt put in it over the last 23 years! DSCF4229.JPG DSCF4235.JPG 100_1146.JPG I do it with a 1950's Era Troy-Built Roto-Tiller Walk Behind.
 

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A couple years ago I converted 15 acres of corn/bean fields into horse pasture. It took me several days to roto-till the fields with my 4066R and 6 ft tiller. I bought $$$ of fescue and orchrard grass seed and broadcast the seed on to the freshly tilled dirt. Then, lucky for me, my father-in-law said I needed to cultipack it. He let me borrow his 12 ft cultipacker. When that seed germinated, you could see the rows where the cultipacker ridges had pushed the seed down!

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