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Not too far off topic with this question I hope:
Where do you do your welding?
Outside? Separate building away from house? Garage? I would like to take a similar course as the OP and get started, but all I've got is an attached garage, and snow outside 1/2 the year.


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I agree, this is worthy of a thread by itself.

I weld in my shop. Just be careful of the fire hazard. :good2:
 

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Depends, Mig makes a lot less smoke than stick welding. I wouldn't really recommend stick welding in an attached garage if you are married. In any case a good exhaust hose/fan is worth considering for your own health if you plan to stick weld very much. Be very careful with flammables. All types of welding requires a shield of inert gas around the arc. If you weld outside you need wind shields. - a retired pipe welder
 

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I have my welding equipment setup in the garage on a small section of wall between the two garage doors. For the most part I end up welding in the driveway right in front of the garages but if the weather isn't cooperating I just open the doors and weld inside the garage. If it's really cold, I do all the setup with the doors closed and then open them for the actual welds.
 

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Fair weather welder, my welding table is in back of my shop outside.
My shop is too dang crowded to weld inside.

Always figure the absolute max size you will ever need for a shop, than double it.:banghead:
 

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OUTSIDE for me. Flux core MIG (oxymoron) and stick. I have one of those Miller portable welding tables. With that and my generator I take the sparks to where the work is. :)
 

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OUTSIDE for me. Flux core MIG (oxymoron) and stick. I have one of those Miller portable welding tables. With that and my generator I take the sparks to where the work is. :)
How big is the welder and the generator? Do you see any disadvantages to the setup like undue wear and tear in the generator or poor welds from the welder?

My welding mentor told me that seperate welder/granny setups were ill advised and that if I wanted to go that route to get a welder generstor combo like a Miller Bobcat or the like as they were built and tuned to that duty whereas individual machines were not which would only lead to problems with one, or both 😬
 

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How big is the welder and the generator? Do you see any disadvantages to the setup like undue wear and tear in the generator or poor welds from the welder?

My welding mentor told me that seperate welder/granny setups were ill advised and that if I wanted to go that route to get a welder generstor combo like a Miller Bobcat or the like as they were built and tuned to that duty whereas individual machines were not which would only lead to problems with one, or both ��
Good questions.

I am a home user and do occasional repairs and a small fab job now and then. I have a 110V Hobart Handler 140 MIG and a Longevity 250A inverter-based stick welder. Most of my welding is via AC mains. However, I have done a fair amount of stick welding using my Honda 6500W inverter generator with the inverter stick welder. I can get right around 200 amps of stick before my generator starts to complain. This is more than adequate for the thickness of material I am usually dealing with. I noticed no difference in my stick welder when using it on the generator.

I would not advocate this setup if you weld a lot. For me, not having a shop, it works fine. I do not require much duty cycle.

I do mostly stick work because my Handler 140 is very inadequate. I bought it back before I had a 220V line and it worked fine for a few projects but I need a real MIG welder that runs on 220V.

I've been looking at a portable multi-process machine. Something like the Miller Multimatic or ESAB Rebel. That would give me 110/220V stick/MIG/TIG in something I can easily carry around when needed.
 

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Garage or outside, when in the garage I use a fan to vent the fumes. In winter like above I do all my setup with the door closed then open about a foot with the fan pulling the air out when do the actual welding.

I've got a bullet heater so I can heat the garage back up after I close the door pretty quickly.
 

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I would weld outside (I have 50 foot (ground) and 75 foot leads for the welder),,,
but, it is too hard to move the welding table!! :flag_of_truce:



So,, mostly,,, the welding leads stay coiled and hanging on the welder,,,
 

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Either in my auto repair shop or under the old "welding shed" beside my OLD shop which is located at my house. Also have a Miller Bobcat for work in the field and it doubles as an emergency generator for my house.
 

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I also do ''fair weather'' welding.. Outside of my garage..
I have an older Miller Bobcat portable.. And a 120V flux core wire for small jobs and to tack with..

I am going to have to break down and buy a small piece of plate to make a table to do thing on..
Plywood on saw horses or a Work Mate bench doesn't work out well at times..

Other than that my only other major tools are a good floor model drill press..
And a Milwaukee portable band saw..
These do everything I need... So far....

Take care..
 

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Where do you weld?
As far as the leads can reach.


Just kiddn'. :laugh:

I usually weld just outside my shop door(open air/weather permitting). I started building a 4'x4', one inch thick fab table last summer. I used four 6" hydraulic cylinder barrels for legs(32" tall). Leg bracing is needed to complete. It will be located just inside, between my 2 shop doors.
 

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All I have at home is a little stick welder. I try to weld outside as much as is reasonably possible. Because smaw puts out so much smoke, only small jobs and quick fixes which will take less than one electrode can be done with the door shut. Days that are too cold to have the door open are too cold to weld. :good2:
 

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Winter I weld in my shop unless I can't fit it inside. Nice weather I weld outside. I have 220 outlets by my front and rear overhead doors, and a 30' extension cord made up to extend outside if needed. I also have a big enough portable generator that will power my mig and stick and powers house when we are out of power. Welding table inside and one outside. Being on a farm we weld were ever we have to :lol:. Have the luxury of really having 3 shops, some family lives on the farm and we each have a shop that are heated at each house.
 

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Right now I weld nowhere. :laugh:

Back in TN I had a 30X40 fab shop with a Miller 252 and a concrete pad outside where I could roll the welder out for things that wouldn't fit through the shop door.

Now I have a two car garage with two vehicles in it, and no welder. Looking at a new to me welding rig before long, and then will probably be doing a lot of work outside.
 

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I weld on one of the motorcycle lift tables with the door closed to keep the shielding gas from blowing away.
Then raise the 16Ft. door open partway, open the man door for cross ventilation and throw the ventilation fan on to air it out.
 

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I've got some 50' leads on my old Lincoln 250 IdealArc. It sits at the back of the barn. When I weld I do it just inside the overhead door and usually setup a fan to blow the smoke & fumes outside. Usually use it to build up and hard face the teeth on my backhoe bucket but also an occasional fab or repair job.
 

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I have a 135 Lincoln MIG & an old 180 amp Marquette stick: Pictures 2015 004 (4).JPG 20-25' cables on the stick, most of my welding is done outside the gravel floored shed.
 
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