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Discussion Starter #1
My Whirlpool Fridge Freezer has Whirl pooled down the drain. Suddenly the freezer will not stay cold & the Fridge is down also. I checked what I could & the only observation I could make is that the Compressor-Condenser tank (not sure what you call it-but it's the small black tank part) is short cycling for on about a minute & off for about three then back on again, etc. The cooling fan is constantly running I assume due to heat generated.

I see what appears to be a black relay & electrical connection attached to the tank. That's the part that is clicking on & off. At this point I'm thinking either a bad relay, a tank that has lost its Freon or whatever its charged with or some type of thermostat that has failed. Anyone ever have this kind of a failure. I see big bucks ahead. This darn thing is only three years old this March. Is this something I can throw some parts at & get it going or do I need the repair guy. Thanks.

:banghead:
 

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Check to see if the evaporator core is frozen solid. It's the cold one that feeds the inside with cold air. This will stop the flow of air inside making the food warm. Had a fridge with a similar problem. Every time I thawed it all the visible ice was melted or so I thought. After the repair guy removed the white inner liner I discovered this was not the case. The core was still plenty frozen. A wire pulled off the automatic defrost switch causing the problem. When I sold that house I was going to take the fridge with me. Low and behold it started melting my ice cream again (first sign of the problem) so I left it. lol
 

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Check to see if the evaporator core is frozen solid. It's the cold one that feeds the inside with cold air. This will stop the flow of air inside making the food warm. Had a fridge with a similar problem. Every time I thawed it all the visible ice was melted or so I thought. After the repair guy removed the white inner liner I discovered this was not the case. The core was still plenty frozen. A wire pulled off the automatic defrost switch causing the problem. When I sold that house I was going to take the fridge with me. Low and behold it started melting my ice cream again (first sign of the problem) so I left it. lol
Thank you. I will check as much of that line as I can. What gets to me is that the manual for the unit has like zero info in the trouble shooting section. And I also went to Whirlpool on line & had a chat with them but all they offered me was a couple of repair services. I really can't get down on Whirlpool. I've had there stuff for years with no issues. This is the first blow up I have had in over twenty years of Whirlpool appliances. I guess there's a first for everything. And without the right tools & knowing where to look kind of puts me out of luck. Thanks for your advice I will give a look at that line.
 

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Same thing happened to my lg. I assume it was the condenser that died, but in talking to repair guys they all said they generally only last 2-4 years now days due to energy efficiency ratings.
I decided to just get anew one with 5 year extended warranty.
 

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Thank you. I will check as much of that line as I can. What gets to me is that the manual for the unit has like zero info in the trouble shooting section. And I also went to Whirlpool on line & had a chat with them but all they offered me was a couple of repair services. I really can't get down on Whirlpool. I've had there stuff for years with no issues. This is the first blow up I have had in over twenty years of Whirlpool appliances. I guess there's a first for everything. And without the right tools & knowing where to look kind of puts me out of luck. Thanks for your advice I will give a look at that line.
I'm not taking about a line. It's a coil with fins just like the one on the back of the refrigerator. Only smaller and inside the cabinet. You will probably have to remove the doors and all the shelves inside before you can get the big plastic tub out. It will be behind that.
 

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In the quest for energy savings, the compressors got VERY small,,,
yes, they do use VERY little electricity,,, but, the shrinkage of components reduced the units life.

Therefore,, we now buy name-brand, small (~16 cu ft) inexpensive refrigerators.

In three households,,, this has worked out well,,,
yea, no ice crusher,, I will live with that.

I actually measured the electricity consumption,,
the one we have now uses $42 per year of electricity.

It replaced one that used over $200 per year of electricity,,
payback in under 4 years.

It may be cheaper to replace,,, than fix.
 

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In the quest for energy savings, the compressors got VERY small,,,
yes, they do use VERY little electricity,,, but, the shrinkage of components reduced the units life.

Therefore,, we now buy name-brand, small (~16 cu ft) inexpensive refrigerators.

In three households,,, this has worked out well,,,
yea, no ice crusher,, I will live with that.

I actually measured the electricity consumption,,
the one we have now uses $42 per year of electricity.

It replaced one that used over $200 per year of electricity,,
payback in under 4 years.

It may be cheaper to replace,,, than fix.
I have been doing the same with both large and small appliances.

Our kitchen range went out a couple years ago @10 years. The only thing wrong was the circuit board. Well I don't need a circuit board to cook - so I searched high and low and finally found a range that had the dials on it instead of the push button control for the oven. $100 cheaper than the cheapest one with push button controls and I expect it to last a long time - easily replaceable parts.

Our refrigerator is getting old - when it comes time it will be replaced with a small simple one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Check out this site. They have a lot of information on diagnosing appliance problems & the parts to repair them.

Appliance Repair Help, Troubleshooting, and Appliance Parts
From the link you gave I was able to figure out my problem. I have a bad run capacitor at the compressor. Part is not too expensive but I have called in the local repair man because as usual, it's an emergency repair on a freezer unit & the wife is going nuts over it because she has a birthday party scheduled tomorrow for our daughter. But at least I know what the problem is. Now I will see if I have an honest repairman!! Thanks.
 

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I have a bad run capacitor at the compressor.
I had that happen on the AC unit last summer in the middle of a heat wave on a Sunday. The capacitor was about the size of a soda can and cost only $10. I figure the emergency call from a repairman would have run north of $100. Hardest thing was finding a distributor that would sell to a non-HVAC person. Had to drive about an hour one way to get it, then i ordered one online to have as a spare.

Popped it in and back to making cool air in the 90+ temps....i was a hero for the moment....it didn't last long but i enjoyed it while it did!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok. Thought I would say what my repair was on the Fridge/Freezer. The repair Co. was just in the next town over. The service call was $58, labor was $22. & the capacitor part was $61. Well it did get fixed within five hours of calling the company which has been around 45 years. I could have tried to locate the part & go buy it on my own, but then there could have been additional issues. Also, the wife was sweating it out with a lot of frozen food & whatever else & me with warm beer. So we got the Whirlpool guy over here & we were up & running in about ten minutes. He also said that it could have been the temp control circuit board & that would run at least $200.

The one piece of advice he gave me I want to pass on. He said they see more electrical component part failures in appliances that are built into cabinet surrounds from the lack of air circulation & also from too much coil obstruction from pet hair. He advised that if I could get a little air flow to the back of the Fridge I may avoid future problems. Luckily, in my case I can get additional venting to the back of the appliance with not much of a problem. Thanks for all your help. And my beer is almost cold enough to enjoy with a steak.
 

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The FSIL & I were installing another Navion tankless boiler today. We had another 2 guys helping us. We were discussing the size of the original piping that ran upstairs to the radiators. The one guy thought that the house was originally steam heat. He said no it was just convection back then. Works by the hot water rising up into the house & cool water moving down. Well apparently some of the real old steam systems actually had no moving parts. Without moving parts they have nothing to brake.
Then the talk moved to old refrigerators. They were also built so simple that nothing ever failed in them.
The only real reason either of these were ever replaced was because of the massive energy consumption.
 

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Ok. Thought I would say what my repair was on the Fridge/Freezer. The repair Co. was just in the next town over. The service call was $58, labor was $22. & the capacitor part was $61. Well it did get fixed within five hours of calling the company which has been around 45 years. I could have tried to locate the part & go buy it on my own, but then there could have been additional issues. Also, the wife was sweating it out with a lot of frozen food & whatever else & me with warm beer. So we got the Whirlpool guy over here & we were up & running in about ten minutes. He also said that it could have been the temp control circuit board & that would run at least $200.

The one piece of advice he gave me I want to pass on. He said they see more electrical component part failures in appliances that are built into cabinet surrounds from the lack of air circulation & also from too much coil obstruction from pet hair. He advised that if I could get a little air flow to the back of the Fridge I may avoid future problems. Luckily, in my case I can get additional venting to the back of the appliance with not much of a problem. Thanks for all your help. And my beer is almost cold enough to enjoy with a steak.
that very reason is just another reason i took out the dividing wall, the builder installed. our first fridge that was here, almost caught the linoleum on fire, from pet dander that got up inside. instead we was lucky and the ice cube water line melted off. the wife cleaned out from under it, but we had no idea to take the back cover off, and clean inside their.

so after yrs of argueing about that stupid half wall that was installed i won, the battle:bigthumb: but it still cost me uno:gizmo:bucks. now the new fridge has lots of air movement. yelp-now twice a yr, we roll the fridge out, take that cover off, and run the sweeper over every thing. i still cringe when we seen that burnt linoleum.
 

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Back in 2009, I had a Whirlpool fridge giving problems. I bought a new Whirlpool fridge the next day to replace it. Little did I know, the wife called a repairman to check the broken one. The repairman replaced the defrost switch and got it working again, $85 later. :good2:
I believe it works better than when it was new.
I moved it to my shop kitchen, where it handles duty for my beverages. :bigbeer: It is still going strong.


Thanks Whirlpool; and the repairman. :bigthumb:
 

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i still cringe when we seen that burnt linoleum.[/QUOTE]

I BET!

I mentioned/posted something similar a while back. Heard a annoying ticking noise while I was on the desk phone. Narrowed the noise down to the fridge. After removing the front grille below the doors I found the problem. A plastic plug on the wiring harness had melted. It would pop/tick every time current jumps to the fridge frame. Was kind of working like a spark plug. Found it and just in time.

Actually thought about trying to fix it at first. After about 10 minutes that passed. lol
 

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Back in 2009, I had a Whirlpool fridge giving problems. I bought a new Whirlpool fridge the next day to replace it. Little did I know, the wife called a repairman to check the broken one. The repairman replaced the defrost switch and got it working again, $85 later. :good2:
I believe it works better than when it was new.
I moved it to my shop kitchen, where it handles duty for my beverages. :bigbeer: It is still going strong.


Thanks Whirlpool; and the repairman. :bigthumb:
That's because the Wirlpool repair man is actually in the field doing repairs. (Experience)

Not like that lazy Maytag repair man. He doesn't do anything except sit around complaining. Then having to deal with all his emotional problems. lol

Wonder if he ever found another job? It sure would be healthier for him. lol
 

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That's because the Wirlpool repair man is actually in the field doing repairs. (Experience)

Not like that lazy Maytag repair man. He doesn't do anything except sit around complaining.

 

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Sad situation.
We are looking for all new Kitchen appliances for new build.
We hear the same thing, new stuff will usually last 5-10 years max.
Energy eff. is the cause.
Seems like there should be a study involving the amount of energy making new, replacing and discarding/recycling old vs amount of energy used/yr.
I would hope that has been done.
Our current stuff is a GE ref. thats 25 yrs old, a amana stove 20 yrs old and a maytag dishwasher thats 28 yrs old.
Can see a benefit in energy used when replace our 20 something year old stuff. But if our stuff was only 5 years old then there is little improvement in energy eff. and more energy is used making, replacing, recycling old stuff than is saved buying new and it becomes a waste of energy.
Gotta look at the big picture.
My dad has a '50s ref. in his garage that he keeps drinks in. Still working like a champ.
 

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Sad situation.
We are looking for all new Kitchen appliances for new build.
We hear the same thing, new stuff will usually last 5-10 years max.
Energy eff. is the cause.
Seems like there should be a study involving the amount of energy making new, replacing and discarding/recycling old vs amount of energy used/yr.
I would hope that has been done.
Our current stuff is a GE ref. thats 25 yrs old, a amana stove 20 yrs old and a maytag dishwasher thats 28 yrs old.
Can see a benefit in energy used when replace our 20 something year old stuff. But if our stuff was only 5 years old then there is little improvement in energy eff. and more energy is used making, replacing, recycling old stuff than is saved buying new and it becomes a waste of energy.
Gotta look at the big picture.
My dad has a '50s ref. in his garage that he keeps drinks in. Still working like a champ.
Was at the one scrap yard twice on Wednesday. Had 2 oil burners & an oil tank to to drop off. Each time I seen plenty of peeps dropping off old appliances. Looking around the yard I seen plenty of them already on the pile.

We went to another service call at a large house built in 1993. The original gas furnace was leaking water because of cabinet corrosion so it needs to be replaced. While in the cellar I took notice to his washer and dryer. They were a dark brown color like from the 1970's. The stuff is still kicking after all these years. When we go back to do the furnace I'll ask how old they actually are.

My girlfriend bought one of them Samsung washers that fly apart during the spin cycle. Eventually she got a recall notice about the problem. They sent a new decal to put on the control panel. How that fixes it I don't know. lol
She said that they would let her return the washer for a refund. I asked if she was going to do that? She said hell no! It was too difficult to get the new one in and the old one out of the cellar.

At yesterday's boiler job I was bleeding the kitchen radiator when I noticed the smell of gas. The stove was right next to it so I figured it was leaking from it. I yelled down to the cellar about the problem. Dave said if it's an old stove it probably has pilot lights that went out when the gas was turned off. When he came up to look he said oh my that is an old one. He later told me that it was so old that it didn't even have a pilot light for the oven just the burners You have to stick a match into a hole to light the oven every time you want to bake something. That stove has to be from the 1950's and it's still kicking.
 
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