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Discussion Starter #1
Imagine the FEL moved right about 4 inches, so the 'heel' lines up with the angled tab.
I am thinking just 2 welds - along the angled tab and the heel of the 'shoe' , and then the second weld across the leftmost edge and the square tubing. Maybe adding a plate on the side in the middle. (The other side doesn't line up with the square tubing)
This will also put the pivot point as low on the SSQA as possible (which seems okay?) and gives me clean edges to weld. welding the sides would need an extra plate because of the curved edges don't really giet the metal close enough together.

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I am trying to understand what is moving 4" but don't quite get it yet. If you were to weld like you say where it is, it would be strong enough IMO.

I would try to keep an open area where the attachment lock pin goes through so it does not fill up with mud and crap.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Like this:

753195
 

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That's what I though, then somehow confused myself looking at the center piece thinking the angle tab was in the way. Sorry. What your thinking is what I would do. It does create a pocket for stuff to pack in around the locking pin. However the reason I thought of that is because that is how my bobcat is designed. As long as you have access to the top to wash it out and flush it through the bottom holes it is manageable.

Moving it down will certainly help with access to the arms to lock the pins in place as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So here is what some of my ugly welds look like:
753679
 

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Sooo.... A wire feed weld with NO GAS..?

Or just one with Not Enough power/Amps..?

Looks iffy.at best...Things will get ugly if one side lets go with a load of anything in the bucket/forks.

I'd Gently try things out to see if your up/down placement is correct.
Check dump/curl......Then get the Grinder out and remove most or all of whats there and try again.

What type of welder did you use for this project?
 

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I see lots of tack welds....

Probably shouldn't have painted it, more so if that is MIG. It is more fussy when it comes to making good welds to things like paint, rust and such. If it was MIG welding, was it done outside? Even if you have gas and the flow rate is set right, if there is a wind, it can blow it away and you can have issues. Could also be wrong settings. As they say, this is what a grinder is for.

I would get some scrap steel and do some practice and clean it up and hit it again and you should be good.

When I first got my MIG welder I had some scrap T Posts from some fencing we removed. I use that to practice on running beads back and forth and stacking them. I then used a port-a-band to cut it and look for penetration as well as welding them back together.

Don't get discouraged, take some time and burn some wire or sticks on some scrap steel and you can get it dialed in. Also, some of it looks like you were having a hard time finding where to weld. Do you have an Auto Darkening Helmet? They are not that expensive now and so much better than the old dark helmets that you can't see anything until there is an arc.

Here is my first weld on that old T Post. I took my time and practiced. It does help that the sound you want is like frying bacon and I sure do like fried bacon so I know that sound well.

 

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Probably shouldn't have painted it, more so if that is MIG.
Definitely shouldn't have painted it, however it doesn't look like MIG. It looks like a 110v flux core. Just ropey boogers sitting atop the base metals.

Forget helmets and other new tools, we're at fundamental knowledge. OP has none. Welding is a science, and helmets don't change the science.
 

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Definitely shouldn't have painted it, however it doesn't look like MIG. It looks like a 110v flux core. Just ropey boogers sitting atop the base metals.

Forget helmets and other new tools, we're at fundamental knowledge. OP has none. Welding is a science, and helmets don't change the science.
It is hard to say with 100% certainty. I mainly mentioned the helmet because some of the welds look like they were way off from the joint that was intended to be welded. That looks like what I would do when I had a stick welder and an old style dark helmet. I would flip down and try and find the stick to the joint to be welded and I would be all over the place. The new helmets allow you to see where you need to be. Sure that doesn't fix a welder with not enough amps or maybe a welder big enough but set up with the wrong settings but it helps get you in the right spot. I agree the other issues still need to be addressed but determining what the correct settings should be but it is a start. The settings can be fixed. It isn't hard to determine the thickness of the material being welded and what the correct settings should be. Also if the welder is even capable of doing it.

Everyone makes mistakes, knowledge can be learned, I am just trying not to discourage the OP. I probably sucked the first time I rode a bike..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yes, I know that my welding needs impreovement. some welds are much better (NOT SHOWN :))
It is MIG with gas and a 240 v welder. The worst welds are on the side there, where there is like a 1/4 to 1/2 inch gap that I was trying to fill. the places where the metal butts together have much better looking beads on them, some I believe you guys would approve of. I wasn't even going to try to fill the big gaps but someone at work thought I should, so I tried. I understand about heat penetration, and how to look for it. Most of the metal invovled here is 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch.
 

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I do admit that I brought the welder manual inside so I can read it again and dial in better settings, which I know were just what I cranked into it to try and make it hotter - but that was after the fact.

I do have the fundamental knowledge of welding, I just lack lots of needed experience, and this is certainly giving me experience.
Keep the suggestions and help coming! I have a thick enough skin :)
 

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Wholly shiz, dem welds.
 
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Looks like an older weld broke and you have re alligned it and re welded it? Maybe before you twist anything else up, you should grind off those vertical filler welds and the weld it on a hotter setting
 

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Yes, I know that my welding needs impreovement. some welds are much better (NOT SHOWN :))
It is MIG with gas and a 240 v welder. The worst welds are on the side there, where there is like a 1/4 to 1/2 inch gap that I was trying to fill. the places where the metal butts together have much better looking beads on them, some I believe you guys would approve of. I wasn't even going to try to fill the big gaps but someone at work thought I should, so I tried. I understand about heat penetration, and how to look for it. Most of the metal invovled here is 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch.
In a way welding is kind of like doing sheetrock, the amount of time and effort you put into the prep work will pay off in the end. If you have a 1/4 gap, don't expect the primer and paint to cover it. You will have a wall with a big gap still in the end.

A 1/4 - 1/2 gap is pretty substantial and I wouldn't have tried to bridge that gap. Did you investigate why you had a gap like that. Looking at your earlier photo I see this.

753731


Was this cleaned up so that you had good metal to weld to? It looks like old welds just hanging there from when the original (I think it was JDQA) was cut off. Also the square tubing on the SSQA is painted black, you should hit that with a grinder, at least a wire wheel to clean off the paint. MIG welding is well known for not doing well with dirty steel (paint, rust and such) and doesn't like outdoor welding as your shielding gas can blow away. It likes clean metal which is why I stated earlier that painting it wasn't a good idea. Not until it is welded good. Stick style ARC welding is more forgiving in terms of outdoor and dirty/rusty metal but still won't bridge a 1/4" much less a 1/2" gap. I just suck at ARC welding. It is like trying to sign your name but hanging on to the wrong end of the pen. That is where the grinding and prep work come in. Get the fitment right first and then weld. No matter what style welding you are doing, that is key.

As for the manual. Most welders have a door you can flip open where your wire reel goes. They do this because manuals get left in the office or get lost. Mine has a welding chart that explains not only metal thickness to get the Amp setting but also the feed rate on the wire. Another thing to note is many MIG welders ship with Flux Core wire. They are set up for this. If you get gas and switch to solid core wire, you often have to reverse the polarity of the welder. I know I had to do this. This is also covered under the cover of the welder on the data plate as well as in the manual.

There are a lot of little things like this that can get you. I will say I have a Hobart 190 and I can't weld 1/2" steel. I might be able to do 1/4" but I don't know that it is even big enough for that. I can get away with a little more than the data plate because I run 100% CO2 rather than the more common CO2/Argon mix gas. 100% CO2 spatters more but gets better penetration. When I switched to 100% CO2 I also replaced the cheap regulator with a flow meter. Either way 1/4" steel would really be pushing my little welder. I do have a stick welder that I could go to if I had something 1/2".
 
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Stick style ARC welding is more forgiving in terms of outdoor and dirty/rusty metal but still won't bridge a 1/4" much less a 1/2" gap.
Lay a hardened bolt in the gap.
 
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