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Similar situation here, water is hard & on the acidic side, been holding off for no good reason since we moved here 25 years ago. Will be paying attention to the responses! :munch:
 

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We have hard water and are looking to remedy the situation and go to a whole house water filter / conditioner. We are on county water.

Who recommends what?
I use a water softener that was installed by a local dealer that sells them. Been using it now for about 13 years. I had one in the last house I had. One thing I learned about it was to get one that regenerates based on the amount of water you use, NOT time based. Time based wastes water. Time based regens are based on amount of days to regen. It does not matter how much or little water you use. Where the usage based machines will regen after so many gallons used. You will need your water tested to see what type of conditioner you need. They are easy to maintain, fill the brine tank with salt and let it do it's thing. When the brine tank gets low, clean it out and do it over again. Oh one more thing, some states require you to put the flush tube, this is where your filter, when the systems back flushes your filter to clean, will expel your dirty filter water when it regens. They require you to put the tube down your drain someplace to go into your septic tank. My former one dumped it on the ground. Nothing ever grew there for a long ways. Salt just kills it off.
 

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Last few places I've lived I put in both a whole house water filter and a softner. I pickup both up from the HomeDepot, GE brand. I didn't, but getting the water tested is a good idea - you can buy "Send In" kits, or request one from your local government (DEQ). I think most of the new units are "Use based" regen, so they'll only regen if they need to. Anyone with an old time based softner should definitely look into switching to a use based unit to save tons on buying salt.

I've heard you don't want the flush going into septic because the high salt concentration kills the good bacteria.
 

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I have owned Kinetico systems in a couple houses in the past. I wish I had one in my current house. They make an extensive line of water treatment products. Their softeners operate flawlessly with no electricity required and are volume metered.
I consider them a premium brand with a long lifespan, I also work for a company that supplies a variety of machined components to them.
They will cost you a pretty penny.
There corporate headquarters is in Newbury, Ohio. About 15 minutes from my house.
 

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Moved in our house in 1982,,
installed a water softener in 1983.

we have LOTS of limestone under our home,,,

About once a decade, I went to Sears, and picked up a new one.
I never paid over $350,, they have been great.

The softeners are like a cheap push mower,, at ten years, it is cheaper to replace than fix.

We have one faucet outside, plumbed to deliver un-softened water,
that water is used for watering the garden,,, etc.

With limestone hard water, you can not have acid water,,
the limestone would neutralize the acid.

A water softener ONLY corrects the hardness,, nothing else.
If you have sulfur,, or iron,,, etc,,, another unit beyond the softener will be needed.
I have no filter experience,,, never had one,,, :dunno:
 

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It has been a few years since we lived on a well. The water was very good and plenty of it, but very hard. We had the same frustrations that everyone else has with hard water. My wife and I had been talking about a water softener system and had even obtained several quotes. Like everyone, we were concerned about killing the septic system.

One day I was looking through the monthly magazine published by the rural electric association. There was an ad for a magnetic water conditioner. It was basically a large magnet that you strapped around the incoming water pipe. My gut reaction was that this was about the hokiest product I had ever seen. How the heck was this going to get the minerals out of the water?

I called the number in the ad not because I wanted one, but because I wanted to give the guy a hard time for offering something so hokey. As I recall, the pair of magnets cost about $175 (25 years ago). Apparently he was quite prepared for people planning to give him a hard time. He simply said that you had to try it to believe in it. And he offered to send it to me with no money up front to try for 90 days. He didn't want our credit card number. He even paid the shipping, and I think he said he would pay the return shipping as well if we didn't like it. He said we could just send him a check when we were satisfied with how well it worked. Talk about the deal you can't refuse.

It was easy to install. Might have taken all of 5 minutes. My wife and I were both ready to send him the check after using the product for 3 weeks.

We very quickly noticed the clothes were brighter in the wash, there weren't water spots on the dishes, the water felt better and soap worked better in the shower. For a few weeks we had to periodically clean the screens in the faucets. They were clogging up with the minerals this thing was removing from the insides of our pipes. This was the only "maintenance" required for this type of water conditioner, and it was short-lived.

A good friend of mine, one of the finer engineers I ever worked with, also bought one. He also had excellent results. He commented that there are some things that we may never know exactly how they work, but its okay to use them because they do work. After installing this water conditioner, we felt that our hard water issue was completely settled.
 

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I have owned Kinetico systems in a couple houses in the past. I wish I had one in my current house. They make an extensive line of water treatment products. Their softeners operate flawlessly with no electricity required and are volume metered.
I consider them a premium brand with a long lifespan, I also work for a company that supplies a variety of machined components to them.
They will cost you a pretty penny.
There corporate headquarters is in Newbury, Ohio. About 15 minutes from my house.
I put the kinetico system on our well as soon as we moved in two years ago. I don't know how the previous owners lived here for about 9 years without it. The water smelled so bad it was hard to take a shower without getting sickened from it. The system has the brine tank that uses very little salt and also an in line filter that I change twice a month but it runs flawlessly. It cost $4500.00 to put in but it really does a good job cleaning up our water. As stated, it requires no electricity to run and regens only when needed.
 

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getting the water tested is a good idea - you can buy "Send In" kits, or request one from your local government (DEQ).
That's critical. I lived on a well for 30 years and misused and misapplied any and all filters because I never officially tested the water until years later. Then I researched the filter methods and bought a filter system that actually worked for my issues (tannins). The filter itself is simple; tank, Fleck valve and then the proper media depending on your issue. The valve is where the expense is so watch out for stupid expensive systems. They mostly all work the same; back wash through media with a water softener to boot.

We now have rural water (again, first time not having well water in 30 years) but we still use a filter; media is carbon to get rid of some of the occasional smell we get from the treatment plant. And it doesn't hurt our septic. Our system came from Pelican. I liked their explanation of what media treated what.

But, first get your water tested. It's easy and cheap and will save you a lot of trial and error.
 

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When we built or house almost two years ago we had he well water tested and it was a little hard and had some iron in it.

Our plumber suggested an Eductor which introduced oxygen to remove the iron and then a softener. The softener would have taken care of both but it would have to regenerate a lot more. I think I go through a bag of salt every month and a half the way it is now.

The system came from these people.

http://www.aquat.com/

I must say it works extremely well. No stains on the tub or toilets. And just keep the salt tank full.



Softener is on the left then the eductor.

Our old neighbor had a kenitico system that worked well and he liked. They are pretty expensive though.

As others have stated. Get a water test first. Then you know what you’re dealing with.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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When we built or house almost two years ago we had he well water tested and it was a little hard and had some iron in it.

Our plumber suggested an Eductor which introduced oxygen to remove the iron and then a softener. The softener would have taken care of both but it would have to regenerate a lot more. I think I go through a bag of salt every month and a half the way it is now.

The system came from these people.

http://www.aquat.com/

I must say it works extremely well. No stains on the tub or toilets. And just keep the salt tank full.



Softener is on the left then the eductor.

Our old neighbor had a kenitico system that worked well and he liked. They are pretty expensive though.

As others have stated. Get a water test first. Then you know what you’re dealing with.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Love your plumbing setup. So organized and tidy


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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We have hard water and are looking to remedy the situation and go to a whole house water filter / conditioner. We are on county water.

Who recommends what?
I must say I find this a surprise that your on county water yet it is being delivered hard. If you have not done this, you first should have it tested for the amount of hardness you have. Harness varies at times from a high to low range. Its affected by rainfall & other events. Any local lab can do the test for hardness & other mineral content. If you have a local lab that does testing for local dairy farmers on their milk quality, or other general lab work you can get it done. Also your own county should be able to test it for you at very little or no charge. Testing is cheap compared to getting involved with way more equipment than you might need.

And YES to whoever said buy equipment that re-generates on actual use & not on a time system. You will save a lot of salt, money & mechanical issues with softeners. My first system was a timer system. When it needed replacement I put in a Regen system. Big improvement. If your handy with plumbing you could put it in yourself in about four hours if you have clear access to the space & pipes. Good Luck.
 

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Love your plumbing setup. So organized and tidy


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Yes our plumbers did a wonderful job.

I’m getting ready to make a canning kitchen for the Mrs Downstairs. With the pen manifold it will be easy to add in.

:)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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I was told by a friend that did septic work, that he loved the salt systems, if you have a cement tank, the salt will eat it up, and he would get to replace them.
The problem is that some states require that you put the run off tube in the tank. You do not have a choice and unless you do it yourself the plumper will do what state requirements say.
 

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I can understand needing a treatment system for well water. My area is plagied with percipitating iron - the only way to get rid of it is with a water treatment system. Thankfully I have spring water and no issues.

But if you pay for city water, shouldn't it be treated before you get it? I couldn't imagine have to pay for water PLUS having to treat it at my expense.
 

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But if you pay for city water, shouldn't it be treated before you get it? I couldn't imagine have to pay for water PLUS having to treat it at my expense.
Here here! I agree. I'm about 4 miles outside of town and we have city water which doesn't require any treatment.

That would be like buying spoiled milk and having to filter out the lumps. :)
 

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Here here! I agree. I'm about 4 miles outside of town and we have city water which doesn't require any treatment.

That would be like buying spoiled milk and having to filter out the lumps. :)
Around me,, many people switched from town water to private wells,,,
because the town water was so hard, it could not be softened.

That town just switched to a new water source about ~2 years ago.
The water is much better now,,,

I have seldom stayed at a hotel that had soft water,, and most hotels are on "town water",,
That is a pretty large sample,, after traveling almost every weekend for 4 years with our child's sports,,
It was always a pleasure to get home to our softened water!! :good2:

I guess Flint MI is an example of "town water",,, :dunno:
 

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When we built or house almost two years ago we had he well water tested and it was a little hard and had some iron in it.

Our plumber suggested an Eductor which introduced oxygen to remove the iron and then a softener. The softener would have taken care of both but it would have to regenerate a lot more. I think I go through a bag of salt every month and a half the way it is now.

The system came from these people.

http://www.aquat.com/

I must say it works extremely well. No stains on the tub or toilets. And just keep the salt tank full.



Softener is on the left then the eductor.

Our old neighbor had a kenitico system that worked well and he liked. They are pretty expensive though.

As others have stated. Get a water test first. Then you know what you’re dealing with.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro


I have the same type set up. They are Addies from Janesville wis. The iron filter is called an iron genie, it regenerates with water and air. Removes the iron and sulfur smells. Then it goes to the softener. Makes an unbelievable difference.
 

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I can understand needing a treatment system for well water. My area is plagied with percipitating iron - the only way to get rid of it is with a water treatment system. Thankfully I have spring water and no issues.

But if you pay for city water, shouldn't it be treated before you get it? I couldn't imagine have to pay for water PLUS having to treat it at my expense.
That really depends on your "city" water. We're on rural water and the 800 acre lake that we draw from occasionally has major algae blooms. The water is then putrid. Also, some water is over chlorinated and people filter some if it out. Then there's the city water we have at our other property; the water was eating the copper pipes and creating pin hole leaks in the pipes. They never could,figure out the issue. Then there's Flint.

So, just because it's city water doesn't mean it's good water. I test our rural water just like I tested our old well water.
 
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