Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Considering purchase of Versa Turf tires to be less aggressive on my lawn. Called dealer and parts department not familiar with them. Called me back after a half hour with a price $90 per tire more than on line delivered. Also found out they do not install tires even if they sell them. Local shop that does my truck tires says they can’t do them and suggested a Co-Op 35 miles away.

Where do others get tires mounted for their series 1 tractor?

Also can they save the liquid fill and reuse it in new tires?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,842 Posts
It sounds like the Co-Op may be your best option. You need a place that deals with farm and implement tires and has the equipment to handle the liquid ballast.

My brother just went through this trying to get an inner tube replaced and was surprised to find that none of the tractor dealers in the area can or wants to deal with tires - except for one place that quoted a laughable high price. He eventually found a place about 40 miles away that specializes in agricultural tires. They were able repair the tire while he waited and pump the liquid in and out for about 1/2 the price quoted by the original place.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,827 Posts
Do a Google search on commercial tire service centers in your area. I'm in the same boat and found a place some 30 miles south of me. No one else wants to touch them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,073 Posts
Where are you located? Suggest you find a small tire shop. I have two (2) within five (5) miles of my PA farm. They handle tires for cars, trucks, tractors, trailers, ATVs, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
Buy some tire irons and a liquid transfer pump and get to it! Once you get the technique down they’re usually not that hard to do once you get the bead broken loose. Or order new rims and just mount the new tires. Sell your old takeoffs on FB Marketplace or Craigslist to recoup cost of rims.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,558 Posts
Buy some tire irons and a liquid transfer pump and get to it! Once you get the technique down they’re usually not that hard to do once you get the bead broken loose. Or order new rims and just mount the new tires. Sell your old takeoffs on FB Marketplace or Craigslist to recoup cost of rims.
No Way, been there done that. Some things are best hired done. :ROFLMAO: We have a place up the road that does them cheap enough. I roll them off the trailer and they roll them on all done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Buy some tire irons and a liquid transfer pump and get to it! Once you get the technique down they’re usually not that hard to do once you get the bead broken loose. Or order new rims and just mount the new tires. Sell your old takeoffs on FB Marketplace or Craigslist to recoup cost of rims.
I do motorcycle tires so have spoons and a bead breaker. How do you access inside the tire with pump to remove liquid? How is is reinstalled?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
I do motorcycle tires so have spoons and a bead breaker. How do you access inside the tire with pump to remove liquid? How is is reinstalled?
The liquid can be pumped in/out through the valve stem. There is a special fitting you can buy that screws onto the valve stem (with the valve core removed) and then a garden hose fitting attaches to that. https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/slime-air-water-adapter-kit-with-bleeder-valve

I’ve done a few sets of new tractor tires on my Ford 8N and Farmall Cubs. The Ford I bought new rims since the old ones were badly rusted. I’ve done quite a few garden tractor tires too. Hydraulic log splitter stands in for a bead breaker, but don’t plan on reusing a tire after that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
No Way, been there done that. Some things are best hired done. :ROFLMAO: We have a place up the road that does them cheap enough. I roll them off the trailer and they roll them on all done.
How heavy to manhandle with liquid inside? Was thinking I’d put tractor on trailer and let them remove tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The liquid can be pumped in/out through the valve stem. There is a special fitting you can buy that screws onto the valve stem (with the valve core removed) and then a garden hose fitting attaches to that. https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/slime-air-water-adapter-kit-with-bleeder-valve

I’ve done a few sets of new tractor tires on my Ford 8N and Farmall Cubs. The Ford I bought new rims since the old ones were badly rusted. I’ve done quite a few garden tractor tires too. Hydraulic log splitter stands in for a bead breaker, but don’t plan on reusing a tire after that.
Thanks for the info. Hydraulic splitter??? How tough are the beads to break? They are tube type tire correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
Thanks for the info. Hydraulic splitter??? How tough are the beads to break? They are tube type tire correct?
Sometimes they come off relatively easy. If they’ve been on there for 40 years or more and have some rust, that’s a whole different ballgame. I just use the splitter because that’s what I have. Old tractor tires are tube type. New tractors generally have tubeless tires. You can tell by looking at the valve stem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,773 Posts
I do motorcycle tires so have spoons and a bead breaker. How do you access inside the tire with pump to remove liquid? How is is reinstalled?
If you do motorcycle tires you can do these. How do you do the MC tires, just spoon? That is kind of rough. I use a modified HF tire changer with the Motorcycle Tire Adapter. You just need the base HF Tire Changer for tractor tires. I have changed mine with it no problem. If they are fluid filled though that would be a bear to get them up on a changer unless drained like mentioned before. I would drain them through the valve stem. Then refill the same way.

This makes tire changing so much easier. I have been doing it for years ever since a local shop pissed me off by sitting with my wheels and new tires for close to 2 weeks. They kept saying they were just too busy and would say tomorrow. One day I stopped in 45 minutes before posted closing time. All the motorcycles they have outside during business hours had all been put away and the doors locked. I called the next day and asked if they were done. No too busy. I told them I would be by that afternoon to pick them up. They all of a sudden had time to do it when I told them I stopped by the day before and everyone was gone. I informed them to not touch my property and I would be by to pick it up. Went to HF and bought the stuff to change them myself and modified it to not damage the rims. So much easier than just spoons. Even mounting car tires on motorcycle rims.

Invest $80 and do your MC tires much faster.



Here is a pic in action mounting a car tire on one of my motorcycles.

774212
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,567 Posts
I dropped off my tires and wheels at a local AG tire shop at noon. They called at 4pm and said "All ready for pick up". I ran out there before they closed and the young lad who did the work loaded the tires and wheels in my vehicle. I gave him a $20 and thanked him. The bill for the store was $67 for the mounting and dismounting.

No way I would mess with those for $67. Just some things best left to those who do it professionally. The smaller tires can be stubborn. Also, my tires have a "sealant" product in them to self seal any punctures, etc so I don't have to deal with a flat when plowing or otherwise need my tires. The stuff works. You can also use their wheel ballast product which adds the weight AND seals the tire for punctures up to about 1/4" if I recall.

My tires are NOT loaded for ballast by my choice, they just contain the sealant. And the stuff works.


Make sure to use a wheel position aid such as a long bolt which is the same threads as the wheel bolts with the head cut off the bolt. Aligning the wheels on the hubs and getting the bolts started is a little tricky. The wheel positioner makes it much easier.

We have had a couple of threads lately on GTT about messing up the threads in the hubs by cross threading or using and impact to start the bolts and damaging the threads. The wheel positioner helps hold the wheel so its MUCH easier to get the bolts started.

The wheel positioner is simply a long bolt the same threads as the wheel bolts. Cut off the head of the bolt and then thread it into one of the hub threads. SLide the wheel over the bolt shank and center it on the wheel. Hand start the other wheel bolts until they are well into the threads before you use any impacts or other tools or you might wish you hadn't used a power tool.....................

Remember, unless you are running wheel spacers, your front and rear wheels are using wheel bolts and not lug nuts on studs. Getting the bolts started on the back wheels can be difficult while keeping the wheel centered on the hub, etc. Just be careful. If they are loaded when going on, they are MUCH heavier and more likely to boooger up a thread...........
 
  • Like
Reactions: Treefarmer

·
Premium Member
1025R, '30 Ford, '08 Range Rover Supercharged, '63 MGB, '92 300ZX twin turbo, '73 Courier 2.3 turbo
Joined
·
380 Posts
There is a good utube on how to DYI with windshield washer without the aid of a pump, it is on a kubota though ")
Les Schwab Tire stores do tractor tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
I contacted my JD dealer and they mount tires. Apparently John Deere now has the wheel and tire combo available mounted with the Versa Turfs. Big bucks! o_O

Rear set BXX10270 is 488.40

Front set is BXX10271 at 355.30
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,773 Posts
There is a good utube on how to DYI with windshield washer without the aid of a pump, it is on a kubota though ")
I filled my tires with washer fluid. Bought a few cases of the winter grade in the spring when they had them on clearance.

I used my tire changer above to break the bead on one side, then put the tire on my motorcycle lift so I wasn't working on the ground. Used a big bolt that I wrapped in tape to stuff it between the tire and rim to hold open a gap and started dumping in the fluid until it started leaking out. Got out an air chuck and set the bead. Lowered it down to the ground and did the next one.

The only problem I had was I didn't buy enough washer fluid. I had to go back to the store for another case. I think the tires on my X585 took about 14-15 gallons if I remember. I had bought 2 cases of 6 thinking that was enough.

The only problem with this is that it would be a pain to try and get the fluid out to reuse it. For that I would go with that adapter that goes on the valve stem.

I think it is one of these.

 

·
Chief Stick-picker-upper
Unpredictable Disposition
Joined
·
13,610 Posts
Most commercial dealer have Road Service. They'll come out to your place a dis-mount/mount the tires for you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PJR832

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,218 Posts
Most commercial dealer have Road Service. They'll come out to your place a dis-mount/mount the tires for you.
That's how we do it. We have two tire shops that do Ag about 30 miles away in either direction, both come to us and it's just shop rate plus materials, and cash will usually get you a break.
I've been reading this thread, never realized that this is a common problem in some areas.
 
  • Like
Reactions: flyweight
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top