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Discussion Starter #1
I know there are probably hundreds of threads on Ken’s Bolt On Hooks. But since I have one of the newer buckets with factory holes, I'm wondering what is a most useful setup before I place an order. In other words, if you could do it all over again, what would you change about your bucket setup? Do you prefer the hooks? Do you prefer the clevis? Do you prefer the hook/clevis back-to-back? Do you utilize the middle section of the bucket or do you find the middle section unnecessary if you have hooks/clevis on the corners?

Just like most of you, my bucket will be used for many different things, and some applications that I have yet to imagine. This is why I'm reaching out to those of you who have lots of time and experience with your buckets and Ken’s Bolt On products. I'm needing to lift stumps into a trailer to be hauled off, so I'm already seeing a good use for either hooks or a clevis. Any thoughts will be appreciated.
 

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Not the right guy

I know there are probably hundreds of threads on Ken’s Bolt On Hooks. But since I have one of the newer buckets with factory holes, I'm wondering what is a most useful setup before I place an order. In other words, if you could do it all over again, what would you change about your bucket setup? Do you prefer the hooks? Do you prefer the clevis? Do you prefer the hook/clevis back-to-back? Do you utilize the middle section of the bucket or do you find the middle section unnecessary if you have hooks/clevis on the corners?

Just like most of you, my bucket will be used for many different things, and some applications that I have yet to imagine. This is why I'm reaching out to those of you who have lots of time and experience with your buckets and Ken’s Bolt On products. I'm needing to lift stumps into a trailer to be hauled off, so I'm already seeing a good use for either hooks or a clevis. Any thoughts will be appreciated.
I'm probably not the right guy to answer this question because I'd use a grapple to lift stumps but if I had to do it using a bucket and KBOH, which I do have on the bucket, I'd probably use a clevis and sling set up vs. a chain. Chain will work well, it's just easier to mess with a sling than a chain because of the weight, as long as you are comfortable getting the length right.

I'd recommend just going ahead and getting the combo hook/clevis set up. It's a few more bucks but then you are done and have the choice to go with either. Unless you are only going to lift light loads, I'd put the hooks/clevis right over the attachment for the lift arms as there's less chance of bending the bucket there, although a center lift point can sometimes be helpful. I would not go to the extreme corners as lifting from one corner only puts a lot of stress on the loader frame, particularly if you are lowering the load a little too quickly and stop it.

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I went with the XL Backing Plate and the Bolt on Clevis set up. I never really used the loaders on my old tractors for carrying bulky items and I think the center mount (for me) will work the best. The clevis allows both chain and nylon strap use.
 
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Nope, one on each side in line with the loader arms or you will bend your bucket.


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I have two hooks. Works well for chain, less good for a strap. I’ve found I use the strap to pickup things more often. Reasons: lighter to move around, less damage to item’s finish. I’d probably go with a clevis if I did it again. I’d just be concerned with it rattling. I also often use the strap because I have my forks installed and it’s easier to wrap the strap around the forks to take up the slack. If I was picking up logs more often and didn’t have forks, then I’d probably use the chain more.


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I'll throw my 2-cents in. I originally went with three hooks and three clevis backing plates but found I never used the center hook. So I replaced it with Ken's 2" receiver hitch and blacking plate which I use all the time. I use the backing plate for the safety chains when towing my landscape trailer. The combo allows me to use chains, straps, oblong rings, you name it. Plus, I use one of Ken's Ball Dogs in the receiver hitch whenever I need to pull or lift something from that position.

I'm not sure what factory holes you are referring to in your new bucket but pretty much figure on drilling holes for whatever you plan to mount. Which of course, is no biggie.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm not sure what factory holes you are referring to in your new bucket but pretty much figure on drilling holes for whatever you plan to mount. Which of course, is no biggie.
The factory holes are only on the newer buckets. Your 2012 didn't come with them. According to Ken, the holes are mounting points when the buckets are shipped with the loaders. In other words, the buckets are mounted directly to the loaders via the two holes. Ken's XL Backing Mounting plate utilizes the two factory holes.
 
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The factory holes are only on the newer buckets. Your 2012 didn't come with them. According to Ken, the holes are mounting points when the buckets are shipped with the loaders. In other words, the buckets are mounted directly to the loaders via the two holes. Ken's XL Backing Mounting plate utilizes the two factory holes.
Correct. I am familiar with the holes in the newer buckets. I guess my point was that other than two existing holes to secure the center backing plate, you are going to be drilling holes. Especially on the left and right positions which is probably the most appropriate spot for hooks and clevis plates.

While Ken's backing plate does use two holes that are already there on newer buckets, it doesn't eliminate the drilling of new holes. You are still drilling the same number of new holes, either 2 or 4 just in the center depending if you go with a hook or hitch. :) Add that to the two on each side for hooks and 2012+ bucket or not you are drilling 6 to 8 new holes.
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I went with the hook/clevis combo, one on each side. I haven't used the clevis yet, but for the small cost, I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

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Discussion Starter #11
Correct. I am familiar with the holes in the newer buckets. I guess my point was that other than two existing holes to secure the center backing plate, you are going to be drilling holes. Especially on the left and right positions which is probably the most appropriate spot for hooks and clevis plates.

While Ken's backing plate does use two holes that are already there on newer buckets, it doesn't eliminate the drilling of new holes. You are still drilling the same number of new holes, either 2 or 4 just in the center depending if you go with a hook or hitch. :) Add that to the two on each side for hooks and 2012+ bucket or not you are drilling 6 to 8 new holes.
:bigthumb:
We are on the same page. I've watched his YouTube videos and seen the install procedures. I was just pointing out the fact that side hooks are not the only option. The XL mounting plate now makes it possible to have something in the middle of the bucket without having to worry about bending the bucket. More options are good, but it also makes the decision process a lot harder, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'll throw my 2-cents in. I originally went with three hooks and three clevis backing plates but found I never used the center hook. So I replaced it with Ken's 2" receiver hitch and blacking plate which I use all the time. I use the backing plate for the safety chains when towing my landscape trailer. The combo allows me to use chains, straps, oblong rings, you name it. Plus, I use one of Ken's Ball Dogs in the receiver hitch whenever I need to pull or lift something from that position.
At what point do you think trailer weight is too much for the bucket/front-end loader? Can we safely move 2,000 lbs., 4,000 lbs., 6,000 lbs.?

Also, do you use a drop hitch for your bucket? It would seem that the receiver hitch mounting location would be high for a trailer, but apparently not. I would love to see a video of this setup in action.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I went with the hook/clevis combo, one on each side. I haven't used the clevis yet, but for the small cost, I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.
I'm almost to that point as well. I just need to decide if I want to do something in the middle of the bucket. I like the hitch idea, I really do, but I need to know what weight capacity we are talking. My dump trailer weighs 4,000 lbs empty. My utility trailer weighs about 3,200 empty, and my travel trailer weighs about 4,800 lbs empty. I would love to be able to move those without having to hookup the truck all the time.
 
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I'm almost to that point as well. I just need to decide if I want to do something in the middle of the bucket. I like the hitch idea, I really do, but I need to know what weight capacity we are talking. My dump trailer weighs 4,000 lbs empty. My utility trailer weighs about 3,200 empty, and my travel trailer weighs about 4,800 lbs empty. I would love to be able to move those without having to hookup the truck all the time.
Its more about tongue weight than the trailer weight, but I've never had the opportunity to due testing for actual specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Its more about tongue weight than the trailer weight, but I've never had the opportunity to due testing for actual specs.
Would you like to take a wild guess at what the loader's tongue weight might be able to safely withstand?

Also, do you know when your NOGA Deburr Set might be back in stock?
 

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Its more about tongue weight than the trailer weight, but I've never had the opportunity to due testing for actual specs.
Kenny is absolutely correct. What you need to be concerned about is tongue weight as the top edge of the bucket has to bear all the weight. My 5x10 landscape trailer only weighs 723 lbs. and even when empty there is a bit of flex on the top edge of my 53-inch bucket. So backing plate or not you need to be conscience of the tongue weight of the trailer.

You also need to be aware of the weight of your tractor vs. the weight of the trailer you intent to push/pull, especially if the area to be traveled is not perfectly level.

Lastly, your loader was primarily designed to lift loads vertically and to push with the strength of the tractor's drive train. When you attach something that weighs several thousand pounds to the bucket you risk the possibility of subjecting the loader arms to horizontal forces beyond what it was designed for.
 

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Lastly, your loader was primarily designed to lift loads vertically and to push with the strength of the tractor's drive train. When you attach something that weighs several thousand pounds to the bucket you risk the possibility of subjecting the loader arms to horizontal forces beyond what it was designed for.
I'm pretty sure the tongue weight on my trailers would be too heavy. And you're right, I don't want to stress the loader arms beyond what it was intended for.

As a side note, I have seen video footage of a 1025R towing a 7,000 pound 20' cargo trailer.

$18k John Deere 1025r w/Heavy Hitch, H120. 7,000 lb load. 20 trailer,John deere 1025r pulling - YouTube
 

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Would you like to take a wild guess at what the loader's tongue weight might be able to safely withstand?
No sir...I'll pass on any guesses-especially publicly :mocking:

Also, do you know when your NOGA Deburr Set might be back in stock?
Should be Friday, I had the wrong date on the website.
 
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I'm pretty sure the tongue weight on my trailers would be too heavy. And you're right, I don't want to stress the loader arms beyond what it was intended for.

As a side note, I have seen video footage of a 1025R towing a 7,000 pound 20' cargo trailer.

$18k John Deere 1025r w/Heavy Hitch, H120. 7,000 lb load. 20 trailer,John deere 1025r pulling - YouTube
That's really not that big of a deal, especially on a level paved surface. It really doesn't take all that much to pull a trailer. Did you ever see those guys on TV pulling an airplane with their teeth? :) If it weren't for the tongue weight I'll bet my X500 garden tractor would pull a trailer like that on level ground. :)

It's too bad you don't know someone with a tongue weight scale. For stability a loaded trailer should have a tongue weight of around 10-15% of the gross weight but that's going to different for moving an empty trailer around your driveway.
 
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I have gotten by well with just the two bucket hooks using chains but I had also purchased a couple of Kenny's slings with oblong rings on them that work quite well with the hooks.
I should install one of his hooks on my backhoe bucket one of these days.
He has a great selection of chain hooks, shorteners etc. that you may look at if you don't have chains constructed yet.
I would also add that I am forced to navigate some extremely muddy areas on my property mostly in the spring and I am in love with his differential lock pedal that he sells.
 
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