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2011 John Deere 2320 HST
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Each year I become continually less tolerant of winter conditions. I currently run the following equipment.

John Deere X300 lawn tractor with a 44" snowblower
John Deere 2320 with a FEL bucket

I've placed a new garage on the property in the place I used to place my snow. My new situation dictates I move all the snow from two areas 30'x100' and 30'X60' to a specific area about 150' away. All gravel driveway. The bucket used to be a good option when I could dump the snow much closer. I've done a lot of researching on the net. I figured some personal experiences are in order.

Northern MN gets 3"-6" commonly per snowfall and many many times many more inches per event for a total of 60" average per year. So I've started looking at the snow pusher.

My questions. Would a 66" snow pusher easily move the snow we get 150' with every push or would I have to take smaller bites? Is a tractor able to make subtle turns of up to 45 degrees with a load of snow in the pusher? Would I be better off utilizing the snow blower to continually blow the snow in front of me until I get it to the woods? Which option would work the best, be most efficient and quickest?
 

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My opinion only, I have a 84 inch pusher and a 48 inch 3 point blower on a 1025r. My pusher is easier and faster most of the time. When you need a snow blower, you NEED a snow blower. With the pusher it pushes easy enough but steering is an issue. I have to pick it up a little to get weight on the front tires or it just goes straight. My situation will tolerate going mostly straight. My blower works good however it works best with deep snow. The more you feed it the farther it throws it. Without being able to blow the snow sideways and just blowing it where you are going that is going to get messy and time consuming. If you even angle the chute off to one side and keep blowing paths you'll end up with a wind row of too much for your blower. Another thing, can you blow in each direction(I assume no) or will you back track to the beginning each time? When the ground is still soft I use my pusher to clear the drives and get the snow near the edge of the grass the if there is a mound I use the blower to scatter it in the yard. I love my blower and don't regret buying it at all but I think the pusher is your best bet. Your mileage may vary

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here is a rough sketch. The “no snow” area is uphill so I don’t want snow melt coming across my driveway making it soft and muddy
Handwriting Rectangle Font Material property Pattern
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
" I have a 84 inch pusher"

How big of a pusher should/could I consider for my 2320? I thought 84" was huge for these smaller tractors. I'd happily go up to 72" if it is functional and doable.
 

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I have used pushers, plows, blowers, and buckets to clear MN self storage driveways and outdoor parking spaces. In general, I would say a pusher is the fastest means to move snow off a surface. If the snow is too deep/heavy sometimes you need to take a smaller bite. Same rules apply to using a bucket. The advantage of a pusher is the high sides and how they self empty when you lift them. However, this makes it hard to build up a pile so you need a lot of room to pile the snow - which is why I use a bucket on my current driveway. I push all the snow to two areas but with a bucket you can lift it higher and create bigger piles if necessary. A snow bucket or pusher should extend 6-12" wider than you tires. I made 78" bucket for my 3033R. I have never felt it was too big but would not want one any wider. They start to get a little unwieldly and I like to keep building repairs to a minimum nowadays. I can also fit it through the garage door easily.

Blowers are great but can be a nightmare with the right wind, aren't real fast. Plows are great if you can wing it off to one side. Almost worthless if you have to push it off an end.
 

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I usually plow the snow off to one side. If it’s getting too deep/high, I’ll hook up the snowblower and clear it off so I can plow again.

If the snow is deep enough, I just go straight to the blower.

You’d have to decide for yourself if that scheme jives with your area or not.
 

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" I have a 84 inch pusher"

How big of a pusher should/could I consider for my 2320? I thought 84" was huge for these smaller tractors. I'd happily go up to 72" if it is functional and doable.
I ended up using the plow blade off my jeep which was 7' then welded 24"X24" steel plates on the ends. Fabbed up some quick connect plates to hook to the loader frame. It was what I had so I used it. I have four drives to plow but they are all paved and my 1025 has no trouble. I don't even run tire chains. I would think 72 would be fine. I get probably 3 to 6 inches in a typical snow storm sometimes just 2.
 

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Blowers are great but can be a nightmare with the right wind, aren't real fast. Plows are great if you can wing it off to one side. Almost worthless if you have to push it off an end.
I would agree! Ruger, I forgot to mention one thing. When I bought the tractor there is 1 thing I wanted with the blower...a cab! I think your 2320 is as big or bigger than a 1025r. I still think 72 inch would be fine
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
So with all that said would bucket wings be a better option as I still have my bucket for snow piling but have “kinda” pusher width? Wings would make my bucket 87” wide.

with that said I’m a huge fan of “the right tool for the job”.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Harvester
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the comments. Thus far I think I’m leaning towards a snow pusher to clear the driveway and then use the blower to blow the pile into the woods
 

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That is a good starting plan and it will evolve as you hit a rhythm with it.

Prior to my 4066R, used a Gator for 8-9 years to plow everything over to the edge of the driveway / parking area and then would occasionally stack with a Deere 317 skid steer since the Gator could only do so much. Over the years my neat Gator plowing job "evolved" to doing a quicker/easier plow job with minimal stacking, and using the 317 more frequently as it was quicker overall and much easier on the Gator. All that to say, it'll take a few snowfalls (or, few years in my case) to hit your groove but what you're starting with seems reasonable.
 

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This is just my opinion. But using a bucket to move snow when there are better more efficient options available, is akin to using an adjustable wrench as a hammer, because it's the easiest tool to reach at the moment.
Yeah you have a bucket, yeah it will work, yeah you could add wings to corral and grab more snow, but it won't ever be the optimal tool for the snow removal job.
It will get ya by. Just depends if the pros outweigh the cons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I fully understand what you’re saying SRG and I couldn’t agree more. However that doesn’t completely help me answer my question.
 

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Yes, a 66" snow push, or even a 60", I'd think would work well on your machine. The larger it is, the harder it will be to turn, when there's more snow in front. You will most likely have to lift the loader a bit to make a turn, putting more weight onto the front wheels. It's something you will get a feel for, as you use it. A gradual sweeping turn, is not difficult to perform. You may find that being able to "pie cut" your turns making them straight lines, while using it, becomes the fastest way to get it done. It's a pretty simple attachment to get the hang of.
Snow pushers are very good, and fast at being able to take snow somewhere, especially at the end of a long run. Speed is your friend, is what I have found using mine.
Check out Express Steel snow pushers on Ebay. USA made in Indiana. Most of their listings have a make an offer feature, and include shipping.

No help with a snow blower. I have an open station, and the thought of getting pummeled by wind blown/thrown snow, doesn't sound good to me.

For what you describe, as average snow falls, and your need to direct where the snow gets piled, it sounds like a snow push would be a good match.

Adjustable shoes, or an adjustable height cutting edge, will prove beneficial going over gravel.
 

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Loader bucket will move a lot of snow compared to the additional price of a dedicated snow removal piece of equipment (i.e. snow thrower). Depends on the typical amount of snow fall and area to be cleared.
Nice thing about a bucket...push as long as possible, then lift and dump off to the side. Then continue.
Last year I bought a used 3pt mounted snow thrower for my 4200. Other than attaching it to move it, it has not been used. I used my walk behind snow thrower twice last winter. I have 100+ yard drive at the farm. In reality I will likely sell the 3pt thrower.

Not an easy decision but you make the call. Everyone's situation/justification is different.
 
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Lots of really good points made already. It really does depend on the property but your drawing is thoughtful and shows you have a plan (great way to start!)

I started with an old used rear blade and FEL 10 years ago on my 2520... then at 2 years in, received a 20 inch snow. That changed everything. I would imagine (Northern MN) that you see 'dumps' like that like fairly often. Also, I have a 1/4 mile lane that has ditches on both sides making it sketchy to operate the FEL without pulling you in. For me, a front SB (for the big dumps) and a GOOD rear blade is the ticket. This 'how to' video was invaluable for me starting out. Spinning a rear blade backwards (bulldozer mode) could be your best friend in clearing your drive.

How To Series

I have found (central Wisconsin) that 80% of my snow work is clearing those 2-6" 'nuisance' snows. The rear blade is THE tool for me. Know there are huge differences in blades! I started with an old, used LandPride blade; it was great! The highly curved moldboard really 'rolled' the snow! It was not QH compatible though and could not offset so I traded it on a Frontier RB2072. I'm a retired JD engineer. It's hard for me to say this but the RB2072 stunk. The moldboard shape is too flat! The snow would just pile up on it and it would NOT unload (it was overwhelmed with anything over a 3" snow). I sold it the next Spring and bought a Rhino 5006. Wow... back to flying through the snow!.. and it easily offsets, QH compatible, great moldboard shape, heavy, and way better build quality.
 

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Each year I become continually less tolerant of winter conditions. I currently run the following equipment.

John Deere X300 lawn tractor with a 44" snowblower
John Deere 2320 with a FEL bucket

I've placed a new garage on the property in the place I used to place my snow. My new situation dictates I move all the snow from two areas 30'x100' and 30'X60' to a specific area about 150' away. All gravel driveway. The bucket used to be a good option when I could dump the snow much closer. I've done a lot of researching on the net. I figured some personal experiences are in order.

Northern MN gets 3"-6" commonly per snowfall and many many times many more inches per event for a total of 60" average per year. So I've started looking at the snow pusher.

My questions. Would a 66" snow pusher easily move the snow we get 150' with every push or would I have to take smaller bites? Is a tractor able to make subtle turns of up to 45 degrees with a load of snow in the pusher? Would I be better off utilizing the snow blower to continually blow the snow in front of me until I get it to the woods? Which option would work the best, be most efficient and quickest?
Have done it both ways since a farmboy many years ago. 10 years bought my first snowblower (front mounted) . Blower is infinitely faster IMHO, especially with a longer driveway-- and less messy too. no tearing up the lawn, etc...
 

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Each year I become continually less tolerant of winter conditions. I currently run the following equipment.

John Deere X300 lawn tractor with a 44" snowblower
John Deere 2320 with a FEL bucket

I've placed a new garage on the property in the place I used to place my snow. My new situation dictates I move all the snow from two areas 30'x100' and 30'X60' to a specific area about 150' away. All gravel driveway. The bucket used to be a good option when I could dump the snow much closer. I've done a lot of researching on the net. I figured some personal experiences are in order.

Northern MN gets 3"-6" commonly per snowfall and many many times many more inches per event for a total of 60" average per year. So I've started looking at the snow pusher.

My questions. Would a 66" snow pusher easily move the snow we get 150' with every push or would I have to take smaller bites? Is a tractor able to make subtle turns of up to 45 degrees with a load of snow in the pusher? Would I be better off utilizing the snow blower to continually blow the snow in front of me until I get it to the woods? Which option would work the best, be most efficient and quickest?
Like your handle ....... great caliber.
 
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