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Looking for a good quality 6x12 enclosed trailer that is well built. Currently looking at Car Mate but not sure what else is in the same class. I have looked at Haulmark Passport and Transport and there is not really much difference between the two in quality and construction. American Hauler looks a little better but the fit and finish just isnt there compared to the Car Mate. Are there any others to be looking at? The 6x12 Sportster is $3500 and the Custom Cargo is $3750 which has torsion axles. The trailer will be used for moving around the country. It is hard to beat the one piece aluminum roof and lifetime warranty on floor and roof.
 

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Charmac is a very well made trailer
 
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depending where you are located in NY kristi is in central ny, I have seen many around and people like them

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If you are going to be hauling long distances, this is where I bought mine, all aluminium and lighter than other trailer, excellent quality, all kinds of add on's but I don't think they make a 6' wide trailer

PROLine Products LLC Aluminum Trailers ­ Made in New Hampshire
 

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All aluminum is the way to go. I previously had a SnoPro all aluminum snowmobile trailer and it was very well made. They're manufactured in Maine.

Welcome to SnoPro Trailers Used it for about 10 years. Sold it for what I had in it and purchased a Featherlite in 2009. Car Trailers - Race Car Trailers | Featherlite Trailers

The Featherlite is also a very well made trailer as well. Invest in a Featherlite and it will last a lifetime. Here's mine which is 8' w x 16' l x 6'6" h.

2010-09-11 18.48.24.jpg 2015-09-14 17.24.52.jpg
 
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I have a Forest River Lightning all aluminum enclosed 6 X 12 that I use for hauling my dirt bikes. Torsion axle equipped. Bought it in 2010...ordered it thru a local dealer who I used to work p/t for and drove to Indiana to pick it up. It's been a quality unit for me.
 

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Looking for a good quality 6x12 enclosed trailer that is well built. Currently looking at Car Mate but not sure what else is in the same class. I have looked at Haulmark Passport and Transport and there is not really much difference between the two in quality and construction. American Hauler looks a little better but the fit and finish just isnt there compared to the Car Mate. Are there any others to be looking at? The 6x12 Sportster is $3500 and the Custom Cargo is $3750 which has torsion axles. The trailer will be used for moving around the country. It is hard to beat the one piece aluminum roof and lifetime warranty on floor and roof.

Wells Cargo makes them and actually the plant is close to me. Never asked about prices though.
 

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Haulmark and Pace were well made when I was shopping for ones a few years ago.

Some manufactures offer a wide range of inexpensive to pricey trailers. Most dealers, however, generally stock the cheapest models so you're forced to special order a higher grade models and cross your fingers.

I'd also recommend Featherlight aluminum trailers....expensive but you get what you pay for. You'll have to decide if your needs warrant that kind of investment.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the replies, i finally put eyes on a Car Mate yesterday. It was a decent trailer but there is no way it is worth the extra $1200 over a Haulmark Passport. The wiring was no better than the wiring on my utility trailer, they did have LED lights and they were mounted with so much sealant that it was running down inside of the trailer. I do like the fact of the one piece roof and the lifetime leak warranty along with the lifetime floor warranty. I dont want to sit hear and nit pick their brand as people have different things they look for in a trailer. Going to look around and see what other trailers are in the area and take a look at them as well.
 

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All aluminum is the way to go. I previously had a SnoPro all aluminum snowmobile trailer and it was very well made. They're manufactured in Maine.

Welcome to SnoPro Trailers Used it for about 10 years. Sold it for what I had in it and purchased a Featherlite in 2009. Car Trailers - Race Car Trailers | Featherlite Trailers

The Featherlite is also a very well made trailer as well. Invest in a Featherlite and it will last a lifetime. Here's mine which is 8' w x 16' l x 6'6" h.

View attachment 161738 View attachment 161746
Actually, I would recommend AGAINST aluminum if it will be dragged in the winter months, specifically because the salt eats at the aluminum badly. And, as far as SnoPro goes, I can't say enough bad things about them and their product. I had more quirky little issues with their clamshell top on a snowmobile trailer than I would care to even remember.

When looking at trailers, be sure to get a sense for overall integrity of the structure - especially the floor. 16" center for support beams and heavier plywood on the floor will give you years more use than 24" centers and thinner plywood (just one example). The torsion axle trailers will generally pull more smoothly with lighter loads. Once loaded up, they will be comparable with leaf spring axles.
 

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Actually, I would recommend AGAINST aluminum if it will be dragged in the winter months, specifically because the salt eats at the aluminum badly. And, as far as SnoPro goes, I can't say enough bad things about them and their product. I had more quirky little issues with their clamshell top on a snowmobile trailer than I would care to even remember.

When looking at trailers, be sure to get a sense for overall integrity of the structure - especially the floor. 16" center for support beams and heavier plywood on the floor will give you years more use than 24" centers and thinner plywood (just one example). The torsion axle trailers will generally pull more smoothly with lighter loads. Once loaded up, they will be comparable with leaf spring axles.
My aluminum snowmobile trailer seems to be holding up just fine. It's just a basic 8 x 10 tilt triton. Bought it new in the early 90's. It's seen plenty of road salt over the years. It's out lasted a couple of pickups.
 

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My aluminum snowmobile trailer seems to be holding up just fine. It's just a basic 8 x 10 tilt triton. Bought it new in the early 90's. It's seen plenty of road salt over the years. It's out lasted a couple of pickups.
You're fortunate. Triton had a lot of trouble with a bunch of their aluminum trailers rotting out underneath. You might actually want to take a really close look at where the axle housing mounts to the frame of the trailer. The LoadRite that I had suffered a similar issue because the axle housing material was galvanized steel while the frame supports were aluminum. They were brought into contact with each other, and the road salt significantly sped up the deterioration of the aluminum.

Best thing I could suggest for an aluminum trailer that would dragged in the winter would be to take it to a Line-X or Rhino shop and have the entire underneath sprayed right from the start. Lots of guys reported their axles holding up for YEARS beyond the norm because they had them sprayed.
 

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I ordered a 6 x 12 Haulmark Low Hauler R/T with brakes a few years ago and have been real happy with it. You can order it from any dealer and actually pick it up yourself at the factory in Macadoo Pa.
 

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Actually, I would recommend AGAINST aluminum if it will be dragged in the winter months, specifically because the salt eats at the aluminum badly. And, as far as SnoPro goes, I can't say enough bad things about them and their product. I had more quirky little issues with their clamshell top on a snowmobile trailer than I would care to even remember.

When looking at trailers, be sure to get a sense for overall integrity of the structure - especially the floor. 16" center for support beams and heavier plywood on the floor will give you years more use than 24" centers and thinner plywood (just one example). The torsion axle trailers will generally pull more smoothly with lighter loads. Once loaded up, they will be comparable with leaf spring axles.
After pulling my SnoPro aluminum trailer for 10 years and no signs of leaks, corrosion or any issues with materials & workmanship I decided to move into a larger trailer. Absolutely no problems with the Featherlite aluminum trailer either. My snowmobile buddy is still pulling the old, now 17 year old SnoPro and all he's done is some routine brake maintenance and tire replacement. We've had nothing but good luck. :good2:

YMMV............
 

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I have a single-axle Haulmark 6x10 (don't remember the model, believe I paid ~$3,000 - I would have bought the 6x12 but only had a Jeep Wrangler to tow it at the time) that I bought in 2003 to haul my motorcycles to the track as well as move belongings, christmas trees, you name it. It has been bulletproof. Always sits outside and has very little fading of the top front of the roof (plastic). No leaks at all. I even smacked the top front plastic piece on a parking garage roof while helping a friend move apartments. Put silicone on both sides of the crack and it has held for over 5 years. It just keeps on ticking.
 

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I got my Wells Cargo back in '96. It's been a solid trailer for 20 years now. At the time there were not a lot of trailer stores around like there is now. One manufacture I looked at ran the trailer wiring threw the burred, drilled out hole in the roof rib, no grommet. I walked quickly away from that one. No matter who you chose you really have to go over it and inspect the build quality.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ended up going to look at a Haulmark Passport 6x10 and I was actually pretty impressed with it despite what i have read about the Passport series. Sure the wiring has scotch locks on it but that is the same with even the more expensive trailers I had looked at. The undercoating looked good on the ones i looked at as well. The luan on the walls is a little more thin than i would like but it is going to be used to help with moving so I cant see it being beat up too bad. I ordered it through APC out in arizona and will pick it up in PA at the factory mid June I hope.
 

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Actually, I would recommend AGAINST aluminum if it will be dragged in the winter months, specifically because the salt eats at the aluminum badly. ...<snip>...
Responding even though this is an old thread as it is sure to get found and referenced again. Aluminum holds up just fine as a trailer material when exposed to road salt (or salt water), certainly better than unprotected steel, and better than galvanized in most cases. Many of the cases of corrosion in boat trailers exposed to salt water are actually the steel portions of the frame (bed/bunk), that get worn due to use/stress. Poorly constructed trailers put dissimilar metals (aluminum, iron) together such as where parts bolt together. Those should be electrically separated to stop galvanic action. Aluminum on its own will actually create a barrier to corrosion (that faded look) by forming a hard aluminum oxide film on the surface due to exposure to air (further slowing corrosion). There are hundreds of thousands of aluminum trailers in snow country and used for boat trailers in salt water areas, there are tons of high end aluminum boats designed specifically for salt water. The proper use of sacrificial anodes on those boats stops the galvanic action providing a maintenance free (for the most part) surface.

I would ask the manufacturer what steps that they have taken specifically to stop galvanic corrosion and then look myself at how the trailer is constructed. Every single aluminum trailer manufacturer is aware of galvanic corrosion and has taken specific steps to eliminate it where possible.

Having said all that, aluminum trailers don't weigh that much less than steel ones in most cases so buy the one that will work for you regardless of material. Just focus on construction as meburdick pointed out.
 
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