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So I've spend the last week clearing our lot for a house and have cut down a large amount of white pine logs. Not straight or decent enough for any type of wood. I kept most of them 12 ft or longer and have a large pile, probably 25 or so logs. Now what do i do with them?? Any way to get rid of them other than just dumping them into a pile and leaving them to rot???
 

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So I've spend the last week clearing our lot for a house and have cut down a large amount of white pine logs. Not straight or decent enough for any type of wood. I kept most of them 12 ft or longer and have a large pile, probably 25 or so logs. Now what do i do with them?? Any way to get rid of them other than just dumping them into a pile and leaving them to rot???
Diameter?

Perhaps rough saw and use as accent wood, fence posts, landscaping, etc?

Eric Gildersleeve ~ KD7CAO
Krugerville, TX, USA
John Deere 1025r
 

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Discussion Starter #3
They are all 10 inches or more in diameter. I asked our excavation person and he wants to charge 400.00 per load to remove them
 

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Give away?

I'm not sure of your location but Woodmizer (sawmill company) keeps a register of sawmill owners doing custom work. If there is one in your area, they might either take the logs off your hands or possibly be willing to saw them on shares where you keep some of the wood. Check Woodmizer.com for custom sawyers or you may have to call them.

A lot depends on the quality of the logs. Larger, straight logs have value. Small crooked logs cost to dispose of.

Treefarmer
 

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Small to saw

photo from yard
Most of those are fairly small to saw for lumber. I only count 4, maybe 5 logs that I would put on the mill. Even those are not really going to produce much in the way of lumber unless I'm really missing the scale.

You can try giving them to a custom sawyer. It's a long shot but costs nothing. Carvers, particularly chainsaw carvers might be interested as well.

Treefarmer
 

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I would just burn them in a fire pit. (Cut Up) or if you have room and it's not a hazard just burn them all in a pile on wet day.
 

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Rapid-Oxidation in the Recycling Pit.
 

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Don't know what part of the country you're in, but on a wood burning forum I visit people will jump at free firewood posted on Craigslist so you could try that. Yes its pine, and doesn't have as many BTUs as hardwood, but if its seasoned it will burn just the same.
 

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Donate them to someone or an organization that helps people needing firewood for heating this winter. Then take a tax deduction.
 

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Seeing as you're from the "third rock", make a fire pit. Cut up the logs and you and your family (if you have one) can enjoy the fire at nights or even in the day when it's cold out. If you give it away or sell it make sure you tell them it's pine as it will still have sap in it this time of year cutting. Not good for a chimney using it for the house.
 

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Seeing as you're from the "third rock", make a fire pit. Cut up the logs and you and your family (if you have one) can enjoy the fire at nights or even in the day when it's cold out. If you give it away or sell it make sure you tell them it's pine as it will still have sap in it this time of year cutting. Not good for a chimney using it for the house.
That's what I always do. I always have a nice fresh pile of seasoned firewood ready to go when the local Scouts need it too.
 
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