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Discussion Starter #1
I know it’s still August, but winter/snow come quick in the Colorado Rockies at 7,500’.
This is my first snow season with my 1025R and JD Quick Hitch 54” Snow Blade.
My driveway is asphalt > 130+’ to the road > With 6 concrete pads in front of my three car garage.
Early winter (SEP-DEC) - We get light/dry/fluffy snow.
Late winter (JAN-APR) - We get heavy/wet snow.

I want to put a BLADE EDGE on my new snow blade - Both to protect it - And to provide the best snow removal.
There are several choices I’ve heard about: One from HEAVY HITCH - And two from ARTILLIAN.
From HEAVY HITCH:
A reversible heavy duty UHMW cutting edge replacing the standard mild steel wear bar, M75674, used on John Deere snow plows.
From ARTILLIAN:
An ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW) cutting edge.
A reinforced rubber cutting edge - Endorsed/use by Tim Marks (Tractor Time With Tim).

WHAT SHOULD I BUY?
Your experience and expertise are appreciated.
 

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I have a different tractor but the exact same 54" plow. I also use mine on asphalt driveway.

I used teh Artillian cutting edge for the 1st 2 years I had the plow. It works but wore and needed to be flipped for the 2nd year. After years 2 it was done and needed to be replaced.

So I bought the Heavy Hitch cutting edge. I used that 1 winter. Big chunks of the cutting edge broke off while plowing. I had to flip it over mid-season and by the time spring rolled around it was shot.

I ended up buying a 3'x5' stall mat at Tractor Supply for about $40. They are ~3/4" thick. I cut it into 6"x54" strips, drilled holes and have been using those strips since then. I have been flipping it mid-season and then just replace it every fall as I get geared up for the next season. But... at $40 spread out over 6 seasons, It's a better deal than anything else I've run across.
 

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I have 100yards of concrete with the last 20 being gravel. I got a 5foot piece of 3/4 x 4inch piece of heavy duty rubber. Drilled holes down the centerline to attach to the factory blade. Had to buy longer bolts from the hardware store. With a 5foot piece it over hangs 3inches to either side so there's a "cushion" for those tight spaces. Got 4 edges go use before a new pieces of rubber is needed. Just flip it and its new again. The original edge is still good from last year. Also acts as a squeegee for that really wet stuff. Just my option.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Great ideas Guys!

JimR:
What did you cut it with?

Bcross:
Where’d you find/buy that 5’ piece of rubber.
 

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I'm not sure there is a "great" way to cut the stall mats. I clamped mine between 2 pieces of 2"x4" wood and hung it between sawhorses. Then I cut with a utility knife. It takes what must be 50 cuts over and over to finally get through. It seemed like forever. Next time I'm going to try an old blade in my circular saw.
 

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Rubbercal is where I got it. Its listed under the specialty menu



And here's it installed

 

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I just use the rubber edge from John Deere. First one lasted five winters. My driveway is 120’ long and all concrete. I also routinely do at least two of my neighbors driveways which are both asphalt.

I just bought a new rubber edge about an hour ago. The first one actually tore in half at one end so I can’t really flip it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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This has been discussed a few times previously Sullybear is the resident guidance giver on this top.

Take a look at rubberwearstrip.com as they make a durable yet flexible edge out of conveyor belt material. I've run the factor rubber edge previously and was lightly impressed by it but I knew I wanted something that was a little stiffer and wore better.

I sold my 54" JD blade and picked up the CTA 66" plow blade with their wearable poly edge. On any perfectly flat and smooth paved surface the solid edge is probably perfect. What I really liked was how the rubber edge acted like a squeegee. As a result after I was done cleaning up the wet driveway needed a little sunlight and then it was thoroughly dry.

My paved driveway however has some light rutting down the 600' single lane due to compaction below. There are many times where the solid edge won't touch the snow or slush that rained in the 1" tire ruts. I will be ordering a conveyer belt wear edge from rubberwearstrip.com for use this winter.
 

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Rubbercal is where I got it. Its listed under the specialty menu



And here's it installed

Be careful with the end over hang of the rubber edge past the steel blade. Make sure it's not more than 3" or its very likely to "tear" and it rips flush with the bottom of the blade and becomes a hindrance.

If you use down pressure, you can tear the rubber when back dragging it. Just don't get crazy with the down pressure and you should be fine.

Another friendly tip, use cheap grade bolts to secure the "STRAP" which is the metal plate holding on the rubber edge. NEVER use grade 8 bolts as they can be a real pain to remove. The bolts will get corroded and become very hard to remove. Getting into the snow melt or road salt will cause the corrosion on the hardware.

Also, always have the extra bolt length on the FRONT of the plow, not the rear. As the edge wears down, the extra bolt length on the rear of the blade can make contact with the pavement and not only does it score and damage the asphalt, it can leave rust marks on the concrete. If the extra bolt length is sticking out of the FRONT of the plow blade, none of this happens.

I don't use carriage bolts any longer and just use regular bolts with washers on each side. When tightening with an impact, it pulls the bolt down tight and you really don't need a wrench on the other end of the bolt to secure it. I like to lower the quick hitch down onto jack stands or blocks of wood to keep the blade elevated when I am swapping the edge. Its easier to position it and put on and take off the hardware.

If you buy the rubber material and its not pre-drilled, drill the holes, using the strap as your template, but drill the holes not in the center of the material, but more in the upper 1/3rd of the material. Usually, by time you are ready to flip these rubber edges, they are pretty worn and it best to just replace them. Plus, if you drill in the upper 1/3rd of the rubber edge material, its much longer until you need to flip the edge or replace it.

Look at how much of the rubber flap hangs below your steel plow edge. You don't want the steel plow edge to make contact or it will wear it down. I have seen plows where they wore the bolt holes off the bottom of the metal plow using down force. It's better to wear a $25 rubber edge than a $500 steel plow.

I use cheap bolts and when its time to replace the cutting edge, which for me is more often than most based upon the frequency of plowing, I use my 20 volt impact and snap the bolts off and throw them away and replace them with new when installing a new cutting edge. Its not worth the hassle to try and deal with corroded bolts and nuts, just snap them off, throw them in the trash and install new hardware.

The cheap bolts will hold the cutting edge just like the better bolts as there really isn't much of a load on them when tightened correctly.

Also, be careful about over tightening the strap and it compresses the rubber and causes it to distort and can cause it to wear unevenly.

You will love the rubber plow edge. It scrapes the pavement nice and clean and allows the sun to help keep the surface clean. Also, you can push snow onto lawns and grass areas and not damage the surface, where the steel edge will tear the surface up......

I also suggest you keep a spare rubber edge on hand with an extra set of bolts and nuts. Should you tear the edge, which happens with some, especially when the ends hangs past the blade and too much down pressure is used. Once the edge tears, you can't really plow with them and its best to switch it out right then. Otherwise, you have part of the blade making surface contact and part which isn't and it doesn't clear the snow like it should. As cheap as they are, having a spare saves down time and headaches.......
 

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If you buy the rubber material and its not pre-drilled, drill the holes, using the strap as your template, but drill the holes not in the center of the material, but more in the upper 1/3rd of the material. Usually, by time you are ready to flip these rubber edges, they are pretty worn and it best to just replace them. Plus, if you drill in the upper 1/3rd of the rubber edge material, its much longer until you need to flip the edge or replace it.

Look at how much of the rubber flap hangs below your steel plow edge. You don't want the steel plow edge to make contact or it will wear it down. I have seen plows where they wore the bolt holes off the bottom of the metal plow using down force. It's better to wear a $25 rubber edge than a $500 steel plow.

I use cheap bolts and when its time to replace the cutting edge, which for me is more often than most based upon the frequency of plowing, I use my 20 volt impact and snap the bolts off and throw them away and replace them with new when installing a new cutting edge. Its not worth the hassle to try and deal with corroded bolts and nuts, just snap them off, throw them in the trash and install new hardware.

The cheap bolts will hold the cutting edge just like the better bolts as there really isn't much of a load on them when tightened correctly.

Also, be careful about over tightening the strap and it compresses the rubber and causes it to distort and can cause it to wear unevenly.

Sulley,

Do you have any "Strap" material recommendations? I bought a King Kutter type rear blade and the actual blade on it is about 6" wide. I suppose that would work, but it might just be easier to work with something a little thinner? Can you just buy a metal strap and drill through it with regular drill bits?
 
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